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United States Embassies Kuwait

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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday called tens of thousands of military reserve forces to active duty and declared that although the United States is "prepared to talk" to Iraq, U.S. officials will refuse to negotiate under Iraqi "preconditions." "The United States won't be threatened," Bush declared, rejecting Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's demands that American troops be withdrawn from Saudi Arabia before negotiations can begin on the freeing of U.S. hostages held in Iraq and Kuwait.
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NEWS
September 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The U.S. Embassy in Kuwait said Wednesday that an attack was possibly being planned against it, and a note found on a plane warned of a bomb attack on the U.S. mission in the Philippines. In Yemen, a Coca-Cola factory received a warning to shut down before it gets bombed by militants, factory officials said Wednesday. Washington has closed some of its diplomatic missions worldwide and increased security at others since the Aug. 7 bombings of the U.S.
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NEWS
December 1, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise gesture, Iraqi officials Friday delivered a basket of fruit, vegetables and cigarettes to the besieged U.S. Embassy in Kuwait city, three months after Iraqi forces cut off water and electricity and ringed the outpost with troops. The unexpected move--which followed strong American protests against the Iraqi treatment of diplomats and hints of a U.S. armed resupply convoy--intrigued President Bush, although he acknowledged that he does not know what it means.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
American businesses in the emirate increased security precautions after an anonymous phone call to the U.S. Embassy warned of a possible attack on an "American location." The U.S. Embassy issued a memorandum advising Americans in the Persian Gulf state to be cautious. Kuwait hosts about 8,000 Americans, including several hundred U.S. military personnel. The embassy memorandum came only days after a similar warning in Saudi Arabia. The U.S.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confusion reigned Sunday over the exodus of hostage women and children from Iraq, while the distressing task remained of accounting for just who would be left behind and what jeopardy they are in. A flight of hostages scheduled to leave on a jetliner from France was canceled without explanation Sunday night, although the plane was rescheduled to arrive here today. In all, about 700 Western and Japanese hostages have fled by air in the past two days, many of them Americans.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Iraq permitted a convoy of 52 women and children from the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait to flee Baghdad for freedom Sunday, but three young males in the group were turned back at the Turkish border, and President Saddam Hussein ordered the roundup of more Westerners in Kuwait. The American youths denied exit by Iraqi soldiers at the frontier were expected to return to Baghdad to join male diplomats still being held hostage there.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar met Friday with a high official of the International Committee of the Red Cross as part of a quiet U.N. diplomatic effort to seek a compromise solution to resupplying the besieged U.S. and British embassies in Kuwait. Red Cross officials said the plight of the remaining handful of diplomats, as well as citizens of other countries, still in Kuwait was discussed.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq's military authorities ordered all Americans and Britons in occupied Kuwait to report to two luxury hotels Thursday, possibly setting the stage for a hostage crisis of unprecedented dimensions. The Iraqi general who issued the order said it was intended to assure the safety of the Americans and Britons--an estimated 6,500 people--but he indicated that those who do not comply will be rounded up, a senior State Department official said.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi forces cut off power and water to the besieged U.S. Embassy in Kuwait Saturday as U.S. and allied navies in the region readied their guns to enforce a new U.N. resolution authorizing the use of force to block all shipping to and from Iraq. U.S. officials said the embassy's electricity was severed about 1:15 a.m. PDT and water was shut off sometime later.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | Associated Press
A leaking gas cylinder exploded in the U.S. Embassy compound here Tuesday and started a small fire, an embassy officer said, adding that the incident was not linked to sabotage or terrorism. The officer said there was no damage to the building or casualties. He said the cylinder blew up when construction workers were loading acetylene onto a truck, setting two other cylinders ablaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1991 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an occupation army, the Iraqis showed military strength and "naked brutality"--but not much smarts, former U.S. ambassador to Kuwait W. Nathaniel Howell said Thursday, "They weren't very sophisticated," said Howell, who got an up-close look at the enemy while under siege for 110 days in the American Embassy in Kuwait. "They weren't very efficient."
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allied troops buried Iraq's dead in mass graves Friday, while the remnants of President Saddam Hussein's army roamed or hid in the battle-torn desert--some apparently unaware that the Gulf War had been called off. An American doctor and a medical specialist were killed by land mines, and U.S. infantrymen exchanged gunfire with Iraqi soldiers shooting from a bus stopped at a checkpoint. Six Iraqis were killed and six wounded, Saudi sources said.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
The U.S. EMBASSY IN KUWAIT CITY should be back in business within the next few days, the State Department said. Spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said that Ambassador Edward W. Gnehm Jr., at left, will reopen the embassy. It was closed Dec. 13 when the last foreign diplomats left Kuwait, including ex-ambassador W. Nathaniel Howell III. Gnehm was sworn in last month, but worked in Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling them "victorious" and heroic, Secretary of State James A. Baker III welcomed back U.S. diplomats from Kuwait city and the last group of American and Canadian hostages from Kuwait and Iraq on Friday at Andrews Air Force Base. Ambassador W. Nathaniel Howell III, who along with a skeleton staff had withstood threats and deprivation to keep open the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait, declared that "we could do nothing else" but hold firm in the besieged compound until the last Americans were freed.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The hostage saga for Americans in Iraq and Kuwait ended Thursday with the departure of W. Nathaniel Howell III, the U.S. ambassador to Kuwait who held out in his besieged embassy for nearly four months. "The flag flies" there still, Howell said when he arrived in Germany as part of the last planeload of Americans to come out of Iraq.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush suggested strongly Saturday that his decision to close the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait could be a prelude to war rather than a step toward peace, saying, "When you don't have Americans there, and if force is required, that's just one less worry I've got." The departure of the eight American diplomats still at the embassy in Kuwait city, to take place when all other American hostages are out of Kuwait, "facilitates the tough decisions that might lie ahead," Bush said.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From offices in Saudi Arabia, Washington and Pasadena, Parsons Corp. has won engineering contracts worth billions of dollars from governments in the Mideast. Now, as the risk of doing business there has become painfully apparent, the company is engaged in a frustrating bid to monitor the safety of its employees trapped in Iraqi-occupied Kuwait and to gain their release. Parsons, like other U.S. firms with Kuwaiti operations, is finding that it can do little.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is exploring new moves in the Persian Gulf crisis in an effort to break the lengthening stalemate there without incurring the huge casualties of all-out war, officials said Thursday. Already, White House officials are seeking United Nations approval for a resupply column that would attempt to pass through Iraqi military lines and relieve the besieged U.S. Embassy in Kuwait city. Other U.S. officials are considering ways to obtain a new U.N.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Free at last, about 500 foreign hostages, including 22 Americans, began flying home Saturday night, becoming the first to leave here following Saddam Hussein's declaration of general amnesty for all foreigners in Iraq and Kuwait. Another 400 or more Americans are expected to leave today, a senior U.S. Embassy official in Baghdad said Saturday night.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise gesture, Iraqi officials Friday delivered a basket of fruit, vegetables and cigarettes to the besieged U.S. Embassy in Kuwait city, three months after Iraqi forces cut off water and electricity and ringed the outpost with troops. The unexpected move--which followed strong American protests against the Iraqi treatment of diplomats and hints of a U.S. armed resupply convoy--intrigued President Bush, although he acknowledged that he does not know what it means.
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