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NEWS
October 19, 1988
Three anti-apartheid activists who have been encamped in the U.S. Consulate in Johannesburg for more than a month said they will leave the building today to test South Africa's assurances that they will not be restricted or detained. The activists, who fled to the consulate after escaping South African custody Sept. 13, made their announcement in a statement issued by the Congress of South African Trade Unions, the country's largest labor federation.
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NEWS
March 30, 1989
A black detainee on a hunger strike in South Africa escaped in his pajamas from a hospital in Durban and took refuge in the U.S. Consulate in Johannesburg, about 360 miles away. The detainee, Simon Ntombela, 27, a teacher and anti-apartheid organizer, was the eighth detainee to escape from a hospital since September. The South African government announced plans to prevent future breakouts by moving hunger strikers to Bloemfontein, a relatively remote provincial capital.
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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Three of South Africa's most important political detainees escaped Tuesday from a Johannesburg hospital and found refuge a mile away in the U.S. Consulate, setting up one of the stickiest diplomatic dilemmas here for the United States in many months. The State Department said it had been in frequent contact with the men before they were detained without charge more than a year ago and that "we . . . hold them in high regard." No U.S.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Three runaway detainees holed up in the U.S. Consulate here for 37 days walked free Wednesday with fists raised in a salute of anti-apartheid solidarity, testing the government's promise that it would not detain them again or restrict them. "We felt we had made our point and no further purpose would be served by us remaining in the consulate," said Mohammed Valli Moosa, one of the three who escaped from police guards at a hospital Sept.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Three runaway detainees holed up in the U.S. Consulate here for 37 days walked free Wednesday with fists raised in a salute of anti-apartheid solidarity, testing the government's promise that it would not detain them again or restrict them. "We felt we had made our point and no further purpose would be served by us remaining in the consulate," said Mohammed Valli Moosa, one of the three who escaped from police guards at a hospital Sept.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A fourth South African has escaped from detention and was holed up Thursday with three other runaway anti-apartheid activists at the U.S. Consulate, increasing the pressure on both Pretoria and Washington to end a 10-day-old standoff. Clifford Ngcobo, 30, who had been held without charge for six months, slipped away from police guards at a hospital Wednesday and fled to the downtown offices of the consulate, where he joined three other escaped detainees.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A fourth South African has escaped from detention and was holed up Thursday with three other runaway anti-apartheid activists at the U.S. Consulate, increasing the pressure on both Pretoria and Washington to end a 10-day-old standoff. Clifford Ngcobo, 30, who had been held without charge for six months, slipped away from police guards at a hospital Wednesday and fled to the downtown offices of the consulate, where he joined three other escaped detainees.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Three of South Africa's most important political detainees escaped Tuesday from a Johannesburg hospital and found refuge a mile away in the U.S. Consulate, setting up one of the stickiest diplomatic dilemmas here for the United States in many months. The State Department said it had been in frequent contact with the men before they were detained without charge more than a year ago and that "we . . . hold them in high regard." No U.S.
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