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United States Embassies Kenya

NEWS
November 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
A composite sketch of one of two suspected suicide bombers appears to match that of a man wanted for questioning in connection with the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, a Yemeni source close to the U.S. warship Cole investigation said Thursday. The suspect's name was not given. A senior U.S. law enforcement official in the United States declined to comment on the reported resemblance.
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NEWS
November 2, 2000 | From Newsday
Two men charged with conspiring to bomb two U.S. embassies in Africa in 1998 attacked and critically stabbed a guard in the eye at the Manhattan federal jail Wednesday, federal officials said. The two who are believed to have participated in the attack were identified as Khalfan Khamis Mohamed, 27, a Tanzanian national, and Mamdouh Mahmud Salim, 40, a Sudanese national, said a law enforcement official who spoke on the condition he not be named.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former U.S. Army sergeant charged in the 1998 bombings of two American embassies in Africa pleaded guilty Friday and said Saudi militant Osama bin Laden examined a photograph of the embassy in Kenya and pointed to the spot where a truck bomb could do the most damage. Ali Mohamed, a 48-year-old Egyptian-born U.S. citizen, told the court that in late 1993, four years after leaving the military, he was asked by Bin Laden to conduct surveillance of U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | Reuters
A British court on Tuesday ordered the extradition of two Egyptians to the United States in connection with the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. The United States wants Ibrahim Hussein Abdel Hadi Eidarous and Adel Mohammed Abdul Almagid Bary to face murder conspiracy charges in connection with the August 1998 attacks that killed 213 people in Nairobi and 11 in Dar es Salaam.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Tanzanian whose house allegedly was used as a bomb factory in last year's deadly attacks on two U.S. embassies in East Africa pleaded innocent to conspiracy charges. The suspect, Khalfan Khamis Mohammed, 26, could face the death penalty if convicted. He was arrested Thursday in Cape Town, South Africa, and flown to the U.S. for trial. Mohammed was named in an indictment stemming from the Aug. 7 bombings in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a miracle that Lucky Wavai was ever born. His mother, seven months pregnant, was seriously injured in last year's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here when chunks of glass were blasted into her stomach. She wanted to terminate the pregnancy because she feared that her baby was already dead. Today, Lucky's right limbs remain slightly paralyzed. Doctors fear possible brain damage. And loud noises terrify him.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Two Egyptian men suspected of conspiring with Osama bin Laden in the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were given away by their fingerprints, a prosecutor said as the two made their first appearance in a London court. The fingerprints of Ibrahim Hussein Abdel Hadi Eidarous, 42, and Adel Mohammed Abdul Almagid Bary, 39, were found on originals of faxes that claimed responsibility for the bombings, the prosecution said.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
A former Army sergeant accused of conspiring with terrorists to murder Americans helped move Osama bin Laden from Pakistan to Sudan and trained members of his terrorist organization, according to newly unsealed court documents. The FBI complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Manhattan suggested there was a close relationship between Ali Mohamed, 46, a native of Egypt, and Bin Laden, the suspected mastermind of the Aug. 7 bombings of U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Engineers on Monday began a 90-day project to demolish the bomb-damaged former U.S. Embassy building in the heart of this capital. The five-story building has been ruled structurally unsound, said embassy spokesman Chris Scharf. The adjacent six-story Ufundi Cooperative House collapsed when the bomb exploded between the two buildings. The Aug. 7 bombing killed 213 people, including 12 Americans, and injured more than 5,000. A near-simultaneous bombing of the U.S.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Kenyans seeking compensation from the U.S. government for injuries, death or property damage resulting from last year's bombing of the U.S. Embassy in this capital are turning to teams of U.S. lawyers working with Kenyan counterparts. The Law Society of Kenya, the country's equivalent of a bar association, accused the U.S. lawyers of trying to import the concept of "ambulance chasing" into this East African country. The U.S. attorneys insist that their intentions are noble.
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