Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Embassies Panama
IN THE NEWS

United States Embassies Panama

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The Panamanian government turned off the electricity at homes of U.S. Embassy employees Sunday, leaving the diplomats in the dark and wondering whether to pay their light bills and break President Reagan's dollar embargo against Panama. The move to cut the lights had been expected, embassy spokesman Terrence Kneebone said, because the United States is about two months behind in paying the electrical bills of its employees to the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond Dragseth, an American college science teacher, was kidnaped and executed by Panamanian army units in the early hours of the U.S. invasion of Panama, according to American officials and family members. The body of the 47-year-old faculty member of Panama Canal College was exhumed Friday from a common grave in a public cemetery. He had been shot in the back of the head.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | United Press International
Panama on Wednesday ordered the expulsions of 48 U.S. government workers in retaliation for U.S. reductions in aid after a rock- and paint-throwing attack on the U.S. Embassy in Panama City, officials said. The order was the strongest anti-U.S. action taken by the Panamanian government since Washington suspended military and economic aid after a mob led by pro-military legislators threw rocks and paint at the embassy and vehicles in June, causing $106,000 in damage.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Panamanian Embassy in Washington, which has been under the control of forces opposed to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, will be closed next week until democracy is restored to Panama, it was announced Tuesday. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, who has used the embassy as an anti-Noriega headquarters for the past 18 months, made the disclosure in an interview on the eve of a meeting of Organization of American States foreign ministers on Panama.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A special envoy of the Panamanian government met Monday with Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams in an effort to calm the furor over a mob attack on the U.S. Embassy in Panama City last week, State Department officials said. Veteran diplomat Aquilino Boyd, a former ambassador to Washington, met for an hour with Abrams. He also plans to see other Administration officials and congressional leaders this week.
NEWS
September 16, 1988
With American diplomats in Panama facing a variety of potential problems in the wake of the Reagan Administration's failed efforts to oust strongman Manuel A. Noriega, the United States will reduce the size of its diplomatic presence there, State Department officials said. The decision was taken at the advice of Ambassador Arthur H. Davis and could result in the closing or the severe reduction of the regional operations of the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Justice Department and the U.S.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | From Reuters
Panamanian government supporters Tuesday attacked U.S. diplomatic buildings in downtown Panama City, hurling rocks and bottles of red paint. Witnesses said about 500 slogan-chanting demonstrators participated in the attack, which occurred after thousands rallied in a show of support for a Legislative Assembly resolution urging that U.S. Ambassador Arthur Davis be expelled.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | From Reuters
U.S. Ambassador Arthur Davis, accused by Panama of meddling in its affairs, has returned to the United States for a vacation and consultations with the State Department, an embassy spokesman said Saturday. Davis has been involved in a dispute between Panama's military-backed government and its vice president, Roderick L. Esquivel, whose staff was fired and his offices closed while he was attending a conference in Nicaragua.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Panamanian Embassy in Washington, which has been under the control of forces opposed to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, will be closed next week until democracy is restored to Panama, it was announced Tuesday. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, who has used the embassy as an anti-Noriega headquarters for the past 18 months, made the disclosure in an interview on the eve of a meeting of Organization of American States foreign ministers on Panama.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The United States, angrily reacting to a violent demonstration by thousands of people at the U.S. Embassy in Panama City a day earlier, Wednesday announced the closing of consular and U.S. Information Agency offices there. "The government of Panama clearly and purposely violated its obligation under international law to protect the U.S. mission and its personnel," State Department spokesman Charles Redman declared.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | From United Press International
The office of the Panamanian Consul to the United States will reopen Monday, despite its sudden closure Friday under a blizzard of visa requests. Rumors flew after Consul General Elizabeth Martinez closed her doors. One security guard said she feared mobs of protesters at the office, which is the only outlet for Panamanian visas in the country. The State Department speculated it was Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's revenge for President Bush's order sending combat troops to Panama.
NEWS
September 16, 1988
With American diplomats in Panama facing a variety of potential problems in the wake of the Reagan Administration's failed efforts to oust strongman Manuel A. Noriega, the United States will reduce the size of its diplomatic presence there, State Department officials said. The decision was taken at the advice of Ambassador Arthur H. Davis and could result in the closing or the severe reduction of the regional operations of the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Justice Department and the U.S.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The Panamanian government turned off the electricity at homes of U.S. Embassy employees Sunday, leaving the diplomats in the dark and wondering whether to pay their light bills and break President Reagan's dollar embargo against Panama. The move to cut the lights had been expected, embassy spokesman Terrence Kneebone said, because the United States is about two months behind in paying the electrical bills of its employees to the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | United Press International
Panama on Wednesday ordered the expulsions of 48 U.S. government workers in retaliation for U.S. reductions in aid after a rock- and paint-throwing attack on the U.S. Embassy in Panama City, officials said. The order was the strongest anti-U.S. action taken by the Panamanian government since Washington suspended military and economic aid after a mob led by pro-military legislators threw rocks and paint at the embassy and vehicles in June, causing $106,000 in damage.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | From Reuters
U.S. Ambassador Arthur Davis, accused by Panama of meddling in its affairs, has returned to the United States for a vacation and consultations with the State Department, an embassy spokesman said Saturday. Davis has been involved in a dispute between Panama's military-backed government and its vice president, Roderick L. Esquivel, whose staff was fired and his offices closed while he was attending a conference in Nicaragua.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A special envoy of the Panamanian government met Monday with Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams in an effort to calm the furor over a mob attack on the U.S. Embassy in Panama City last week, State Department officials said. Veteran diplomat Aquilino Boyd, a former ambassador to Washington, met for an hour with Abrams. He also plans to see other Administration officials and congressional leaders this week.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond Dragseth, an American college science teacher, was kidnaped and executed by Panamanian army units in the early hours of the U.S. invasion of Panama, according to American officials and family members. The body of the 47-year-old faculty member of Panama Canal College was exhumed Friday from a common grave in a public cemetery. He had been shot in the back of the head.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | From United Press International
The office of the Panamanian Consul to the United States will reopen Monday, despite its sudden closure Friday under a blizzard of visa requests. Rumors flew after Consul General Elizabeth Martinez closed her doors. One security guard said she feared mobs of protesters at the office, which is the only outlet for Panamanian visas in the country. The State Department speculated it was Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's revenge for President Bush's order sending combat troops to Panama.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The United States, angrily reacting to a violent demonstration by thousands of people at the U.S. Embassy in Panama City a day earlier, Wednesday announced the closing of consular and U.S. Information Agency offices there. "The government of Panama clearly and purposely violated its obligation under international law to protect the U.S. mission and its personnel," State Department spokesman Charles Redman declared.
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | From Reuters
Panamanian government supporters Tuesday attacked U.S. diplomatic buildings in downtown Panama City, hurling rocks and bottles of red paint. Witnesses said about 500 slogan-chanting demonstrators participated in the attack, which occurred after thousands rallied in a show of support for a Legislative Assembly resolution urging that U.S. Ambassador Arthur Davis be expelled.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|