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NEWS
April 2, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a damp, slate-gray day here last winter, the Bush Administration saw just how hard it would be to forge a national energy policy--a process that reaches a milestone today. In a drafty, oversized meeting room deep in the riverfront Cobo Hall, officials from the departments of Energy and Transportation heard a parade of speakers deliver blunt, often diametrically opposing views on how to prepare the country for the coming energy crunch.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 2000 | Indraneel Sur
A group of small Canadian and American energy companies said it expects to collect a substantial amount of natural gas from a site near Bakersfield where it started testing flows at a new well over the weekend. Berkley Petroleum Corp., the 5-year-old Calgary, Canada, firm leading the drilling, said the East Lost Hills, Calif., well could generate as much as 30 million cubic feet of natural gas a day.
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NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The United States must take major steps to cut energy consumption--including more efficient automobiles and home heating systems--if expected global warming problems are to be eased, the Environmental Protection Agency said Friday. In a report to a Senate environmental subcommittee, the EPA outlined actions that are needed by the end of the century if the movement toward a dangerously warmer Earth is to be slowed.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a damp, slate-gray day here last winter, the Bush Administration saw just how hard it would be to forge a national energy policy--a process that reaches a milestone today. In a drafty, oversized meeting room deep in the riverfront Cobo Hall, officials from the departments of Energy and Transportation heard a parade of speakers deliver blunt, often diametrically opposing views on how to prepare the country for the coming energy crunch.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000 | Indraneel Sur
A group of small Canadian and American energy companies said it expects to collect a substantial amount of natural gas from a site near Bakersfield where it started testing flows at a new well over the weekend. Berkley Petroleum Corp., the 5-year-old Calgary, Canada, firm leading the drilling, said the East Lost Hills, Calif., well could generate as much as 30 million cubic feet of natural gas a day.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Four protesters delayed but failed to halt the test of a British nuclear weapon Wednesday by infiltrating the remote Nevada Test Site and making their way to ground zero. The device, with an explosive force about 12 times that of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, was detonated at 11:17 a.m., more than two hours behind schedule after the four were removed by security officers, Department of Energy authorities said.
WORLD
September 14, 2004 | From Reuters
Deadly Hurricane Ivan ripped off roofs, downed trees and power lines and flooded coastal areas Monday as it grazed the western tip of Cuba and headed toward the United States. Energy companies pulled thousands of workers from offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico, home to about a quarter of U.S. output, and world oil prices rose with the reduced production.
OPINION
August 25, 2004
As the price of a barrel of oil flirts with the $50 mark, President Bush and Sen. John Kerry are promising to make the United States energy-independent. If that sounds familiar, it's because we've heard the same thing from presidents and presidential candidates since Richard Nixon in 1973 vowed to accomplish that goal by 1980. Next year marks the 25th anniversary of his Project Independence's failure.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2009 | Marla Dickerson
Academy Award winners Joel and Ethan Coen, known for their grimly comic portrayals of human nature, are poking fun at a new target: the coal industry. The filmmaking brothers have directed a TV spot for an environmental coalition that's trying to demolish the notion that there's anything clean about so-called clean coal.
HEALTH
March 14, 2012 | By John Hoeffel
Newt Gingrich wanted to show up in the Chicago suburbs Wednesday with two new reasons Republicans should make him their presidential nominee: Alabama and Mississippi. Instead, with two more losses and no momentum boost, he stuck to an old standby: He's the smartest guy in the race. Putting himself in the company of Abraham Lincoln and Ronald Reagan, he argued that he is the only candidate running in the GOP contests who gets science and technology and who knows how to employ it to revolutionize the federal government.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The United States must take major steps to cut energy consumption--including more efficient automobiles and home heating systems--if expected global warming problems are to be eased, the Environmental Protection Agency said Friday. In a report to a Senate environmental subcommittee, the EPA outlined actions that are needed by the end of the century if the movement toward a dangerously warmer Earth is to be slowed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2004 | Emily Gurnon and Deborah Schoch, Special to The Times
Independent power producer Calpine Corp. on Wednesday abruptly withdrew plans to build a liquefied natural gas terminal on Humboldt Bay, astonishing and delighting hundreds of residents who had rallied to defeat the project. Calpine's announcement came the afternoon after a raucous meeting at which 900 people packed the auditorium of this small coastal city, the vast majority denouncing the idea of importing the flammable gas through their community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1986
The title of your editorial (March 17), advocating a higher gasoline tax, was "New Oil Jolt," but your position on this issue is quite old and just as ineffective as when you supported it almost six years ago. (June 16, 1980). Back then you questioned whether Congress was serious about moving the United States toward energy independence by refusing to pass a 10-cent-a-gallon gasoline tax over President Carter's objections. The Carter Administration and The Times argued that higher prices, in the form of increased taxes, on domestic gasoline would cut our dependence on imported oil. Congress and the consumer won the argument; the Carter tax proposal was never passed and energy prices stabilized at relatively high levels even without the added tax. Despite the high price levels of gasoline and other fossil fuels, the free market victory on the gasoline tax issue in 1980 developed into a U.S. energy picture that looks brighter than it has in decades.
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