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BUSINESS
June 26, 1997 | Patrice Apodaca
A recent national survey found that an improving economy is helping recent college graduates land positions right out of school. That's certainly the case at UC Irvine, where a total of 235 companies recruited on campus this year. That's up from 211 companies that recruited at UCI last year, and 170 in 1992, said Bruce Riesenberg, director of UC Irvine's Career and Life Planning Center.
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NEWS
November 2, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pairing up, they barged into the Santa Ana laundermat and fanned out in opposite directions, swiftly moving in on their targets. "We're with the Marriott," said Teri Michalski, raising her voice above the din of clothes dryers and thrusting a flier at a startled man. "If you or someone you know needs a job, our address is on top."
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BUSINESS
April 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The number of planned job cuts by major U.S. businesses rose in March from a year earlier, climbing to the highest level in more than a year, according to a monthly survey released Tuesday. Planned cuts rose 33.9% last month, to 50,182 from 37,486 during March 1996, said employment firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc. Compared with a month earlier, planned dismissals increased 24% from 40,480 in February. Last month's total was the highest since 97,379 job cuts announced in January 1996.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | STUART SILVERSTEIN
American unions last year enjoyed their first membership increase since 1994, and the vast majority of the gain came in California. So, is the long-suffering U.S. labor movement finally recovering as an organizing force in the workplace, led by the trend-setting Golden State? It doesn't look that way.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A December employment report that was supposed to be released Friday was delayed, marking another critical bit of economic data that investors and Federal Reserve Board policymakers won't see because of the 3-week-old shutdown of federal government agencies. "It's a tough time for policymakers," said Leonard Nakamura, economic advisor to the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. "The longer this goes on, the less likely it is that we can make wise decisions."
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Help-Wanted Advertising Slips: Such advertising in newspapers fell slightly in April from the month before, the Conference Board reported, another indication that job growth has slowed. The business research group's monthly index of help-wanted ad volume declined to 131 from 132 in March and 133 in February, but it remains higher than the 129 level of January and the 123 level of April, 1994.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Barring a recession, most U.S. banks should be able to maintain decent profit margins despite a sharp decline in bond yields, analysts said. Money managers and investors plowed back into bank stocks Friday amid a bond rally sparked by weak May employment data. When bond prices go up, yields fall. The lower yields mean banks earn less on those kinds of investments, but they also give consumers and businesses incentives to borrow. The employment data so emboldened Southwest Bank of St.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Help-Wanted Ad Volume Up: In another sign of strength in the economy, the seasonally adjusted index compiled by the Conference Board rose to 138 in December from 134 a month earlier. It registered 117 a year earlier. "Employers are still busy seeking qualified job applicants," Conference Board economist Kenneth Goldstein said.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprisingly weak report, the U.S. jobless rate bounced up to 5.8% in April from 5.5% a month earlier, and employers' payrolls shrank by 9,000 workers, the federal government said Friday. California's unemployment rate also rose, to 7.9% last month from 7.6% in March, but analysts were encouraged somewhat by a modest job gain estimated at 7,100. Although the national figures were muddled by data-gathering quirks, they raised questions about whether the four-year U.S.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
The pace of new hiring will slacken this summer while remaining generally strong, a survey released today predicts. The survey by Milwaukee-based Manpower Inc. found that 28% of 15,000 companies polled in the quarterly survey said they plan to increase hiring in the July-August period, while 7% said they expect to cut their payrolls. The projected 21% net total planning to increase hiring is down from 22% in the same quarter last year and 23% for the previous three months.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1998 | From Reuters
The U.S. economy was operating at a healthy pace through July, but growth showed signs of slowing as slumping exports to Asia and shortages of employees were felt across the country, the Federal Reserve Bank said Wednesday. "Despite the high level of economic activity in recent weeks, many districts noted that labor shortages, shipping bottlenecks and continued weakness in East Asia were beginning to temper growth in their regions," the Beige Book economic summary said.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN
There doesn't seem to be any end in sight to the booming American job market. Manpower Inc., which publishes a closely watched survey of employers' hiring plans, calls the outlook for the first three months of 1998 the strongest ever for a first quarter in the 21 years the temporary help company has conducted its polls. The report comes as the U.S. unemployment rate, which fell to 4.6% in November, rests at a 24-year low.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
"The unfinished business of America's new prosperity" is to narrow the gap between rich and poor, Labor Secretary Alexis M. Herman said Sunday in a Labor Day message. "These are indeed prosperous times, but still a quiet unease lurks . . . that our nation will declare success before all Americans will have their chance to claim their fair share," she said. Herman said she found during a weeklong nationwide tour that "workers are in better shape than in many, many years."
NEWS
August 21, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Its aim was to end "welfare as we know it" and replace it with a crazy quilt of innovation stretching, state by state, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Federal welfare reform, a year after its enactment on Aug. 22, 1996, has done just that. As states scramble to craft smaller, more selective safety nets for their poor in accordance with the new law, they have set off a nationwide frenzy of invention. The width and breadth of the 50-state effort is indeed striking.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1997 | Patrice Apodaca
A recent national survey found that an improving economy is helping recent college graduates land positions right out of school. That's certainly the case at UC Irvine, where a total of 235 companies recruited on campus this year. That's up from 211 companies that recruited at UCI last year, and 170 in 1992, said Bruce Riesenberg, director of UC Irvine's Career and Life Planning Center.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The number of planned job cuts by major U.S. businesses rose in March from a year earlier, climbing to the highest level in more than a year, according to a monthly survey released Tuesday. Planned cuts rose 33.9% last month, to 50,182 from 37,486 during March 1996, said employment firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc. Compared with a month earlier, planned dismissals increased 24% from 40,480 in February. Last month's total was the highest since 97,379 job cuts announced in January 1996.
NEWS
August 21, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Its aim was to end "welfare as we know it" and replace it with a crazy quilt of innovation stretching, state by state, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Federal welfare reform, a year after its enactment on Aug. 22, 1996, has done just that. As states scramble to craft smaller, more selective safety nets for their poor in accordance with the new law, they have set off a nationwide frenzy of invention. The width and breadth of the 50-state effort is indeed striking.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton told corporate leaders Friday that the country's welfare reform effort will fail unless the private sector creates jobs for former recipients but a leading business advocacy group warned immediately that it cannot fill the bill. "It's a foregone conclusion that the private sector will have a hard time absorbing these people into the work force," said Jeffrey H. Joseph, vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
Haven't heard that giant sucking sound? Maybe that's because there hasn't been one. The North American Free Trade Agreement has not taken a substantial number of jobs from Americans, but neither has it generated the new employment its fans had promised, according to a U.S. government-funded study--the most comprehensive analysis yet of the 1994 accord. NAFTA's impact on U.S. jobs has been near-zero or slightly positive, researchers at UCLA found in a study to be released today.
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