Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Embassies Russia
IN THE NEWS

United States Embassies Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rocket-propelled grenade fired across the busy Garden Ring Road at rush hour Wednesday blasted into the sixth floor of the U.S. Embassy in an attack by unknown assailants. No one was injured by the grenade that struck the stone exterior of the stately yellow-and-white building at 4:25 p.m., embassy spokeswoman Olivia Hilton said. The blast was absorbed by a large photocopying machine that shielded much of the interior from flying glass and fragments, she said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A spy dispute between Russia and the United States played out Friday, with officials here moving to eject four American diplomats and pledging to oust more later to replicate steps taken this week by Washington. Afterward, U.S. officials said they considered the matter closed, signaling that they did not anticipate a second round of expulsions. And senior officials of both countries said relations on other issues need not suffer. Secretary of State Colin L.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian police on Thursday deemed a grenade attack against the U.S. Embassy an act of terrorism and stepped up security during a diplomatic fence-mending visit by Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott. Kremlin outrage over NATO air strikes against Serb rebels in Bosnia-Herzegovina had put serious strain on U.S.-Russian relations, and the current atmosphere of acrimony has been linked by some politicians and observers to Wednesday's rocket-propelled grenade blast at the embassy.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In retrospect, with a new U.S.-Russian Cold War all but declared, it might just be seen as the first--if unofficial--shot across America's bow. Two years ago, a gunman leaped from a vehicle in front of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and aimed a grenade launcher at the building's mustard-colored walls. When the launcher jammed, he pulled out a second, which also jammed. Then he hoisted a semiautomatic assault rifle and, over the heads of a crowd of protesters, sprayed the facade with bullets.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Come quickly to New York. Our mother is on the verge of dying," read the fax to 59-year-old professor Georgy Grigorenko. "A brain hemorrhage has left her in a coma, and the doctors say she has only a few days left." Fax in hand, Grigorenko, whose late father was one of the most heroic of Soviet dissidents, rushed recently to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow for a visa.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A man identified as a Russian soldier was shot and wounded on the grounds of the U.S. Embassy compound after breaking in and apparently trying to steal a car, officials said. The report conflicted with that given by Russian police, who said two soldiers broke into the embassy and were stopped by a Marine guard, who opened fire, the Interfax news agency reported. One man was wounded and was turned over to Russian authorities. Interfax identified him as Yevgeny Taynakov, 23.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge ruled Monday that "extraordinarily strong" evidence against accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen warrants keeping him behind bars for now, as Russian diplomats demanded information about a secret eavesdropping tunnel that may be linked to the former FBI agent. Russian officials said reports that the United States built the spy tunnel underneath the Soviet Embassy in Washington beginning in the 1970s, if true, reveal "a flagrant violation" of international law.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A spy dispute between Russia and the United States played out Friday, with officials here moving to eject four American diplomats and pledging to oust more later to replicate steps taken this week by Washington. Afterward, U.S. officials said they considered the matter closed, signaling that they did not anticipate a second round of expulsions. And senior officials of both countries said relations on other issues need not suffer. Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | Reuters
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday named the chairman of the Russian Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee as the country's first ambassador to Washington. Addressing a news conference after the Security Council summit, Yeltsin startled reporters by quietly introducing Vladimir Lukin, on hand for the summit, as his U.S. envoy. "For me it is a great honor to be the first ambassador to the U.S.A. from a Russian democratic state," Lukin told reporters.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In retrospect, with a new U.S.-Russian Cold War all but declared, it might just be seen as the first--if unofficial--shot across America's bow. Two years ago, a gunman leaped from a vehicle in front of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and aimed a grenade launcher at the building's mustard-colored walls. When the launcher jammed, he pulled out a second, which also jammed. Then he hoisted a semiautomatic assault rifle and, over the heads of a crowd of protesters, sprayed the facade with bullets.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Perry Hood said he always thought there was something odd about the woman who bought his Vienna, Va., home in December. Ann Manning offered a great price and paid cash. She even ignored an inspection report pointing out loose bathroom tiles and fogged-up windows. Her only condition: Hood and his wife, Laura, had to be out in two weeks flat. Then, after all the rush, Hood heard from his old neighbors on Talisman Drive that no one had bothered to move in. On Feb. 20, things became much clearer.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge ruled Monday that "extraordinarily strong" evidence against accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen warrants keeping him behind bars for now, as Russian diplomats demanded information about a secret eavesdropping tunnel that may be linked to the former FBI agent. Russian officials said reports that the United States built the spy tunnel underneath the Soviet Embassy in Washington beginning in the 1970s, if true, reveal "a flagrant violation" of international law.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A man identified as a Russian soldier was shot and wounded on the grounds of the U.S. Embassy compound after breaking in and apparently trying to steal a car, officials said. The report conflicted with that given by Russian police, who said two soldiers broke into the embassy and were stopped by a Marine guard, who opened fire, the Interfax news agency reported. One man was wounded and was turned over to Russian authorities. Interfax identified him as Yevgeny Taynakov, 23.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian police on Thursday deemed a grenade attack against the U.S. Embassy an act of terrorism and stepped up security during a diplomatic fence-mending visit by Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott. Kremlin outrage over NATO air strikes against Serb rebels in Bosnia-Herzegovina had put serious strain on U.S.-Russian relations, and the current atmosphere of acrimony has been linked by some politicians and observers to Wednesday's rocket-propelled grenade blast at the embassy.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rocket-propelled grenade fired across the busy Garden Ring Road at rush hour Wednesday blasted into the sixth floor of the U.S. Embassy in an attack by unknown assailants. No one was injured by the grenade that struck the stone exterior of the stately yellow-and-white building at 4:25 p.m., embassy spokeswoman Olivia Hilton said. The blast was absorbed by a large photocopying machine that shielded much of the interior from flying glass and fragments, she said.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Come quickly to New York. Our mother is on the verge of dying," read the fax to 59-year-old professor Georgy Grigorenko. "A brain hemorrhage has left her in a coma, and the doctors say she has only a few days left." Fax in hand, Grigorenko, whose late father was one of the most heroic of Soviet dissidents, rushed recently to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow for a visa.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russians reported for their full-time jobs at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow this week for the first time since 1986, and for Andrei Permyakov, the day marked the beginning of his "American dream." Although he graduated from the prestigious Moscow University and has worked as a translator and project manager for private Russian firms, Permyakov is starting out as a driver at the embassy.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Perry Hood said he always thought there was something odd about the woman who bought his Vienna, Va., home in December. Ann Manning offered a great price and paid cash. She even ignored an inspection report pointing out loose bathroom tiles and fogged-up windows. Her only condition: Hood and his wife, Laura, had to be out in two weeks flat. Then, after all the rush, Hood heard from his old neighbors on Talisman Drive that no one had bothered to move in. On Feb. 20, things became much clearer.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert S. Strauss, the wily Potomac powerbroker turned U.S. diplomat, said Monday he will resign as ambassador to Russia by the end of the year but will keep lobbying for the cause of Russian reform in Washington. After meeting with President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday afternoon, Strauss said he reassured the Russian leader that "instead of losing an ambassador, you'll pick one up when I go back to the States."
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Russia's most prominent young entrepreneurs Monday publicly accused an American diplomat of trying to recruit him and two of his colleagues to work for the CIA, but he declared that "not everything here can be bought." Entrepreneur German Sterligov complained in a letter to U.S. Ambassador Robert S. Strauss that two of his employees had been refused visas to visit America and that the Wall Street office of his firm, Alisa, has been harassed by FBI agents. "I know, Mr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|