Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Energy Policy
IN THE NEWS

United States Energy Policy

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Bill Clinton is focused like a laser beam on the nation's economy, not its ecology, one thing is clear: It won't be business as usual when it comes to environmental regulations and enforcement, a prospect that has Southern California's industrial leaders and developers a bit unnerved.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 18, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN and TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's energy plan, unveiled Thursday, helped spark a broad rally across the energy sector and among firms that stand to benefit by selling equipment and services to oil and natural gas companies. Yet Wall Street has been taking a cautious stance toward energy shares in recent months, and Thursday's rally doesn't change much, some analysts and money managers say.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress approved far-reaching energy policy reforms Thursday, sending to the President a bill designed to increase the use of nuclear energy and spur the development of alternative and renewable fuels. Two years in the drafting, the massive rewrite of the nation's energy policies cleared the last in a long and daunting series of hurdles when the Senate voted, 84 to 8, to halt a filibuster by senators from Nevada.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration announced Friday that the government will sell 30 million barrels of oil from the nation's Strategic Petroleum Reserve over the next 30 days to help damp down energy prices and assure an ample supply of home heating oil for the coming winter. The announcement came just a day after Vice President Al Gore--reportedly worried that GOP candidate George W. Bush was about to take the initiative on oil policy--called for tapping the reserve.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Rawlings isn't worried about this country's energy use. "This new truck I have here sort of testifies to that," the 33-year-old Santa Monica accountant said the other day as he filled the twin tanks of a new full-size Ford pickup at a Van Nuys Arco station. He concedes that the truck's gas mileage--about 12 to 15 miles per gallon--did not enter his mind when he bought it. "I don't think we have a problem with imported oil," Rawlings said.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His brow furrowed, Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore.) said: "I vote three-quarters yes and one-quarter no." Laughter erupted in the Senate hearing room last week. "I'll count that as a yes vote," Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) replied. Packwood's uncertainty--his attempt to lean in two directions at once during a crucial vote--reflected the ambivalence of many lawmakers as they grapple with the always contentious issue of fuel economy standards for automobiles.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate began debating a major overhaul of the nation's energy strategy Thursday but the long-stalled effort to cut back on foreign oil imports quickly ran into fierce opposition from environmentalists, who threatened a series of filibusters.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. May Be More Vulnerable to Oil Supply Cut: The United States is losing its ability to respond to disruptions in oil imports, making the nation more vulnerable to a cutoff in supply, a government report said. The report by the Office of Technology Assessment, which researches technology issues for Congress, said the country continues to grow more reliant on imported oil as domestic production declines and demand for energy increases.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992
President-elect Bill Clinton has called for a shift from growing U.S. dependence on foreign oil to greater reliance on domestic natural gas, renewable fuels and energy conservation. This adds new opportunities and challenges to companies producing a complex mix of fuels. Natural Gas: Abundant domestic reserves and support from the 1992 energy law, environmentalists and Clinton appointees make natural gas producers optimistic for a change.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton has said he plans to staunch growing foreign oil imports through conservation and by encouraging greater use of domestic natural gas and renewable energies such as solar and wind power. By all accounts, this will be a formidable task. Recent administrations have not made oil-import reductions a priority, in large part to keep energy costs down at a time when U.S. industries were struggling to compete internationally.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992
President-elect Bill Clinton has called for a shift from growing U.S. dependence on foreign oil to greater reliance on domestic natural gas, renewable fuels and energy conservation. This adds new opportunities and challenges to companies producing a complex mix of fuels. Natural Gas: Abundant domestic reserves and support from the 1992 energy law, environmentalists and Clinton appointees make natural gas producers optimistic for a change.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton has said he plans to staunch growing foreign oil imports through conservation and by encouraging greater use of domestic natural gas and renewable energies such as solar and wind power. By all accounts, this will be a formidable task. Recent administrations have not made oil-import reductions a priority, in large part to keep energy costs down at a time when U.S. industries were struggling to compete internationally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Bill Clinton is focused like a laser beam on the nation's economy, not its ecology, one thing is clear: It won't be business as usual when it comes to environmental regulations and enforcement, a prospect that has Southern California's industrial leaders and developers a bit unnerved.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress approved far-reaching energy policy reforms Thursday, sending to the President a bill designed to increase the use of nuclear energy and spur the development of alternative and renewable fuels. Two years in the drafting, the massive rewrite of the nation's energy policies cleared the last in a long and daunting series of hurdles when the Senate voted, 84 to 8, to halt a filibuster by senators from Nevada.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, winding up one of the most complex and bitter legislative debates of this session, passed a far-reaching energy bill Wednesday aimed at reducing reliance on imported oil by encouraging development of renewable fuels, requiring greater energy efficiency and easing federal regulations for new nuclear power plants.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, considering the first congressional attempt in more than a decade to craft a national energy policy, Wednesday adopted a Bush Administration proposal to stimulate the construction of nuclear power plants.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN and TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's energy plan, unveiled Thursday, helped spark a broad rally across the energy sector and among firms that stand to benefit by selling equipment and services to oil and natural gas companies. Yet Wall Street has been taking a cautious stance toward energy shares in recent months, and Thursday's rally doesn't change much, some analysts and money managers say.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year-old plant in the San Joaquin Valley uses one of the world's oldest technologies--burning wood--to generate energy. But that's where any resemblance to the past ends. The so-called biomass plant, operated by Delano Energy Co., takes 700 tons of prunings, fruit pits and waste wood a day from nearby orchards and burns them in a state-of-the-art furnace that emits fewer emissions than an old-fashioned wood-burning stove. The resulting heat is used to make steam that drives turbines.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legislation backed by the Bush Administration as a master plan for America's future energy requirements was effectively killed in the Senate Friday when supporters failed to overcome a filibuster by lawmakers who oppose drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In an outcome that startled even the victors, supporters of the omnibus energy legislation fell 10 votes short of the 60 they needed to shut off the filibuster mounted by a bipartisan coalition of pro-environment senators.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate began debating a major overhaul of the nation's energy strategy Thursday but the long-stalled effort to cut back on foreign oil imports quickly ran into fierce opposition from environmentalists, who threatened a series of filibusters.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|