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United States Emigration

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NEWS
October 21, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to ensure that new legal immigrants do not end up on welfare, federal authorities unveiled stringent and unprecedented new guidelines Monday that will make it much more difficult for low-income people to bring in relatives from abroad. The revisions mark a landmark shift in U.S. immigration policy, experts say, chipping away at the current doctrine of family unification.
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NEWS
October 21, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to ensure that new legal immigrants do not end up on welfare, federal authorities unveiled stringent and unprecedented new guidelines Monday that will make it much more difficult for low-income people to bring in relatives from abroad. The revisions mark a landmark shift in U.S. immigration policy, experts say, chipping away at the current doctrine of family unification.
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NEWS
December 12, 1989
The World Future Society's "Top 10 Forecasts" for the coming decade and beyond: 1. Cash will become illegal in the future for all but very small monetary transactions. By 2050, no paper money with a value of more than $10 will remain in circulation. Restrictions on the use of cash, chiefly paper money, would provide one cheap and effective method of crime prevention. 2.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of illegal immigrants with pending green-card applications are grappling with whether to leave the United States by Saturday to keep their applications alive or face new penalties that could effectively bar many of them from ever attaining legal status. A controversial new law--part of a broader national crackdown on illegal immigration--employs a carrot-and-stick approach that is causing widespread unease in immigrant neighborhoods nationwide.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of illegal immigrants with pending green-card applications are grappling with whether to leave the United States by Saturday to keep their applications alive or face new penalties that could effectively bar many of them from ever attaining legal status. A controversial new law--part of a broader national crackdown on illegal immigration--employs a carrot-and-stick approach that is causing widespread unease in immigrant neighborhoods nationwide.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dust rose up against the sunset as a pile driver smashed the flinty limestone into bits and leveled the hill to make way for new houses. An Israeli settlement that not much more than a year ago appeared to be failing was being revived. Dozens of modest homes were under construction, and the settlers, members of the extremist anti-Arab Kach movement, would provide at least some of the tenants.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonard Liu, Ronald Chwang and Andrew Wang are among the engineers from Taiwan who have played a critical role in the Silicon Valley. Combined, they boast 56 years of experience at such high-tech icons as International Business Machines Corp. and Intel Corp. They possess advanced skills in the core technology of the information age, the integrated circuit. And they hold doctorates in engineering or computer science from top U.S. universities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
A 14-member delegation from California, including Irvine Mayor Larry Agran, has been granted permission by the Vietnamese government to travel to Vietnam on behalf of a refugee family reunification project. The trip, scheduled for next Thursday through April 11, is humanitarian and apolitical although delegates intend to discuss with Vietnamese officials and the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Salvadoran national who killed rookie policewoman Tina Kerbrat and then was fatally wounded by her partner was preparing to leave the country this week, and had bought the gun used in the tragic confrontation to take with him to his homeland, relatives and police said Tuesday. Jose Amaya, 32, bought the weapon 20 days earlier from a relative because, in El Salvador, he lives in an isolated, rural area and "everybody over there has guns," said his brother, Miguel Amaya.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nearly 4,000 Jews left the Soviet Union in June, a new rise in emigration that makes the exodus in the first six months of 1989 bigger than that in all of 1988, a resettlement agency said Tuesday. This year, 20,162 Soviet Jews have been allowed to leave the country, the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration said, compared to a 1988 total of 20,082--the highest outflow since 1980. In June, 3,965 emigres arrived in Vienna, the second-highest total this year after April.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dust rose up against the sunset as a pile driver smashed the flinty limestone into bits and leveled the hill to make way for new houses. An Israeli settlement that not much more than a year ago appeared to be failing was being revived. Dozens of modest homes were under construction, and the settlers, members of the extremist anti-Arab Kach movement, would provide at least some of the tenants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Salvadoran national who killed rookie policewoman Tina Kerbrat and then was fatally wounded by her partner was preparing to leave the country this week, and had bought the gun used in the tragic confrontation to take with him to his homeland, relatives and police said Tuesday. Jose Amaya, 32, bought the weapon 20 days earlier from a relative because, in El Salvador, he lives in an isolated, rural area and "everybody over there has guns," said his brother, Miguel Amaya.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonard Liu, Ronald Chwang and Andrew Wang are among the engineers from Taiwan who have played a critical role in the Silicon Valley. Combined, they boast 56 years of experience at such high-tech icons as International Business Machines Corp. and Intel Corp. They possess advanced skills in the core technology of the information age, the integrated circuit. And they hold doctorates in engineering or computer science from top U.S. universities.
NEWS
December 12, 1989
The World Future Society's "Top 10 Forecasts" for the coming decade and beyond: 1. Cash will become illegal in the future for all but very small monetary transactions. By 2050, no paper money with a value of more than $10 will remain in circulation. Restrictions on the use of cash, chiefly paper money, would provide one cheap and effective method of crime prevention. 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
A 14-member delegation from California, including Irvine Mayor Larry Agran, has been granted permission by the Vietnamese government to travel to Vietnam on behalf of a refugee family reunification project. The trip, scheduled for next Thursday through April 11, is humanitarian and apolitical although delegates intend to discuss with Vietnamese officials and the U.S.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Soviet negotiators on Wednesday turned to a matter that has almost been overlooked in the talk about such crucial but remote issues as the phased elimination of nuclear missiles: They discussed the starkly human drama of 13 Americans and 13 Soviet citizens who are prevented by Soviet policy from living with their spouses.
OPINION
September 15, 1991 | MEL LEVINE, Rep. Mel Levine (D-Santa Monica) is a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
There is reason to be optimistic about the prospects for peace in the Middle East. Throughout the last few months, Secretary of State Baker James A. Baker III has traveled thousands of miles in search of a workable formula for peace negotiations. Cashing in on our enhanced credibility from the unique U.S.-Israeli-Arab alliance against Saddam Hussein, Baker received commitments from all of the major parties to attend a regional peace conference next month.
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