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April 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
In the first six weeks of a special U.S. redress program, about 500 callers have contacted the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo about payments authorized for Japanese-Americans interned in the United States during World War II, a Justice Department official said Friday. Between 3,000 and 5,000 internees returned to Japan after the war, Robert K. Bratt, who heads the redress administration office, estimated. He said there are 1,500 to 2,500 potential recipients living there.
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NEWS
April 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
In the first six weeks of a special U.S. redress program, about 500 callers have contacted the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo about payments authorized for Japanese-Americans interned in the United States during World War II, a Justice Department official said Friday. Between 3,000 and 5,000 internees returned to Japan after the war, Robert K. Bratt, who heads the redress administration office, estimated. He said there are 1,500 to 2,500 potential recipients living there.
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NEWS
November 15, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Slightly thinner and with a little less hair than he had 11 1/2 years ago when he became U.S. ambassador to Japan, Mike Mansfield on Monday pronounced U.S.-Japanese relations "in excellent shape" as he prepared to begin his second retirement. The 85-year-old envoy, who became both a legend and an institution in Washington-Tokyo affairs, said that he and his wife, Maureen, will "leave with our heads high and our arms swinging" before the end of the year.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Slightly thinner and with a little less hair than he had 11 1/2 years ago when he became U.S. ambassador to Japan, Mike Mansfield on Monday pronounced U.S.-Japanese relations "in excellent shape" as he prepared to begin his second retirement. The 85-year-old envoy, who became both a legend and an institution in Washington-Tokyo affairs, said that he and his wife, Maureen, will "leave with our heads high and our arms swinging" before the end of the year.
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