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NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Reuters
Nineteen of 20 U.S. diplomats ordered expelled from Nicaragua in reprisal for a raid on the Nicaraguan ambassador's residence in Panama City left Managua on Monday for Miami. The group, short one diplomat who was visiting the United States at the time the expulsion was announced, was given 72 hours to get out of Nicaragua by President Daniel Ortega on Saturday in retaliation for the raid Friday night. U.S.
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NEWS
March 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, clearly exasperated by Americans who have protested outside the U.S. Embassy in Managua, lashed out Thursday at American supporters of the Nicaraguan Sandinistas, saying they should accept the results of last month's election if they "want to help the people." In a question and answer session with a newspaper publishers' group at the White House, Bush also praised Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and repeated U.S.
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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | Associated Press
The Sandinista government withheld nearly $20,000 from the U.S. Embassy and its employees when they turned in their money in a currency exchange, an embassy source said Monday. The embassy turned in 208 million old cordobas, worth about $20,800, but the Sandinistas applied an exchange limit of 10 million cordobas per institution. The embassy got $1,000 worth of new cordobas. The remainder was to be frozen in a new cordoba bank account.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Reuters
Nineteen of 20 U.S. diplomats ordered expelled from Nicaragua in reprisal for a raid on the Nicaraguan ambassador's residence in Panama City left Managua on Monday for Miami. The group, short one diplomat who was visiting the United States at the time the expulsion was announced, was given 72 hours to get out of Nicaragua by President Daniel Ortega on Saturday in retaliation for the raid Friday night. U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1987
Nicaraguan police shot and wounded a Nicaraguan man inside the U.S. Embassy compound in Managua after he asked to see an American diplomat and fought with a policeman, embassy spokesmen said. Spokesmen said the man, identified as Roger Kems, 21, was on U.S. Embassy property when a Sandinista officer fired two rounds from a rifle, wounding him in the groin.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
Some 200 protesters, many in wheelchairs, gathered in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday to honor peace activist Brian Willson, who lost his legs when struck by a train while demonstrating against military aid to the contras . The group, mostly Americans, sang protest songs in English and Spanish, prayed, read poetry and listened to a message Willson had recorded from his hospital bed. Willson, who has visited Nicaragua and opposes U.S. aid to the contras, lost his legs Sept.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | Reuters
Protesting U.S. conduct toward its citizens and interests in Panama, Nicaragua has decided to delay delivery of supplies to the U.S. Embassy in Managua, the Foreign Ministry said Wednesday. It said Nicaragua will not allow a U.S. plane that supplies the embassy in Managua every month to land until Jan. 19, delaying its arrival from Jan. 11. 26.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, clearly exasperated by Americans who have protested outside the U.S. Embassy in Managua, lashed out Thursday at American supporters of the Nicaraguan Sandinistas, saying they should accept the results of last month's election if they "want to help the people." In a question and answer session with a newspaper publishers' group at the White House, Bush also praised Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and repeated U.S.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama's Roman Catholic bishops asked the Vatican on Saturday to end its diplomatic sanctuary for former dictator Manuel A. Noriega and hand him over for trial in the United States or Panama for what they call "abominable crimes." In a letter to Pope John Paul II, the 12 bishops said that the possibility of a negotiated exile for Noriega, who has been holed up in the Vatican embassy here since Christmas Eve, has "morally impeded" a peaceful and orderly return to democracy in Panama.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush admitted Saturday that it "was a screw-up" for U.S. troops to search the Nicaraguan ambassador's residence in Panama City, but he unrepentantly added that a weapons cache found inside "makes you wonder exactly what our young men are up against down there." While Bush said that U.S. military officials have apologized to Managua's envoy in Panama City, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega moved Saturday to expel 20 U.S. diplomats from the Nicaraguan capital to protest the U.S.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama's Roman Catholic bishops asked the Vatican on Saturday to end its diplomatic sanctuary for former dictator Manuel A. Noriega and hand him over for trial in the United States or Panama for what they call "abominable crimes." In a letter to Pope John Paul II, the 12 bishops said that the possibility of a negotiated exile for Noriega, who has been holed up in the Vatican embassy here since Christmas Eve, has "morally impeded" a peaceful and orderly return to democracy in Panama.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush admitted Saturday that it "was a screw-up" for U.S. troops to search the Nicaraguan ambassador's residence in Panama City, but he unrepentantly added that a weapons cache found inside "makes you wonder exactly what our young men are up against down there." While Bush said that U.S. military officials have apologized to Managua's envoy in Panama City, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega moved Saturday to expel 20 U.S. diplomats from the Nicaraguan capital to protest the U.S.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | Reuters
Protesting U.S. conduct toward its citizens and interests in Panama, Nicaragua has decided to delay delivery of supplies to the U.S. Embassy in Managua, the Foreign Ministry said Wednesday. It said Nicaragua will not allow a U.S. plane that supplies the embassy in Managua every month to land until Jan. 19, delaying its arrival from Jan. 11. 26.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | Associated Press
The Sandinista government withheld nearly $20,000 from the U.S. Embassy and its employees when they turned in their money in a currency exchange, an embassy source said Monday. The embassy turned in 208 million old cordobas, worth about $20,800, but the Sandinistas applied an exchange limit of 10 million cordobas per institution. The embassy got $1,000 worth of new cordobas. The remainder was to be frozen in a new cordoba bank account.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
Some 200 protesters, many in wheelchairs, gathered in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday to honor peace activist Brian Willson, who lost his legs when struck by a train while demonstrating against military aid to the contras . The group, mostly Americans, sang protest songs in English and Spanish, prayed, read poetry and listened to a message Willson had recorded from his hospital bed. Willson, who has visited Nicaragua and opposes U.S. aid to the contras, lost his legs Sept.
NEWS
August 17, 1987
Two U.S. diplomats incited demonstrations in Managua by opponents of the leftist Nicaraguan government, according to Barricada, a newspaper of the governing Sandinistas. It identified the diplomats as John Moderno, the U.S. charge d'affaires, and Gary Grappon, a vice consul. Police broke up the demonstrations with clubs, electric prods and dogs, and witnesses said 10 demonstrators were arrested.
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