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United States Foreign Aid Cambodia

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NEWS
June 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States could not provide aid to Cambodia if the radical Khmer Rouge became involved in a government of national reconciliation, Deputy Secretary of State Clifton Wharton said. Wharton, on a one-day visit to Cambodia, said the Khmer Rouge had turned its back on the Paris peace accords, which formally ended 13 years of civil war, and had refused to give up violence.
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NEWS
July 25, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration said Saturday that the United States will not necessarily refuse to provide aid to Cambodia if the interim government now being put together in Phnom Penh ends up including the Marxist-inspired Khmer Rouge guerrillas. A senior U.S. official traveling with Secretary of State Warren Christopher said the Administration is hoping to "clarify" the U.S. position at a meeting here this weekend of the six-country Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). U.S.
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NEWS
September 10, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Unless Prince Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia severs ties with the Khmer Rouge, the United States should not send arms or humanitarian aid to non-Communist rebel factions affiliated with him, Rep. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) said here Saturday. Speaking at an international symposium on U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States could not provide aid to Cambodia if the radical Khmer Rouge became involved in a government of national reconciliation, Deputy Secretary of State Clifton Wharton said. Wharton, on a one-day visit to Cambodia, said the Khmer Rouge had turned its back on the Paris peace accords, which formally ended 13 years of civil war, and had refused to give up violence.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration admitted Tuesday that there may have been "tactical military cooperation" in Cambodia between the U.S.-backed non-Communist resistance groups and the murderous Khmer Rouge, which killed more than a million Cambodians in the late 1970s.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration said Saturday that the United States will not necessarily refuse to provide aid to Cambodia if the interim government now being put together in Phnom Penh ends up including the Marxist-inspired Khmer Rouge guerrillas. A senior U.S. official traveling with Secretary of State Warren Christopher said the Administration is hoping to "clarify" the U.S. position at a meeting here this weekend of the six-country Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration admitted Tuesday that there may have been "tactical military cooperation" in Cambodia between the U.S.-backed non-Communist resistance groups and the murderous Khmer Rouge, which killed more than a million Cambodians in the late 1970s.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Unless Prince Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia severs ties with the Khmer Rouge, the United States should not send arms or humanitarian aid to non-Communist rebel factions affiliated with him, Rep. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) said here Saturday. Speaking at an international symposium on U.S.
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