Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Aid Africa
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Aid Africa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Reuters
Clasping hands and singing "We Shall Overcome," black Americans and their African cousins ended an emotional reunion Friday, pledging to rebuild the bonds destroyed by slavery and colonization. Prominent leaders of the 35 million American blacks promised to press their government to cancel all official debts owed by the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. "We say to Americans: If you can cancel debt for Poland and Egypt, you can cancel it for sub-Saharan Africa," the Rev.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton signed into law Saturday bipartisan legislation that pledges more than $400 million to fight AIDS and other infectious diseases in Africa and around the world. "In our tightly connected world, infectious disease anywhere is a threat to public health everywhere," Clinton said in his weekly radio address, which he delivered before he signed the bill in Lake Placid, N.Y., where the first family is vacationing.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Bush, offering a preview of his visit next week to Poland and Hungary, declared Thursday that he would stress his "strong support for the democratic course these nations have chosen" but would avoid raising tensions or driving a wedge between the Soviet Union and its allies.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton agreed with South African President Thabo Mbeki on Monday that the United States and other wealthy countries must do their part to help reverse the spread of AIDS in Africa, both by reducing the cost of drugs and by alleviating the poverty that contributes to the epidemic.
NEWS
July 2, 1987
The Senate approved legislation to bar U.S. aid to countries in southern Africa that support the South African guerrilla practice of "necklacing," the killing of blacks suspected of cooperating with South African authorities by burning them alive in rubber tires. The measure--less restrictive than an earlier version approved by the Senate in May--goes to President Reagan, who has indicated that he will sign it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1990 | SHELBY GRAD
At first, the students who filled the University High School gym Tuesday seemed a bit skeptical. A rally to kick off a monthlong hunger relief campaign had just begun and some of the 300 or so students in the audience continued to talk and even shout comments during the presentation.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed controversial trade legislation Wednesday designed to aid poor countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite vigorous opposition from some American blacks and liberals who fear that it would threaten low-wage jobs in the United States. The measure, approved 233-186, would grant full access to U.S. markets--free of most import quotas or duties--to those sub-Saharan African countries that are deemed to be moving toward democracy and free-market economies.
NEWS
January 3, 1987 | United Press International
Despite a rise in agricultural production, Africa faces a severe economic crisis in 1987 marked by heavy debt burdens, the collapse of commodity prices and cuts in U.S. aid, a U.N. official said Friday. At a press conference in the Ethiopian capital, Adebayo Adedeji, executive secretary of the U.N. Economic Commission for Africa, said adverse conditions in 1986 caused the economic growth rate to drop to 1.2%. That was below the average population growth rate, estimated at nearly 3%.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton agreed with South African President Thabo Mbeki on Monday that the United States and other wealthy countries must do their part to help reverse the spread of AIDS in Africa, both by reducing the cost of drugs and by alleviating the poverty that contributes to the epidemic.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the AIDS epidemic continues to ravage sub-Saharan Africa, President Clinton issued an executive order Wednesday meant to help nations in the impoverished region obtain inexpensive drugs and medical technologies to treat the disease. The presidential order, which could be overturned after Clinton leaves office in January, would bar the U.S.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed controversial trade legislation Wednesday designed to aid poor countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite vigorous opposition from some American blacks and liberals who fear that it would threaten low-wage jobs in the United States. The measure, approved 233-186, would grant full access to U.S. markets--free of most import quotas or duties--to those sub-Saharan African countries that are deemed to be moving toward democracy and free-market economies.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could be a worldwide model for dealing with regional conflicts, Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Thursday called on Africa's leaders to deal with their continent's problems by creating a multinational rapid deployment force. The unit would provide peacekeepers and humanitarian relief for wars and disasters, beginning with the building crisis of ethnic-based hatreds in Burundi.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warren Christopher's visit to Africa this week--the first by a U.S. secretary of state in the post-Cold War era--has become such a big deal that it prompted a banner headline, "Welcome Warren," across the top half of the front page of one newspaper here. An entire road--in a poor country larger than California and Texas combined, where 95% of the roads are just dirt tracks and there is not a single highway--was graded to ease his trip to a rural Peace Corps post.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the torpid heat of the Mozambican summer, in a village far from paved roads and running water, National Security Adviser Anthony Lake sat on a stool and heard the story of fisherman Jose Chemane Bizho--the simple story of Africa's fragile hopes and frightful danger. "When I was young," said the bearded fisherman, "I joined the army for two years. But I fought on for 17. Today, I want my own fishing project. I'm looking for somebody to support me and buy me some nets."
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The glow of goodwill that the Clinton Administration hoped would follow the unveiling of its South African aid package has been dimmed by complaints that it apparently will rely in part on money diverted from other struggling African nations. At a White House meeting Tuesday to discuss the all-race elections in South Africa and plans for U.S. aid, some lawmakers and pro-African groups told President Clinton of their concerns that the diversion of funds would set back other sub-Saharan countries.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, arriving here early today at the start of a six-nation tour of Africa, said hard-pressed African economies can do themselves more good by emphasizing private enterprise than by waiting for U.S. foreign aid. Talking to reporters shortly before his Air Force jetliner landed at Dakar, Shultz said some past programs damaged the recipient nations because donated food and other commodities discouraged local production.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the torpid heat of the Mozambican summer, in a village far from paved roads and running water, National Security Adviser Anthony Lake sat on a stool and heard the story of fisherman Jose Chemane Bizho--the simple story of Africa's fragile hopes and frightful danger. "When I was young," said the bearded fisherman, "I joined the army for two years. But I fought on for 17. Today, I want my own fishing project. I'm looking for somebody to support me and buy me some nets."
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Reuters
Clasping hands and singing "We Shall Overcome," black Americans and their African cousins ended an emotional reunion Friday, pledging to rebuild the bonds destroyed by slavery and colonization. Prominent leaders of the 35 million American blacks promised to press their government to cancel all official debts owed by the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. "We say to Americans: If you can cancel debt for Poland and Egypt, you can cancel it for sub-Saharan Africa," the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1990 | SHELBY GRAD
At first, the students who filled the University High School gym Tuesday seemed a bit skeptical. A rally to kick off a monthlong hunger relief campaign had just begun and some of the 300 or so students in the audience continued to talk and even shout comments during the presentation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|