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United States Foreign Aid Bolivia

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NEWS
February 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday he will not revise his formula for a joint U.S.-Soviet military reduction in Europe even though the Soviets have rejected the idea because it would leave U.S. forces with an additional 30,000 troops. Pointing to the geographical advantage the Soviet Union would have in redeploying units to Central and Eastern Europe west of Soviet borders, Bush said that "we've got a big ocean between us and . . . Western Europe" that would delay a speedy redeployment.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juana Choque, a 39-year-old woman who migrated to La Paz from rural Bolivia, recently got the first bank loan of her life, $100 to expand her sidewalk vending business. "I want to become a big businesswoman, like the other senoras ," said Choque with a gleam in her eye. In a country where annual income averages $800, the loan could go a long way toward helping Choque expand her inventory of fresh vegetables, even enable her to rent a second sentaje, or vending site.
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NEWS
November 13, 1988
Despite funding of more than $100 million in the past four years, U.S. anti-drug efforts in Colombia and Bolivia have been almost entirely ineffective and the cultivation of drug crops has increased dramatically in both countries, according to a General Accounting Office report. The strongly worded report contrasts sharply with State Department claims that programs being funded through its Bureau of International Narcotics Matters are achieving some success in Latin America.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After President Bush's drug summit with Latin American leaders this week, prospects for cutting off the flow of cocaine at its source seem as bleak as ever. Although the six presidents at the Thursday meeting in San Antonio proclaimed a "new spirit of cooperation," Bush obviously was at odds with at least some of the others over anti-drug strategy. Their differences, in essence, are about guns versus butter.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juana Choque, a 39-year-old woman who migrated to La Paz from rural Bolivia, recently got the first bank loan of her life, $100 to expand her sidewalk vending business. "I want to become a big businesswoman, like the other senoras ," said Choque with a gleam in her eye. In a country where annual income averages $800, the loan could go a long way toward helping Choque expand her inventory of fresh vegetables, even enable her to rent a second sentaje, or vending site.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years after President Bush launched his "Andean strategy" to attack the supply of cocaine at its overseas source, the effort is wobbling noticeably and raising questions about whether its multimillion-dollar budget would be better spent elsewhere. The plan, which gives large aid infusions to the Andean nations of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru to beef up law enforcement and military strength there and to wean the nations' economies from drug production, has enjoyed crucial bipartisan support.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Administration's new Andean strategy, which calls for giving more narcotics-fighting aid to Peru and Bolivia, could be slowed by demands of those nations that the program include an immediate increase in economic assistance, officials said Friday. The demands conflict with an Administration timetable that would delay any new economic aid until at least 1992 and furnish that aid only if Bolivia and Peru make significant progress in the anti-drug effort.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After President Bush's drug summit with Latin American leaders this week, prospects for cutting off the flow of cocaine at its source seem as bleak as ever. Although the six presidents at the Thursday meeting in San Antonio proclaimed a "new spirit of cooperation," Bush obviously was at odds with at least some of the others over anti-drug strategy. Their differences, in essence, are about guns versus butter.
NEWS
April 16, 1989
Bolivia's coca-leaf producers announced they will suspend a U.S.-backed crop substitution program and continue growing the plant used to make cocaine. Delegates of the Coca Growers Federation, which represents about 300,000 peasants, announced at the end of a three-day meeting that they will not abide by the voluntary program begun last year until the government makes good on its promise to develop other crops and to provide electricity, roads, education and health facilities in rural areas.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and the leaders of six Latin American nations proclaimed a "new spirit of cooperation" in the war on drugs Thursday, but they disagreed publicly over how to proceed in an effort that they conceded is far from successful. They also sought to reduce their reliance on Latin American armies to fight the war--a step that appeared to be a retreat from a three-year Bush Administration initiative.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years after President Bush launched his "Andean strategy" to attack the supply of cocaine at its overseas source, the effort is wobbling noticeably and raising questions about whether its multimillion-dollar budget would be better spent elsewhere. The plan, which gives large aid infusions to the Andean nations of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru to beef up law enforcement and military strength there and to wean the nations' economies from drug production, has enjoyed crucial bipartisan support.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | JANINE DeFAO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's two-year effort to cut off the cocaine supply from three South American countries has been badly managed and has produced few results, government auditors said Wednesday in a searing indictment of the Andean anti-drug strategy.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Coca prices have collapsed in Peru and Bolivia, giving the United States an unprecedented opportunity to strike the traffic in cocaine at its source by helping farmers say no. A crackdown on drug lords in Colombia and tougher enforcement in Peru and Bolivia have reduced demand for coca leaves, the source of cocaine, and prices have come down as a result. Now, thousands of farmers are looking for alternate crops and for help to make the switch.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, shocked by the sight of Bolivian anti-narcotics police carrying World War I-era weapons held together by tape, said Tuesday that a congressional ban on U.S. arms supplies to the South American nation must be eased to help combat its massive cocaine trade.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday he will not revise his formula for a joint U.S.-Soviet military reduction in Europe even though the Soviets have rejected the idea because it would leave U.S. forces with an additional 30,000 troops. Pointing to the geographical advantage the Soviet Union would have in redeploying units to Central and Eastern Europe west of Soviet borders, Bush said that "we've got a big ocean between us and . . . Western Europe" that would delay a speedy redeployment.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Administration's new Andean strategy, which calls for giving more narcotics-fighting aid to Peru and Bolivia, could be slowed by demands of those nations that the program include an immediate increase in economic assistance, officials said Friday. The demands conflict with an Administration timetable that would delay any new economic aid until at least 1992 and furnish that aid only if Bolivia and Peru make significant progress in the anti-drug effort.
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