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April 26, 2002 | Helene Elliott
The U.S. Figure Skating Assn., saying it feels compelled to "redeem the reputation of this great sport" in the wake of the Salt Lake City judging controversy, said Thursday it will propose a three-pronged reform initiative at the International Skating Union Congress in Japan in early June. The proposal, as announced by USFSA President Phyllis Howard, would address the current judging system, the selection of international judges and the sanctioning of judges.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2002 | Helene Elliott
The U.S. Figure Skating Assn., saying it feels compelled to "redeem the reputation of this great sport" in the wake of the Salt Lake City judging controversy, said Thursday it will propose a three-pronged reform initiative at the International Skating Union Congress in Japan in early June. The proposal, as announced by USFSA President Phyllis Howard, would address the current judging system, the selection of international judges and the sanctioning of judges.
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SPORTS
February 4, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Olympic Committee executive board members are following the Tonya Harding affair from a distance of about 5,000 miles, which, as far as they are concerned, is close enough. While acknowledging that they have had numerous informal discussions about whether the U.S. figure skater should be allowed to participate in the fast-approaching Winter Olympics, the topic is not on the agenda for the three-day executive board meeting that begins here today.
SPORTS
January 22, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The moment the last triple salchow was landed and the last quadruple loop was looped at this week's U.S. figure skating championships, preparations intensified for next year's competition, to be held at Staples Center and the Sports Arena Jan. 6-13. Although a year seems ample time to get ready, preliminary planning has long been underway for the first U.S. championships in Los Angeles since 1954 and first in Southern California since San Diego hosted the event in 1981.
SPORTS
February 3, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michelle Kwan of Torrance has been notified by U.S. Figure Skating Assn. officials that they will send her a plane ticket. They have not, however, told her when or where she is going. Although the association announced Wednesday that Kwan will travel to Norway to train for the Feb. 12-27 Winter Olympics, officials acknowledged that they have to work out numerous details, including her exact destination.
SPORTS
March 8, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking a repeat of their legal victory that enabled figure skater Tonya Harding to compete in the Winter Olympics, her lawyers returned to court Monday in an attempt to assure her a berth in this month's World Championships. They filed papers in Oregon's Multnomah County Circuit Court, requesting a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction that would prevent the U.S. Figure Skating Assn.
SPORTS
March 9, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
While Tonya Harding observed, U.S. District Judge Owen Panner said Tuesday that he would rule today on whether to grant a temporary restraining order that would delay possible disciplinary action against her by the U.S. Figure Skating Assn. After listening to arguments for almost two hours in a Portland, Ore., court, Panner called for a recess. A five-member USFSA panel is scheduled to begin a hearing Thursday in Colorado Springs, Colo.
SPORTS
January 29, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now, at week's end, perhaps a forthright comparison to a three-ring circus is in order--call it the spectacle of American women's figure skating, under the Portland Big Top. Out in the suburbs is Tonya Harding, for everyone to see, in an all-out public relations press to save her place on the U.S. Olympic figure skating team. On Friday she's smiling, she's playing, she's telling the country she's just ordinary folk, but can be a lady when she needs to be.
SPORTS
January 22, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 25 members of the U.S. Figure Skating Assn.'s international committee met after the women's championship Saturday night at the San Jose Arena, the discussion was about whether 1995 national champion and world bronze-medalist Nicole Bobek should be granted an injury waiver into this year's world championships. But that was not the issue. If it had been, based on recent precedents involving national champions, the decision would have been a slam dunk for Bobek.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tears welling in her eyes and her lips quivering, Tonya Harding confessed Thursday that she knew about the plot to attack rival Nancy Kerrigan after the fact and did not report it to police. But Harding steadfastly said she was not involved and knew nothing of the assault beforehand. She pleaded, all but begged to remain on the U.S. Olympic team. "I have devoted my entire life to one objective: winning an Olympic gold medal for my country. This is my last chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people have heard horror stories of children barely out of diapers being pushed onto the ice by overbearing coaches and desperate parents seeking Olympic gold. Julie Gidlow once fit that stereotype, rising to skate at dawn, practicing her camel spins and double lutzes while classmates did the "moonwalk" at school dances. So at the ripe old age of 18 (practically elderly in the professional skating world), Gidlow quit the rink. "I went to college," she said.
SPORTS
January 22, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 25 members of the U.S. Figure Skating Assn.'s international committee met after the women's championship Saturday night at the San Jose Arena, the discussion was about whether 1995 national champion and world bronze-medalist Nicole Bobek should be granted an injury waiver into this year's world championships. But that was not the issue. If it had been, based on recent precedents involving national champions, the decision would have been a slam dunk for Bobek.
SPORTS
March 10, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flushed with success from a victory in the courtroom Wednesday, figure skater Tonya Harding predicted that her next one will come on the ice. "Cool. Cool," Harding said upon learning that she apparently will be allowed to represent the United States in the March 20-27 World Championships in Chiba, Japan. "I'm going to win this time." Harding was eighth in the recent Winter Olympics, but she might not even have been there if her lawyers had not reached a settlement with the U.S.
SPORTS
March 9, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
While Tonya Harding observed, U.S. District Judge Owen Panner said Tuesday that he would rule today on whether to grant a temporary restraining order that would delay possible disciplinary action against her by the U.S. Figure Skating Assn. After listening to arguments for almost two hours in a Portland, Ore., court, Panner called for a recess. A five-member USFSA panel is scheduled to begin a hearing Thursday in Colorado Springs, Colo.
SPORTS
March 8, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking a repeat of their legal victory that enabled figure skater Tonya Harding to compete in the Winter Olympics, her lawyers returned to court Monday in an attempt to assure her a berth in this month's World Championships. They filed papers in Oregon's Multnomah County Circuit Court, requesting a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction that would prevent the U.S. Figure Skating Assn.
SPORTS
February 24, 1994 | MIKE KUPPER
Lots of people will look back on these Winter Olympics as an unforgettable experience. Then there's Kristin Matta. "I've had better vacations," she said. Matta, director of communications for the U.S. Figure Skating Assn., is the U.S. Olympic team's press attache for figure skating at the Games. That assignment, of course, has thrust her in the middle of the never-ending Tonya Harding-Nancy Kerrigan saga. She probably has been the most in-demand person at these Olympics.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Members of Tonya Harding's camp came forward Sunday to say the young ice skater "categorically denies" accusations that she was involved in an assault on one of her rivals and that she would not quit in her quest for the Olympic gold. Meanwhile, U.S. Olympic Committee officials, who appeared Saturday to be moving toward a decision to remove Harding from the U.S. team for the Feb. 12-27 Winter Games in Norway, decided during a meeting Sunday in Durham, N.C.
SPORTS
January 29, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now, at week's end, perhaps a forthright comparison to a three-ring circus is in order--call it the spectacle of American women's figure skating, under the Portland Big Top. Out in the suburbs is Tonya Harding, for everyone to see, in an all-out public relations press to save her place on the U.S. Olympic figure skating team. On Friday she's smiling, she's playing, she's telling the country she's just ordinary folk, but can be a lady when she needs to be.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tonya Harding moved one step closer Saturday to possible expulsion from the U.S. Olympic team when a U.S. Figure Skating Assn. panel unanimously called for a disciplinary hearing to determine the extent of her role in the Jan. 6 attack on rival Nancy Kerrigan. The panel's hearing procedure allows 30 days for Harding to respond to its statement of charges. The figure skating team is officially named on Feb. 21, so that leaves the decision on Harding's participation in the hands of the U.S.
SPORTS
February 5, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A member of the U.S. Figure Skating Assn. panel that might ultimately decide Tonya Harding's fate said Friday that individual rights should take precedence over Olympic ideals. Speaking after five hours of deliberations at El Pomar Center, near the USFSA offices, panel member Sharon Watson said the group was doing everything possible to protect Harding's rights. Harding has not been charged with a crime, so maintaining that philosophy could improve her chances of skating in the Olympics.
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