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NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It stands in red brick off Tchaikovsky Street, a mute monument to American hubris, Soviet treachery or both. At this juncture in superpower relations, it is a sore point that both countries probably would rather forget. Don't look for the new U.S. Embassy building to be among the highlights of President Bush's Moscow visit--although he ultimately must decide what to do about it, and White House officials say the matter will be raised with the Soviets.
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NEWS
December 14, 1991 | From Times Staff Writer
The KGB, which never previously admitted bugging the vacant new American Embassy in Moscow, last week turned over the plans and microphones used to bug the building from basement to roof. Robert S. Strauss, U.S. ambassador to Moscow, said in Washington on Friday that Vadim V. Bakatin, the new head of the Soviet spy agency, gave him the blueprints and devices in a meeting in his office.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
It was to be a super-sensitive inspection tour of the new U.S. Embassy under construction in Moscow. But how to keep some discussions during the visit hush-hush? Well, there's always Magic Slates. Magic Slates? For 64 years, kids have used these toys to send secret messages back and forth. When mom or dad walks in the room, just lift up the translucent page and the message disappears. So why not use it to thwart the Russians.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | Reuters
Congressional negotiators voted Tuesday to build a new embassy in Moscow to replace an unfinished one riddled with listening devices. The agreement at a House-Senate conference ended a three-year stalemate by providing $100 million for the State Department to begin building a new structure beside the bugged one. No decision was made about about the building that has stood uncompleted since the bugs were discovered in 1985.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
A third Marine embassy guard who was arrested last month for alleged improper associations with Soviet women was released from the brig Tuesday on grounds that there was insufficient reason to keep him behind bars, the Pentagon said. But Staff Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam was ordered to remain on the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., and is still considered a suspect, Pentagon spokesman Robert Sims said, adding that he could face formal charges later.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
A third Marine security guard has been arrested in the expanding investigation of a sex-and-spy scandal at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, the Pentagon said Tuesday. Staff Sgt. Robert Stanley Stufflebeam, who was assistant commander of the detachment of 28 Marine guards until last May, is being held in the brig at Camp Pendleton, Calif., on suspicion of "having associations with Soviet women on several occasions," said Robert Sims, the Pentagon's chief spokesman.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | United Press International
A sworn statement in which Clayton J. Lonetree admitted to giving information to the KGB was presented to the jury Friday at the Marine sergeant's court-martial on espionage charges. David Moyer, a Naval Investigative Service agent, testified that Lonetree voluntarily signed the multipage confession on Dec. 29, 1986, the day he was arrested and more than two weeks after he first approached an intelligence agent in Vienna to tell of his contact with the Soviets.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
It was one of the more dramatic moments in the modern history of electronic counterespionage. U.S. Ambassador to Moscow George F. Kennan sat in the study of his ornate residence in 1952 and read aloud what he hoped the KGB, listening through a device suspected of being hidden somewhere in the room, would believe was an authentic message to Washington. As Kennan read, two technicians scurried about with their detection instruments, homing in on a radio bug like excited hounds on the scent.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | United Press International
U.S. Marine guards in Moscow were told to ignore anyone found after hours at the site of a bug-riddled new embassy building, according to a former head of the guard program, a congressional memo disclosed Tuesday.
NEWS
March 4, 1988
The Soviet Union has resumed bombarding the U.S. Embassy in Moscow with low-intensity beams of microwave radiation, the State Department said. "Microwave signals . . . continue to be detected at the Moscow Embassy chancery," the department's Bureau of Diplomatic Security said in a statement. The statement marked the department's first status report on the still-unexplained radiation problem since Nov. 10, 1983, when then-Ambassador Arthur A.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end, the American who lived in the big yellow house near the Church of the Savior on the Sands could no longer walk the streets of Moscow incognito with his wife, as he loves to do. People, recognizing him, would approach and ask for an autograph or say something like, "Thank you for being here, for all you've done." They might beg a favor, like helping their mother-in-law jump the queue at the emigration line.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, moving an embarrassing 6-year-old diplomatic fiasco a little closer to a conclusion, voted Wednesday to spend $130 million to demolish and begin reconstruction of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow, which is riddled with bugging devices. The money to tear down the building, left unfinished after the Soviet listening devices were discovered, was included in a $22-billion appropriations bill for the departments of State, Justice and Commerce.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It stands in red brick off Tchaikovsky Street, a mute monument to American hubris, Soviet treachery or both. At this juncture in superpower relations, it is a sore point that both countries probably would rather forget. Don't look for the new U.S. Embassy building to be among the highlights of President Bush's Moscow visit--although he ultimately must decide what to do about it, and White House officials say the matter will be raised with the Soviets.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet police have detained a soldier suspected of murdering a butler to the U.S. ambassador in Moscow earlier this month and are hunting for his accomplice, a newspaper reported Friday. The butler, Clemente Pandin, and a Moscow lawyer were killed in the lawyer's downtown Moscow apartment. The Moscow Communist Party newspaper Moskovskaya Pravda said the soldier, a member of a military construction unit, was arrested in the Kaliningrad region bordering the Baltic Sea and confessed to the crime.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet firefighters stole computer disks and other documents, some of them classified, from the blazing U.S. Embassy in Moscow, but no important national security secrets appear to have been compromised, the State Department said Thursday. In its first detailed report on the security impact of the March 28 fire that destroyed the central section of the embassy, the department said there is no evidence that coding or secure communications equipment was stolen or compromised.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As U.S. diplomats and other workers fled a fire burning through the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in late March, Moscow city firefighters rushed in. And, it turns out, so did a number of KGB agents, the Bush Administration charged Tuesday. "The Soviets did have unescorted access to the embassy for an extended period during the fire," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire swept the American Embassy in Moscow on Thursday, destroying the top floors of the building and heavily damaging much of the rest. More than 200 U.S. diplomats and other embassy workers fled the building about 10:15 Thursday morning as the fire, apparently touched off by sparks from a welder's torch, moved quickly up an elevator shaft to the roof of the 10-story building. A U.S.
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