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United States Espionage

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NEWS
December 21, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Two military officers claimed on state television that they had delivered secrets to the CIA. The confessions of the officers and two taxi drivers who allegedly worked with them were broadcast on the same day that Iraq announced it had cracked a CIA spy ring. Although the CIA refused to comment, the U.S. State Department dismissed the allegations as propaganda. "If anybody believes these reports, they ought to have their heads examined," spokesman Nicholas Burns said in Washington.
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NEWS
December 21, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Two military officers claimed on state television that they had delivered secrets to the CIA. The confessions of the officers and two taxi drivers who allegedly worked with them were broadcast on the same day that Iraq announced it had cracked a CIA spy ring. Although the CIA refused to comment, the U.S. State Department dismissed the allegations as propaganda. "If anybody believes these reports, they ought to have their heads examined," spokesman Nicholas Burns said in Washington.
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NEWS
March 3, 2000 |
A Cuban diplomat who hid out in the Cuban Embassy in Canada after being expelled from the United States over espionage suspicions received a hero's welcome when he returned home Thursday after five days of uncertainty. President Fidel Castro embraced Jose Imperatori as the diplomat stepped onto the tarmac late Thursday afternoon. Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque and Ricardo Alarcon, the National Assembly president, also were in the high-level delegation welcoming him.
NEWS
August 9, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Arthur J. Walker, variously described as a "sap" and someone "who put a knife in the back of the United States," was convicted in 10 minutes today on seven counts of helping his brother pass military secrets to the Soviet Union. U.S. District Judge J. Calvitt Clarke, who heard the case without a jury, handed down his verdict against the retired Navy lieutenant commander minutes after the defense and prosecution finished their closing arguments.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks in Baghdad aimed at breaking the deadlock over U.N. weapons inspections in Iraq began Monday with both sides nailing down long-standing--and mutually incompatible--bargaining positions. Richard Butler, the Australian disarmament expert who heads the U.N. inspection program, rejected an ultimatum issued Saturday by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein demanding a deadline for completion of the inspection process. Meanwhile, a crowd of demonstrators estimated at 1,500 to 5,000 protested outside U.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A former KGB agent held in the United States on espionage charges flew back to a hero's welcome in Moscow on Saturday and said it felt great to be free again. Washington dismissed its case against Vladimir Galkin on Thursday after Moscow threatened retaliatory measures. Russia believes the United States violated an unwritten, gentlemanly code of honor in international espionage allowing former agents to travel freely.
NEWS
August 11, 1985 | United Press International
Arthur Walker, variously described as a "sap" and someone "who put a knife in the back of the United States," was convicted in 15 minutes Friday of helping his brother pass military secrets to the Soviet Union. U.S. District Judge J. Calvitt Clarke swiftly handed down his verdict after the defense and prosecution finished their closing arguments.
NEWS
March 24, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Suggesting that he sympathized with his overwhelmingly antiwar countrymen, King Abdullah II called Sunday for a quick end to the war against Iraq. "We felt pain and distress watching those scenes on TV showing the suffering of the brotherly Iraqi people," said Abdullah, a low-profile friend of the U.S., whose government has been increasingly nervous about the growing popular protests against the war on Jordan's eastern border.
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Edward Snowden's long sojourn at Moscow's international airport may be nearing an end. “Any day now, Snowden may get an official confirmation from the Federal Migration Service" that his application for temporary asylum is being reviewed, his attorney, Anatoly Kucherena, said in an interview Wednesday with The Times. "With this document, he will be able at last to leave the airport and properly and legally enter Russia.” Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked classified information about U.S. Internet spying, is believed to have been biding his time for most of the last month in the transit zone of Sheremetyevo airport -- a notoriously dreary place that most travelers are happy to leave as quickly as possible.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The United States Friday expelled a Soviet diplomat at the United Nations after accusing him of spying but went to extraordinary lengths to minimize the incident in an apparent effort to avoid disturbing the current delicate state of U.S.-Soviet relations. The diplomat, Mikhail Katkov, a second secretary assigned to the Soviet mission at the United Nations, allegedly was caught in New York City Thursday by FBI agents as he was trying to acquire unspecified military technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010
The Oscar race is officially on. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said Monday that it has mailed out nomination ballots to the 5,755 of its members who will be voting for the Academy Awards for 2010. Each year a few hundred movies hope to qualify for Oscars, but only 10 will be nominated for best feature film. Their producers and distributors began jockeying for position as far back as the summer, but only now can votes begin to be cast. Nominations will be unveiled Jan. 25, with the winners to be announced Feb. 27 in ceremonies at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood.
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