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June 24, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is coming under increasing fire for failing to marshal the U.S. intelligence community's vast resources to deal with the Haiti crisis, either as an alternative to military action or to soften the ground before American intervention. Critics ranging from congressional officials to the Administration's own foreign policy specialists are concerned the United States appears to be nearing intervention without first using intelligence mechanisms to undermine Lt. Gen.
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NEWS
October 8, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
During the three years of Haiti's military regime, Emmanuel (Toto) Constant ran one of the country's most feared paramilitary groups, terrorizing opponents of the government and even humiliating the United States by forcing the Harlan County, a cargo ship carrying peacekeeping troops, to turn tail and withdraw. For much of that time, he was also an agent in good standing with the CIA. And today, Constant is once again working for the U.S.
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NEWS
October 8, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
During the three years of Haiti's military regime, Emmanuel (Toto) Constant ran one of the country's most feared paramilitary groups, terrorizing opponents of the government and even humiliating the United States by forcing the Harlan County, a cargo ship carrying peacekeeping troops, to turn tail and withdraw. For much of that time, he was also an agent in good standing with the CIA. And today, Constant is once again working for the U.S.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is coming under increasing fire for failing to marshal the U.S. intelligence community's vast resources to deal with the Haiti crisis, either as an alternative to military action or to soften the ground before American intervention. Critics ranging from congressional officials to the Administration's own foreign policy specialists are concerned the United States appears to be nearing intervention without first using intelligence mechanisms to undermine Lt. Gen.
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