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NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From United Press International
U.S. Army helicopters evacuated about a dozen of the 37 Americans at the U.S. Embassy in East Beirut on Friday during a lull in three days of heavy fighting for control of the area near the embassy. As the Americans were flown to Cyprus, the Lebanese army and Christian militiamen fought scattered battles, but a fragile cease-fire appeared to hold in most of East Beirut, where the fighting has killed 60 people.
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NEWS
July 22, 1994 | Times Wire Services
A Lebanese Muslim was sentenced to four years of hard labor Thursday for complicity in the 1976 kidnaping and murders of U.S. Ambassador Francis E. Meloy, an embassy counselor and their Lebanese driver. Nameq Ahmed Kamel hid in Meloy's car after guerrillas of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine snatched the victims at a checkpoint in West Beirut during Lebanon's civil war. The bodies of Meloy, economic counselor Robert O.
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NEWS
October 30, 1991 | Associated Press
Arab radicals opposed to the Mideast peace conference fired a rocket at the U.S. Embassy compound in East Beirut on Tuesday. The missile struck a wall but caused no injuries or serious damage to the building in the Christian suburb of Aukur, said Lebanese Defense Minister Michel Murr. An anonymous caller to a Western news agency later claimed responsibility on behalf of the Arab Revolutionary Brigades, a previously unknown group.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A military court ruled that the terrorists who orchestrated the 1983 suicide bombing of the U.S. Embassy committed a political crime and cannot be punished. The blast killed 62 people. Political crimes are covered by a general amnesty declared two years ago. The U.S. Embassy declined to comment on the decision, but it could hurt Lebanon's effort to improve ties and business contacts with the West.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | A glance at Tuesday's developments on the eve of the Middle East talks in Madrid
Superpowers: President Bush and Soviet President Gorbachev, the conference sponsors, met for a pre-conference strategy session at the Soviet Embassy in Madrid and emerged expressing hope for a positive outcome. At a joint news conference, Gorbachev said he and Bush agreed to "use all the remedies that we have at our disposal" to bring peace to the Mideast. Palestinians: A senior Palestinian official said the Palestinians would negotiate on autonomy in Israeli-occupied territory.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.S. Ambassador John McCarthy, pulled from Lebanon 73 days ago under pressure from supporters of Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, returned Saturday and urged the rebellious Aoun to "fall in line behind civilian authority." McCarthy drove to Ehden in Syrian-controlled northern Lebanon to present his credentials to a Foreign Ministry official at the home of President Rene Mouawad.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | Times Wire Services
A Lebanese Muslim was sentenced to four years of hard labor Thursday for complicity in the 1976 kidnaping and murders of U.S. Ambassador Francis E. Meloy, an embassy counselor and their Lebanese driver. Nameq Ahmed Kamel hid in Meloy's car after guerrillas of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine snatched the victims at a checkpoint in West Beirut during Lebanon's civil war. The bodies of Meloy, economic counselor Robert O.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The local staff of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut locked Ambassador John McCarthy in his office for three hours to press for higher salaries, an embassy source disclosed today. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Lebanese staff, including guards armed with rifles, blocked all entrances to the compound Friday afternoon in the suburb of Aukar. They "prevented anyone from entering" the ambassador's office. "The ambassador was there alone all the time," the source said.
NEWS
January 27, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, again condemning the seizure of foreigners as hostages in Beirut, on Monday warned Americans there that "there's a limit to what our government can do" for them and urged them to leave war-torn Lebanon. Speaking on background, one Administration official was even more blunt: "If these damn fools insist on staying there, there should be a limit on what one can be expected to do."
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A military court ruled that the terrorists who orchestrated the 1983 suicide bombing of the U.S. Embassy committed a political crime and cannot be punished. The blast killed 62 people. Political crimes are covered by a general amnesty declared two years ago. The U.S. Embassy declined to comment on the decision, but it could hurt Lebanon's effort to improve ties and business contacts with the West.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | Associated Press
Arab radicals opposed to the Mideast peace conference fired a rocket at the U.S. Embassy compound in East Beirut on Tuesday. The missile struck a wall but caused no injuries or serious damage to the building in the Christian suburb of Aukur, said Lebanese Defense Minister Michel Murr. An anonymous caller to a Western news agency later claimed responsibility on behalf of the Arab Revolutionary Brigades, a previously unknown group.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | A glance at Tuesday's developments on the eve of the Middle East talks in Madrid
Superpowers: President Bush and Soviet President Gorbachev, the conference sponsors, met for a pre-conference strategy session at the Soviet Embassy in Madrid and emerged expressing hope for a positive outcome. At a joint news conference, Gorbachev said he and Bush agreed to "use all the remedies that we have at our disposal" to bring peace to the Mideast. Palestinians: A senior Palestinian official said the Palestinians would negotiate on autonomy in Israeli-occupied territory.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.S. Ambassador John McCarthy, pulled from Lebanon 73 days ago under pressure from supporters of Christian Maj. Gen. Michel Aoun, returned Saturday and urged the rebellious Aoun to "fall in line behind civilian authority." McCarthy drove to Ehden in Syrian-controlled northern Lebanon to present his credentials to a Foreign Ministry official at the home of President Rene Mouawad.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
Threats by right-wing Lebanese Christians to kidnap American hostages and shoot down U.S. helicopters forced the Bush Administration to stage a dramatic dawn withdrawal of Ambassador John McCarthy and 29 American diplomats from Beirut, U.S. officials said Wednesday. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said that Wednesday morning's evacuation, approved personally by President Bush, "doesn't mean we are abandoning Lebanon." Even so, senior U.S.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From United Press International
U.S. Army helicopters evacuated about a dozen of the 37 Americans at the U.S. Embassy in East Beirut on Friday during a lull in three days of heavy fighting for control of the area near the embassy. As the Americans were flown to Cyprus, the Lebanese army and Christian militiamen fought scattered battles, but a fragile cease-fire appeared to hold in most of East Beirut, where the fighting has killed 60 people.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Heavy fighting flared Wednesday in the Christian heartland of East Beirut, apparently the start of a long-expected showdown between the Lebanese army and the Christian militia. Lebanese officials said scores of people were killed in the fighting, which went on through the night. A report from West Beirut quoted a police official as saying that at least 40 people had been killed. An army spokesman acknowledged that the dead included seven military personnel.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Heavy fighting flared Wednesday in the Christian heartland of East Beirut, apparently the start of a long-expected showdown between the Lebanese army and the Christian militia. Lebanese officials said scores of people were killed in the fighting, which went on through the night. A report from West Beirut quoted a police official as saying that at least 40 people had been killed. An army spokesman acknowledged that the dead included seven military personnel.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
Threats by right-wing Lebanese Christians to kidnap American hostages and shoot down U.S. helicopters forced the Bush Administration to stage a dramatic dawn withdrawal of Ambassador John McCarthy and 29 American diplomats from Beirut, U.S. officials said Wednesday. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said that Wednesday morning's evacuation, approved personally by President Bush, "doesn't mean we are abandoning Lebanon." Even so, senior U.S.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The local staff of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut locked Ambassador John McCarthy in his office for three hours to press for higher salaries, an embassy source disclosed today. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Lebanese staff, including guards armed with rifles, blocked all entrances to the compound Friday afternoon in the suburb of Aukar. They "prevented anyone from entering" the ambassador's office. "The ambassador was there alone all the time," the source said.
NEWS
January 27, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, again condemning the seizure of foreigners as hostages in Beirut, on Monday warned Americans there that "there's a limit to what our government can do" for them and urged them to leave war-torn Lebanon. Speaking on background, one Administration official was even more blunt: "If these damn fools insist on staying there, there should be a limit on what one can be expected to do."
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