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United States Embassies Kenya

NEWS
May 3, 2000 | Reuters
A British court on Tuesday ordered the extradition of two Egyptians to the United States in connection with the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. The United States wants Ibrahim Hussein Abdel Hadi Eidarous and Adel Mohammed Abdul Almagid Bary to face murder conspiracy charges in connection with the August 1998 attacks that killed 213 people in Nairobi and 11 in Dar es Salaam.
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NEWS
August 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Two more deaths were reported in Tanzania in the twin bombings of U.S. embassies here and in Kenya. The nearly simultaneous bombings Aug. 7 killed more than 250 people in Nairobi, the Kenyan capital, and 12 people in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania's capital. More than 5,000 people were injured. Hospital officials and relatives in Dar es Salaam said the latest victims died of blast injuries.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
NEWS
July 9, 1990
In reply to your June 23 article: "Moratorium Imposed on DWP Tours": I commend Bradley in his attempt to make DWP an honest and responsible agency. However, I must warn the mayor to keep a close eye on DWP officials, as they are very adept at skirting agreements, moratoriums, laws, etc., After all, they've had nearly 100 years of practice here in the Owens Valley. Also, Mayor Bradley, if you think about it, its initials give us clues to its true character.
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Police here rounded up a dozen suspects Monday for questioning as a witness in Kenya said bombers there masqueraded as U.S. Embassy guards in what may be important breaks in the investigation into terrorist attacks at the American missions last week. Tanzanian authorities refused to reveal details about the detained men. But U.S. officials in Washington said "three groups of suspects"--all believed to be foreigners--are being detained for questioning about the blast that killed 10 people here.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The twin bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa that killed 224 people were part of a plot by Islamic extremist Osama bin Laden to murder Americans throughout the world, a prosecutor charged Monday in an opening statement at the trial of four alleged terrorists. The lawyer for one of the defendants confirmed that his client helped grind the powerful explosive used in the attack on the U.S.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The U.S. government offered a $2-million reward for a fugitive charged with killing 12 Americans by helping plan the U.S. Embassy bombing in Kenya. The fugitive, identified as Haroun Fazil, is the third suspect charged publicly in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in the Aug. 7 bombing that killed more than 250 people, including the 12 Americans. U.S. Atty.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | From Newsday
Two men charged with conspiring to bomb two U.S. embassies in Africa in 1998 attacked and critically stabbed a guard in the eye at the Manhattan federal jail Wednesday, federal officials said. The two who are believed to have participated in the attack were identified as Khalfan Khamis Mohamed, 27, a Tanzanian national, and Mamdouh Mahmud Salim, 40, a Sudanese national, said a law enforcement official who spoke on the condition he not be named.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four alleged followers of Islamic extremist Osama bin Laden go on trial today for the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa, amid massive security and restrictions so tight that jury selection will be closed to the public. The attacks in Nairobi, Kenya, and in the Tanzanian capital of Dar es Salaam left 224 people dead, including 12 Americans. More than 4,500 others were injured.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early months of 1996, agents working in the windowless white cubbyholes of the CIA's Counterterrorist Center made a strategic decision. A joint CIA-FBI investigation into the misdeeds of World Trade Center bomber Ramzi Ahmed Yousef had uncovered a treasure of unexpected data about someone the agents concluded was even more dangerous. His name was Osama bin Laden.
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