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OPINION
December 14, 2011 | By Bruce Ackerman
Are we witnessing the birth of the United States of Europe? There are uncanny similarities between the current round of wheeling and dealing and the founding of the United States of America. The Philadelphia Convention of 1787 represented America's second try at continental union. In 1781, the 13 states had come together behind a treaty-constitution that broadly resembles present European arrangements. America's first effort was the Articles of Confederation. Like the European Union treaties, it guaranteed each citizen's right to move throughout the confederation and exercise all the economic privileges of home-staters.
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OPINION
March 18, 2012 | By Stephen Schlesinger
With the possibility of a confrontation looming with Iran, one historical example that should command American attention in its hour of decision - but is being neglected - is the bloody conflict that Iran fought against Iraq from 1980 to 1988. It is worth recalling the fierceness of that struggle to gain some appreciation of the enormity of any decision by Washington to go to war with Iran, for it may foretell what Tehran is capable of doing when it feels its Islamic Revolution is at stake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda, a Mexican political scientist, is writing a biography of Che Guevara that will be published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf
It is, of course, only a coincidence that the same week the United States was submerged in a Beatles-inspired wave of nostalgia for the 1960s, one of the most emblematic symbols of those times, Ernesto "Che" Guevara, reappeared in the news when a Bolivian general acknowledged that the leftist revolutionary had been buried, not incinerated, in Bolivia, after he was executed for his antigovernment activities in 1967.
OPINION
December 14, 2011 | By Bruce Ackerman
Are we witnessing the birth of the United States of Europe? There are uncanny similarities between the current round of wheeling and dealing and the founding of the United States of America. The Philadelphia Convention of 1787 represented America's second try at continental union. In 1781, the 13 states had come together behind a treaty-constitution that broadly resembles present European arrangements. America's first effort was the Articles of Confederation. Like the European Union treaties, it guaranteed each citizen's right to move throughout the confederation and exercise all the economic privileges of home-staters.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Carnation Co. is in the throes of moving from its landmark headquarters in the mid-Wilshire district of Los Angeles into the largest office building in Glendale, set to open on North Brand Boulevard on Tuesday. The massive undertaking began late Wednesday and will continue through Labor Day, John R. Curd, company spokesman, said.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A new term, Kanan Keizai-Ken (South China Economic Sphere), has begun to appear in Japanese mass media in reference to Hong Kong, Taiwan and China's Guangdong and Fujian provinces. Repeating a pattern elsewhere in Asia, Japanese investments in the area are booming--overwhelming the American position in the region and reflecting what bankers and economists see as part of a bigger shift in Japanese assets to Asia, with a relative decline in emphasis on the United States and Europe.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed merger between General Electric Co. and Honeywell International Inc. is on the verge of becoming the first all-U.S. merger to be killed by European antitrust authorities after passing muster in the United States. GE and Honeywell executives admitted Thursday that their $42-billion merger was doomed because their final offer to sell a large part of Honeywell's aerospace operations did not meet the demands of European antitrust authorities.
OPINION
March 18, 2012 | By Stephen Schlesinger
With the possibility of a confrontation looming with Iran, one historical example that should command American attention in its hour of decision - but is being neglected - is the bloody conflict that Iran fought against Iraq from 1980 to 1988. It is worth recalling the fierceness of that struggle to gain some appreciation of the enormity of any decision by Washington to go to war with Iran, for it may foretell what Tehran is capable of doing when it feels its Islamic Revolution is at stake.
WORLD
June 2, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Dutch voters Wednesday dealt the proposed European constitution its second major blow in a week, fueling urgent debate in the European Union headquarters here about the future of an alliance that aspires to become a global power bloc. About 61% of Dutch voters cast ballots against the constitution in a referendum, according to partial results Wednesday night.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Steve Gutterman, Associated Press Writer
Sipping from an outsized cup at a coffee shop, his computer jargon competing with the sounds of U2 and frothing latte, software designer Yuri Bannov could almost be in Silicon Valley. Only the birch trees and babushkas outside give away his actual location: Siberia. Although Bannov lives in Akademgorodok, a faded former center of Soviet scientific might, his company does almost all its work for clients in the United States and Europe.
WORLD
June 2, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Dutch voters Wednesday dealt the proposed European constitution its second major blow in a week, fueling urgent debate in the European Union headquarters here about the future of an alliance that aspires to become a global power bloc. About 61% of Dutch voters cast ballots against the constitution in a referendum, according to partial results Wednesday night.
BOOKS
December 12, 2004 | Anthony Pagden, Anthony Pagden is professor of history and political science at UCLA and the author of many books, including "Peoples and Empires" and "European Encounters With the New World."
On Oct. 29, the leaders of the European Union's 25 member countries gathered to sign their first constitution. It still must be ratified by each nation's government, but the signing was, nevertheless, a highly significant moment. The people of Europe are now more united than at any time since Rome's golden age in the 2nd century.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Steve Gutterman, Associated Press Writer
Sipping from an outsized cup at a coffee shop, his computer jargon competing with the sounds of U2 and frothing latte, software designer Yuri Bannov could almost be in Silicon Valley. Only the birch trees and babushkas outside give away his actual location: Siberia. Although Bannov lives in Akademgorodok, a faded former center of Soviet scientific might, his company does almost all its work for clients in the United States and Europe.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed merger between General Electric Co. and Honeywell International Inc. is on the verge of becoming the first all-U.S. merger to be killed by European antitrust authorities after passing muster in the United States. GE and Honeywell executives admitted Thursday that their $42-billion merger was doomed because their final offer to sell a large part of Honeywell's aerospace operations did not meet the demands of European antitrust authorities.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE
The golf course is the last place you'd expect to find this much emotion and fervor. Somehow, the genteel world of golf, that bastion of civility and sportsmanship, now lays claim to this country's most significant biennial international competition. If the four years between Summer Olympics are too long for you to go without waving a flag and chanting "U-S-A!" the Ryder Cup is for you.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History has not been kind to U.S. Ryder Cup teams. Recent history, at least, and because we have attention spans shorter than a tee, that's all that counts. Anyway, here are the hard-luck lessons: It is 1995 at soggy Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, N.Y., and it is raining defeat. This happens even though the U.S. has one of its deepest teams, has the reigning Masters champion in Ben Crenshaw and the U.S.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE
The golf course is the last place you'd expect to find this much emotion and fervor. Somehow, the genteel world of golf, that bastion of civility and sportsmanship, now lays claim to this country's most significant biennial international competition. If the four years between Summer Olympics are too long for you to go without waving a flag and chanting "U-S-A!" the Ryder Cup is for you.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History has not been kind to U.S. Ryder Cup teams. Recent history, at least, and because we have attention spans shorter than a tee, that's all that counts. Anyway, here are the hard-luck lessons: It is 1995 at soggy Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, N.Y., and it is raining defeat. This happens even though the U.S. has one of its deepest teams, has the reigning Masters champion in Ben Crenshaw and the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A new term, Kanan Keizai-Ken (South China Economic Sphere), has begun to appear in Japanese mass media in reference to Hong Kong, Taiwan and China's Guangdong and Fujian provinces. Repeating a pattern elsewhere in Asia, Japanese investments in the area are booming--overwhelming the American position in the region and reflecting what bankers and economists see as part of a bigger shift in Japanese assets to Asia, with a relative decline in emphasis on the United States and Europe.
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