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United States Foreign Aid

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NEWS
June 30, 1995 | ART PINE and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, unable to persuade Congress to help finance a European rapid-reaction force being assembled to protect U.N. peacekeeping troops in Bosnia-Herzegovina, said Thursday that he will unilaterally use $95 million in emergency funds to support the allied effort.
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NEWS
April 21, 2002 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States secured commitments from other wealthy countries Saturday for better cooperation in the crackdown on terrorist finances but found itself under fire on other fronts at a weekend gathering of world finance officials. As protesters took to the streets to denounce the Bush administration's international priorities, delegates attending the spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank were taking their own shots at U.S. policy.
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NEWS
February 1, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is readying a fiscal 1992 defense budget that would continue the cutback in military spending begun last year, despite the stepped-up war in the Persian Gulf and recent setbacks in the Soviet Union's move toward democratic reforms. The new spending plan, to be disclosed on Monday, is expected to propose cutting military outlays by a sharp 3.3% after inflation, reducing further the number of military personnel and canceling two key nuclear missile programs.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Two Senate Republicans pledged to seek $500 million more in federal money to fight AIDS overseas. Sens. Jesse Helms of North Carolina and Bill Frist of Tennessee said Sunday that they want to add the money to the Bush administration's spending request to pay for the war on terrorism. The increase would be earmarked to make treatment available for every HIV-positive pregnant woman, said Helms, ranking member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. "There is no reason why we cannot eliminate .
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, who has sought to have every American classroom hooked up to the Internet by the end of next year, proposed on Sunday a vast increase in the developing world's access to computers, cellular telephones and the World Wide Web to help jump-start struggling economies. Citing what he said is the need to eliminate the "digital divide" between rich and poor, Clinton said: "The people in Africa are no different from the people in America.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White House budget negotiators, all but resolving the thorniest issue holding up enactment of major spending bills for the new fiscal year, agreed Sunday to accept some limits on the use of U.S. contributions to international institutions in support of abortion activities abroad. In return, congressional Republicans approved giving President Clinton some of the money he had sought to make overdue U.S. payments to the United Nations.
NEWS
November 20, 1999
Here are key elements of the federal budget for fiscal 2000: * Boosts defense spending by $17.3 billion over last year, to $267.7 billion; provisions include a 4.8% pay hike for active-duty military personnel on Jan. 1. * Provides $1.3 billion to continue President Clinton's centerpiece proposal to hire 100,000 more teachers for the nation's schools. * Authorizes $595 million for the first installment of Clinton's proposal to hire up to 50,000 more police officers. * Provides $27.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration and congressional Republicans struck a deal Thursday night on a $15.3-billion foreign aid bill in a breakthrough both sides think will help speed agreement on their remaining budget disputes. House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) said that though some details were still being worked out, he planned for the House to vote on the package today. "This is the key that opens us up to negotiate" the rest of the pending battles, Hastert said.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
The House narrowly passed a $12.6-billion fiscal 2000 foreign aid bill Tuesday that the White House has threatened to veto on grounds that it shortchanges vital international programs. The bill was approved, 214 to 211, all but ensuring that a veto would be sustained. The Senate has yet to take up the bill, which is a compromise version of legislation passed earlier by both chambers.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush declared Wednesday that Mexico, Colombia and 18 other drug-producing countries are cooperating fully with the United States in the war on narcotics, despite increases in the worldwide cultivation of marijuana and the crops that are made into heroin and cocaine. It was Bush's first venture into the diplomatically sensitive subject of drug certification.
NEWS
March 23, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With missionary zeal, President Bush on Friday sought to redefine the terms of foreign aid, as he called on scores of world leaders to join him in a new U.S. funding initiative that requires developing nations to commit to free trade, political liberty and human rights. In an address here at the United Nations Conference on Financing for Development, the president denounced "a failed status quo" that provides aid without measuring results.
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
The House voted Tuesday to protect money for fighting drugs in South America from lawmakers who argued that foreign aid dollars would be better spent against AIDS and other world health problems.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A deeply split House on Wednesday endorsed President Bush's order to ban U.S. aid to international family planning groups that perform abortions or take any step to promote them, such as discussing the procedure as an option for clients. However, the 218-210 vote showed that foes of the policy had gained some ground in the House since last year and that Bush likely will continue to face political challenges on the aid issue and other abortion-related fights.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Without fanfare or public notice, President Bush signed a special memorandum barring U.S. foreign aid to family planning groups involved in abortion. "It's been done. It will be in the Federal Register" today, a White House spokesman said. The action was designed to quietly preempt abortion rights proponents in Congress who hoped to overturn Bush's policy of denying U.S. aid to family planning groups that also do abortion counseling and lobbying with their own private funds.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite millions of dollars in U.S. aid, the leading Iraqi opposition group has proved so hapless in making use of the money, accounting for it, finding recruits for Pentagon training and preventing its own fragmentation that the State Department is searching for alternatives. The Iraqi National Congress is also now so out of favor in the Arab world and in Turkey that all but one of the states bordering Iraq have made clear to Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and other U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush told visiting Salvadoran President Francisco Flores on Friday that the United States will give undocumented Salvadoran immigrants immunity from deportation for 18 months because of the devastating earthquakes that recently hit the Central American country. Bush also pledged more than $100 million in U.S. assistance over the next year and a half for reconstruction efforts in El Salvador.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | THOMAS W. LIPPMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Directed by Congress to pursue more vigorous efforts to bring down Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, the Clinton administration has responded with a detailed, 27-page plan to rebuild Iraq's shattered political opposition and prepare a case for a possible war crimes indictment of Iraqi leaders.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration ran into heavy congressional resistance Thursday to increasing the overall resources of the International Monetary Fund, suggesting that the White House still has considerable lobbying left to do if the measure is to pass. At a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) urged the administration to press for "fundamental reform" of the 182-country organization in return for congressional approval of the president's request.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush declared Wednesday that Mexico, Colombia and 18 other drug-producing countries are cooperating fully with the United States in the war on narcotics, despite increases in the worldwide cultivation of marijuana and the crops that are made into heroin and cocaine. It was Bush's first venture into the diplomatically sensitive subject of drug certification.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bipartisan group of lawmakers launched a bid Thursday to overturn President Bush's ban on giving federal funds to international family planning groups that use other funds to pay for abortion-related activity. Backing the effort are several international health organizations concerned that the ban will force them to halt efforts encouraging their countries to liberalize abortion laws to reduce the number of women who die from illegal abortions.
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