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United States Foreign Aid Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
March 2, 1993 | LAURA SILBER and ART PINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Pentagon said Monday that its first humanitarian airdrop into eastern Bosnia was a success but that the mountainous, tree-covered terrain apparently made many of the crates difficult to locate, and they had to be pinpointed by American spy satellites. Officials said that three unarmed C-130 cargo planes, flying from the U.S.
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NEWS
February 29, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key World Bank official is warning the United States of "serious consequences" in Bosnia-Herzegovina if Congress does not appropriate money for that war-ravaged country's reconstruction by early April. The lack of a U.S. appropriation, he said, probably would force the cancellation of a meeting of the foreign ministers of donor countries scheduled for April 12-13 in Brussels. Cancellation would lengthen the delay that already has hampered reconstruction.
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NEWS
July 4, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. planes boosted the international mission to rescue starving Sarajevo by flying in tons of food and supplies Friday, but a European Community envoy failed to persuade the warring factions to resume peace talks that could end the ever-broadening Balkan conflict. It was the first full day of a humanitarian airlift to Sarajevo made possible by the deployment of more than 1,000 U.N. peacekeeping troops to secure and defend the airport.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the spotlight is on the deployment of troops to Bosnia, President Clinton and other policymakers are now also calling attention to the host of unheralded civilian programs that may be as crucial as the military operation in determining whether long-term peace takes hold.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | Times Wire Services
The United States announced Thursday that weather permitting, it will resume relief flights to the besieged Bosnian capital of Sarajevo on Saturday. The airlift to Sarajevo was halted Sept. 3 after an Italian relief plane was downed by a surface-to-air missile. Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said the warring parties have given "general assurances of free flight, no attack" to international mediators in the region.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
An American plane landed here Saturday bringing badly needed food and the promise that a full-fledged international airlift would resume after a monthlong suspension. Bad weather, however, forced a second U.S. aircraft to divert to the Croatian capital, Zagreb, on two separate, unsuccessful attempts to deliver supplies, U.N. officials at Zagreb airport said.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Four U.S. and Canadian planes carrying food and medicine landed at Sarajevo's shell-scarred airport Sunday, and the U.N. refugee agency said it hopes more loads of urgently needed supplies will arrive today. The airlift to the Serbian-besieged Bosnian capital was halted for the day shortly after noon, because of bad weather rather than the occasional crackle of gun and mortar fire that could be heard from the airport.
NEWS
December 1, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Tuesday that the United States will spend an additional $150 million to deliver relief supplies to beleaguered towns in Bosnia-Herzegovina this winter, although U.S. officials said there is no need for military action to break the siege. "This winter, the snows have come early to Bosnia and the humanitarian crisis has deepened," Christopher told foreign ministers of the 52-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE).
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Friday the U.S. government is seriously considering a U.N. request to send heavy helicopters to evacuate seriously wounded civilians from a besieged Bosnian town, a step that would bring American air crews into range of Serbian artillery. The urgent request by U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata forces the Clinton Administration to confront head-on the Pentagon's reluctance to commit U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1992 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling on Americans to open their eyes to the "genocide" in his homeland, the head of the Red Crescent relief effort in Bosnia-Herzegovina made a brief stop in Orange County on Tuesday to meet with local Muslim leaders and to seek donations of food and medicine. "I come here to ask Americans to do something to stop this aggression against humanity," said Izet Aganovic, president of the Islamic equivalent of the Red Cross. "Children are being killed, people are in concentration camps . . .
NEWS
December 1, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Tuesday that the United States will spend an additional $150 million to deliver relief supplies to beleaguered towns in Bosnia-Herzegovina this winter, although U.S. officials said there is no need for military action to break the siege. "This winter, the snows have come early to Bosnia and the humanitarian crisis has deepened," Christopher told foreign ministers of the 52-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE).
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | From Associated Press
While the U.S. government and its Western allies agonize over possible military intervention in the Balkans, the U.S.-led airdrops of food continue every night over Bosnia-Herzegovina, mostly to embattled Muslim enclaves in eastern Bosnia. Launched with much fanfare Feb. 28, the airdrops quickly became routine and have gone on without a hitch. U.S. military officials say the mission has been a success. The C-130 U.S. Air Force cargo planes take off from the Rhein-Main Base outside Frankfurt.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Friday the U.S. government is seriously considering a U.N. request to send heavy helicopters to evacuate seriously wounded civilians from a besieged Bosnian town, a step that would bring American air crews into range of Serbian artillery. The urgent request by U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata forces the Clinton Administration to confront head-on the Pentagon's reluctance to commit U.S.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While international relief officials say any effort to feed the starving in Bosnia-Herzegovina is welcome, a U.S. airdrop over the war-ravaged former Yugoslav republic so far appears to have offered more symbolism than solace. Since U.S. military cargo planes began soaring over embattled Bosnian enclaves to parachute aid to hungry and wounded civilians two miles below, Serbian rebels have grabbed more territory and have continued to block ground deliveries of food and medicine for their victims.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Clinton vowed Thursday to continue on his present course of action on Bosnia-Herzegovina undeterred by terrorism, shrugging off a threat by a Bosnian Serb leader against the United States and a grenade attack on the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade. "I don't think the American people can afford to be afraid," Clinton said.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER and LAURA SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Serbian forces overran the embattled Muslim enclave of Cerska in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina on Tuesday in a brutal, defiant act that embarrassed U.N. peace negotiations and the Clinton Administration's emergency aid airdrop in the region, according to reports reaching U.N. officials. Although not linking their action to the latest flare-up of fighting, American officials decided to end the airdrop--at least for a while--after Tuesday's night of high-altitude flights.
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton met Tuesday with U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali as the Administration prepared final plans for a limited, largely symbolic, airdrop of food and medicine to besieged villages in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina. Under plans being worked out with U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | From Associated Press
While the U.S. government and its Western allies agonize over possible military intervention in the Balkans, the U.S.-led airdrops of food continue every night over Bosnia-Herzegovina, mostly to embattled Muslim enclaves in eastern Bosnia. Launched with much fanfare Feb. 28, the airdrops quickly became routine and have gone on without a hitch. U.S. military officials say the mission has been a success. The C-130 U.S. Air Force cargo planes take off from the Rhein-Main Base outside Frankfurt.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | LAURA SILBER and ART PINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Pentagon said Monday that its first humanitarian airdrop into eastern Bosnia was a success but that the mountainous, tree-covered terrain apparently made many of the crates difficult to locate, and they had to be pinpointed by American spy satellites. Officials said that three unarmed C-130 cargo planes, flying from the U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a patchy moonlit sky, American cargo planes early today began airdrops of humanitarian aid to starving residents of eastern Bosnia, cut off for months from the outside world by Serbian forces. The drop of food and medical supplies from three U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules transports constitutes the first direct American involvement in the Yugoslav conflict. It also marks the beginning of the Clinton Administration's first major foreign policy initiative.
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