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United States Foreign Aid Afghanistan

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NEWS
July 26, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration denied a report Wednesday that the United States and the Soviet Union have reached an agreement on settling the war in Afghanistan, but officials pointed to significant progress in resolving the conflict. A television broadcast saying that a deal was completed is a "product of the rumor mill," said Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who is traveling in Asia and will meet with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze in Irkutsk next week.
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NEWS
December 25, 2001 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon stopped emergency airdrops of food and other humanitarian supplies to stranded civilian communities in Afghanistan on Monday, saying most such supplies can now be delivered by road. Giant C-17 cargo planes had dropped pallets of food, tents, blankets, winter clothing and other relief supplies since the U.S. air war began in October. The aid program began with great fanfare but soon dwindled to about two deliveries a day. Overall, U.S.
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NEWS
January 4, 1988
Two high-ranking Reagan Administration officials will hold talks in Pakistan on a range of issues including Afghanistan, a State Department spokesman said. Under Secretary of State Michael H. Armacost and Robert Oakley, Middle East director of the National Security Council staff, left Saturday for Pakistan, the spokesman added.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, the U.S. government sent hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of aid--mostly bombs, guns, bullets and other weaponry--to assorted Afghan resistance groups. Now, as its former clients prepare to take power in Kabul, the Bush Administration can do little more than watch nervously from the sidelines. U.S.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, the U.S. government sent hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of aid--mostly bombs, guns, bullets and other weaponry--to assorted Afghan resistance groups. Now, as its former clients prepare to take power in Kabul, the Bush Administration can do little more than watch nervously from the sidelines. U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Important gains" have been made in cutting back coca planting and seizing cocaine, the State Department emphasized in its annual drug control report released Saturday, while playing down setbacks in the fight against narcotics. "We can't respond to what will be inevitable setbacks or blips in our record of progress by ripping apart the strategy and starting all over again," said Melvyn Levitsky, assistant secretary of state for international narcotics.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
The announcement that the Soviet Union and the United States have agreed to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan may signal the winding up of the bloodiest conflict of the 1980s. The History An April, 1978, revolution brought the Communists to power, and by late the next year the Soviet Union had begin a massive airlift of men and armor to save the tottering Kabul regime.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet-backed Afghan government said Saturday it is ready to stop the war against Western-supported guerrillas and endorsed Friday's U.S.-Soviet agreement to halt all weapons supplies to the warring sides by Jan. 1. But radical Muslim guerrillas said they will continue fighting to topple President Najibullah's government in Kabul. Afghan Premier Fazlul Haq Khaleqyar has "expressed full readiness to ensure peace and cessation of the war as well as implementation of the Soviet-U.S.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a concerted effort to pressure the Soviet Union to help defuse regional conflicts, the United States and Saudi Arabia have agreed to provide $715 million to fund CIA covert aid to the moujahedeen resistance in Afghanistan, according to informed sources. The aid, which will be used primarily to provide military equipment and supplies over the next three months, is designed to nearly match an estimated $250 million a month in assistance that U.S.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Millions of dollars in U.S. aid money earmarked for the reconstruction of Afghanistan have been squandered through mismanagement, inefficiency and political miscalculations by the U.N. office in charge of the project, according to independent relief agencies, Afghan professionals, U.N. workers and Western diplomats. The program was begun in October, 1988, as an ambitious, billion-dollar international effort to rebuild Afghanistan after a decade of war.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Important gains" have been made in cutting back coca planting and seizing cocaine, the State Department emphasized in its annual drug control report released Saturday, while playing down setbacks in the fight against narcotics. "We can't respond to what will be inevitable setbacks or blips in our record of progress by ripping apart the strategy and starting all over again," said Melvyn Levitsky, assistant secretary of state for international narcotics.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet-backed Afghan government said Saturday it is ready to stop the war against Western-supported guerrillas and endorsed Friday's U.S.-Soviet agreement to halt all weapons supplies to the warring sides by Jan. 1. But radical Muslim guerrillas said they will continue fighting to topple President Najibullah's government in Kabul. Afghan Premier Fazlul Haq Khaleqyar has "expressed full readiness to ensure peace and cessation of the war as well as implementation of the Soviet-U.S.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
The announcement that the Soviet Union and the United States have agreed to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan may signal the winding up of the bloodiest conflict of the 1980s. The History An April, 1978, revolution brought the Communists to power, and by late the next year the Soviet Union had begin a massive airlift of men and armor to save the tottering Kabul regime.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Najibullah, one of the world's last Soviet-backed totalitarian leaders, says he has no intention of stepping down, despite the fall of the hard-liners in the Kremlin and the KGB who put him in power and the imminent prospect of an end to his arms supplies from Moscow.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and the United States agreed Friday to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan as of Jan. 1, opening the way for a negotiated end to a 13-year civil war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 12 years of surrogate warfare with the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, the United States intends to press for new cooperation from Moscow to end the bloodshed that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and sapped billions of dollars from both countries for weapons. The determination to resolve one of the world's bloodiest civil wars has been fueled by the dramatic political upheaval in the Soviet Union after the failed coup.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a long way from home, this dark, lanky Afghan in the flowing white clothes and bushy, untrimmed beard. As a devout Muslim, he is nervous to be photographed walking along the boardwalk at Laguna Beach, worried that the background will feature the oiled flesh of half-naked sunbathers, concerned that the photo won't play well in Peshawar. That worry, though, is gnat-sized compared to the monstrous problem that brought Mirwais Wardak here from Pakistan.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration denied a report Wednesday that the United States and the Soviet Union have reached an agreement on settling the war in Afghanistan, but officials pointed to significant progress in resolving the conflict. A television broadcast saying that a deal was completed is a "product of the rumor mill," said Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who is traveling in Asia and will meet with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze in Irkutsk next week.
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