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NEWS
September 5, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6 million adults without health insurance could be covered at a cost of $23 billion a year by expanding current federal health programs for the poor, according to a report being issued today by the Clinton administration. The study claims this would be more effective than giving people tax deductions or credits to buy private insurance.
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NEWS
September 5, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6 million adults without health insurance could be covered at a cost of $23 billion a year by expanding current federal health programs for the poor, according to a report being issued today by the Clinton administration. The study claims this would be more effective than giving people tax deductions or credits to buy private insurance.
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NEWS
September 3, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In announcing on Wednesday a massive increase in government aid for wheat farmers that will help politically vital Midwestern states and a jet fighter sale that will save the jobs of Texas aerospace workers, President Bush clearly illuminated a key part of his plan for winning back disaffected voters. Bush's strategy is simple--hand out federal aid and make policy decisions that benefit important voting groups, even though it sometimes means diverging from his long-held policies.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a cliffhanger debate that has long jeopardized Los Angeles County's overstressed health care system, federal officials Tuesday cleared the way for the release of more than $1 billion that will keep clinics open and provide medical care to poor people. After a roller-coaster month of negotiations--capped last weekend by a meeting between President Clinton and county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky--federal officials agreed late Tuesday to extend a waiver of Medicaid rules for five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Four coastal cities have agreed to help pay for the first comprehensive study ever done to assess the natural and man-made impacts on the California shoreline. The Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study, being conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will analyze such coastal changes as erosion, shifting sands and altered wind and ocean currents caused by man-made jetties, piers and harbors.
NEWS
February 26, 1988
The Reagan Administration urged Congress to end financial sanctions against states that do not comply with the 55-m.p.h. national speed limit. Richard Morgan, executive director of the Federal Highway Administration, told a Senate transportation subcommittee that the Administration "would prefer giving all authority for setting speed limits back to states." Congress last year voted to retain the national speed limit at 55 m.p.h.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The federal government's system for apportioning $60 billion a year for science and technology is far too haphazard and needs strengthening in the White House and Congress, the National Academies of Science and Engineering and the Institute of Medicine said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The bitter battle over government sponsorship of controversial works of art will shift next week to the House of Representatives, where Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) is leading a hard-fought campaign to ban taxpayer support for "obscene or indecent" artwork. Crusading for a cause championed by conservative Sen. Jesse A. Helms (R-N.C.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
Public officials throughout California have condemned a U.S. Senate vote Thursday to exclude illegal aliens from the 1990 census, saying the action will shortchange California in Congress and possibly deprive the state of millions of dollars of federal aid for medical emergency services and other programs for poor people. "I think it's an outrageous piece of legislation and probably unconstitutional," Assemblyman Peter Chacon said Friday.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government should not bar newly legalized immigrants from community social programs while allowing illegal aliens access to the same programs, the commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service said Thursday. The assertion by INS Commissioner Gene McNary allies him with Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Jack Kemp in a growing flap over immigration policy caused by Costa Mesa's plan to deny government funds to groups that serve illegal aliens.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In announcing on Wednesday a massive increase in government aid for wheat farmers that will help politically vital Midwestern states and a jet fighter sale that will save the jobs of Texas aerospace workers, President Bush clearly illuminated a key part of his plan for winning back disaffected voters. Bush's strategy is simple--hand out federal aid and make policy decisions that benefit important voting groups, even though it sometimes means diverging from his long-held policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Four coastal cities have agreed to help pay for the first comprehensive study ever done to assess the natural and man-made impacts on the California shoreline. The Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study, being conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will analyze such coastal changes as erosion, shifting sands and altered wind and ocean currents caused by man-made jetties, piers and harbors.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government should not bar newly legalized immigrants from community social programs while allowing illegal aliens access to the same programs, the commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service said Thursday. The assertion by INS Commissioner Gene McNary allies him with Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Jack Kemp in a growing flap over immigration policy caused by Costa Mesa's plan to deny government funds to groups that serve illegal aliens.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Senate subcommittee begins hearings today on renewal of the National Endowment for the Arts' legislative franchise with the future of the federal arts agency significantly influenced by one short press conference statement by President Bush.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The bitter battle over government sponsorship of controversial works of art will shift next week to the House of Representatives, where Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) is leading a hard-fought campaign to ban taxpayer support for "obscene or indecent" artwork. Crusading for a cause championed by conservative Sen. Jesse A. Helms (R-N.C.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
Public officials throughout California have condemned a U.S. Senate vote Thursday to exclude illegal aliens from the 1990 census, saying the action will shortchange California in Congress and possibly deprive the state of millions of dollars of federal aid for medical emergency services and other programs for poor people. "I think it's an outrageous piece of legislation and probably unconstitutional," Assemblyman Peter Chacon said Friday.
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators are close to arranging a $5-billion rescue of five hard-hit Texas savings and loans, industry sources said late Tuesday. If the deal goes through, it would be the second-costliest bailout ever by U.S. thrift regulators. Negotiating to acquire the thrifts with the federal assistance is the investment group MacAndrews & Forbes Holding. It is headed by Ronald O. Perelman, a takeover specialist well-known on Wall Street who also is chairman of Revlon Inc., the cosmetics company.
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Nearly half the nation's elderly would be living below the poverty line without Social Security and other government payments, according to a Census Bureau study released Tuesday. The study, which assessed poverty rates under a variety of hypothetical definitions, found that the nation's reported 1986 poverty rate of 13.
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