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June 10, 1990 | SARAH HENRY, Sarah Henry is a staff writer with the Center for Investigative Reporting in San Francisco. Melanie Best provided research assistance.
THE TROUBLE BEGAN in an empty patients' room on the third floor of the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. Aida Dimaranan, an assistant head nurse on the maternity ward, was taking a dinner break. She didn't want to get too far from the busy unit, so she and two other Filipina nurses sat on the beds, sharing a quick meal and swapping stories about their children's latest antics. They spoke quietly in Tagalog, a language of the Philippines.
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MAGAZINE
June 10, 1990 | SARAH HENRY, Sarah Henry is a staff writer with the Center for Investigative Reporting in San Francisco. Melanie Best provided research assistance.
THE TROUBLE BEGAN in an empty patients' room on the third floor of the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. Aida Dimaranan, an assistant head nurse on the maternity ward, was taking a dinner break. She didn't want to get too far from the busy unit, so she and two other Filipina nurses sat on the beds, sharing a quick meal and swapping stories about their children's latest antics. They spoke quietly in Tagalog, a language of the Philippines.
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NEWS
July 28, 1987
Former White House aide Linda Chavez, who lost a Senate race in Maryland last fall, said she is going to work for a leading group in the campaign to make English the official language of the United States. Chavez, a 40-year-old Latino native of Albuquerque, N.M., said she agreed late last week to join the 300,000-member U.S. English group as president, starting in mid-August.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Linda Chavez sighed deeply under the weight of her latest controversy and, perhaps, the greatest irony of her professional career. Here she was, the consummate planner who in an uncharacteristically hasty move had resigned as president of U.S. English, a group Latinos deplore, and the best thing her Latino critics had to say about her was that she may have made the right move for the wrong reasons and that she'd waited too long to make it anyway.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Linda Chavez sighed deeply under the weight of her latest controversy and, perhaps, the greatest irony of her professional career. Here she was, the consummate planner who in an uncharacteristically hasty move had resigned as president of U.S. English, a group Latinos deplore, and the best thing her Latino critics had to say about her was that she may have made the right move for the wrong reasons and that she'd waited too long to make it anyway.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Linda Chavez is cool, very cool, considering the brutal Washington summer and the firestorm that has followed her appointment to head U.S. English, a group that wants to make English the nation's official language. An island of calm amid the din of lunchtime chatter at a downtown restaurant, she speaks with precision, rarely gesturing. Her body does not talk; it is only her well-modulated voice you hear. Yes, she knows that many Latino activists call U.S. English the enemy.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Linda Chavez is cool, very cool, considering the brutal Washington summer and the firestorm that has followed her appointment to head U.S. English, a group that wants to make English the nation's official language. An island of calm amid the din of lunchtime chatter at a downtown restaurant, she speaks with precision, rarely gesturing. Her body does not talk; it is only her well-modulated voice you hear. Yes, she knows that many Latino activists call U.S. English the enemy.
NEWS
July 28, 1987
Former White House aide Linda Chavez, who lost a Senate race in Maryland last fall, said she is going to work for a leading group in the campaign to make English the official language of the United States. Chavez, a 40-year-old Latino native of Albuquerque, N.M., said she agreed late last week to join the 300,000-member U.S. English group as president, starting in mid-August.
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