Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Aid Central America
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Aid Central America

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton told Central American leaders Friday that U.S. assistance is shifting from short-term emergency hurricane relief to a focus on long-term construction through liberalized trade, debt relief and other measures. With four Central American presidents and one vice president standing nearby, Clinton said he will visit the region in early 1999, and he announced $17 million in additional food aid, bringing the total U.S. aid package since Hurricane Mitch to $300 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 2, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judy Barcelata, whose San Dimas company sells emergency medical equipment, sees opportunity in storm-ravaged Central America. "Our [Latino] culture sometimes doesn't see how important it is to take preventive measures," said Barcelata, vice president of Fegal International, which expanded here from Mexico in January. Hurricane Mitch was a potent demonstration of the need for more of her company's products in Central America.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a sum of $400 million, Honduras could get a start on rebuilding the 88 bridges that tropical storm Mitch destroyed or damaged on its rampage through Central America. Or it could construct housing for some of its 1.4 million citizens who lost their homes. Or, Honduras could make the regular annual payment on its $4.1 billion foreign debt.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the beleaguered victims of tropical storm Mitch, more U.S. relief is supposedly on the way to Central America--but the ball and chain of American politics is slowing it down. Although a broad spectrum of Congress backs a package of disaster assistance totaling almost $1 billion--more than triple the amount Washington already has provided--the bill has become ensnarled in a thicket of side issues that could serve as a field guide to Capitol Hill's hottest topics. The budget surplus.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central America is back on the celebrity circuit, at least for the moment. Not since the region's civil wars ended early this decade have so many dignitaries planned stops at these tiny countries. They're bringing aid for victims of tropical storm Mitch, distributing used clothes and contributions for medicine and food donated by ordinary people.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III offered Monday to orchestrate an international search for financial aid to Central America's impoverished civilian democracies and their newly formed economic community.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Nicaragua can hold a free election and cope with the results, Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez said last weekend, "Central America will be a very different place." Arias, the architect of the peace talks that led to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's surprise election Sunday as president of Nicaragua, already has seen his prediction come true.
NEWS
March 4, 1987
President Reagan called on Congress to approve a $300-million Central America aid package that the lawmakers failed to pass last year due to budgetary restraints. Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams said $100 million would be earmarked for earthquake relief in El Salvador. Of the remainder, Honduras would receive $65 million, El Salvador $55 million, and Costa Rica and Guatemala $40 million each.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the beleaguered victims of tropical storm Mitch, more U.S. relief is supposedly on the way to Central America--but the ball and chain of American politics is slowing it down. Although a broad spectrum of Congress backs a package of disaster assistance totaling almost $1 billion--more than triple the amount Washington already has provided--the bill has become ensnarled in a thicket of side issues that could serve as a field guide to Capitol Hill's hottest topics. The budget surplus.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of five Central American nations, emerging from a decade of violent conflict and deepening poverty, agreed Sunday night on an ambitious plan to integrate their economies. The accord calls for setting up an Economic Community of the Central American Isthmus to coordinate every aspect of development--including trade policy, debt management, food production, environmental protection and the quest for foreign aid.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton told Central American leaders Friday that U.S. assistance is shifting from short-term emergency hurricane relief to a focus on long-term construction through liberalized trade, debt relief and other measures. With four Central American presidents and one vice president standing nearby, Clinton said he will visit the region in early 1999, and he announced $17 million in additional food aid, bringing the total U.S. aid package since Hurricane Mitch to $300 million.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a sum of $400 million, Honduras could get a start on rebuilding the 88 bridges that tropical storm Mitch destroyed or damaged on its rampage through Central America. Or it could construct housing for some of its 1.4 million citizens who lost their homes. Or, Honduras could make the regular annual payment on its $4.1 billion foreign debt.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central America is back on the celebrity circuit, at least for the moment. Not since the region's civil wars ended early this decade have so many dignitaries planned stops at these tiny countries. They're bringing aid for victims of tropical storm Mitch, distributing used clothes and contributions for medicine and food donated by ordinary people.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertisement in a U.S. magazine shows a Salvadoran woman in a bright print dress bent over an industrial sewing machine. "Rosa Martinez produces apparel for U.S. markets on her sewing machine in El Salvador," the ad promises the readers of Bobbin, a textile industry trade journal. "You can hire her for 33 cents an hour."
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III offered Monday to orchestrate an international search for financial aid to Central America's impoverished civilian democracies and their newly formed economic community.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of five Central American nations, emerging from a decade of violent conflict and deepening poverty, agreed Sunday night on an ambitious plan to integrate their economies. The accord calls for setting up an Economic Community of the Central American Isthmus to coordinate every aspect of development--including trade policy, debt management, food production, environmental protection and the quest for foreign aid.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertisement in a U.S. magazine shows a Salvadoran woman in a bright print dress bent over an industrial sewing machine. "Rosa Martinez produces apparel for U.S. markets on her sewing machine in El Salvador," the ad promises the readers of Bobbin, a textile industry trade journal. "You can hire her for 33 cents an hour."
BUSINESS
June 2, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judy Barcelata, whose San Dimas company sells emergency medical equipment, sees opportunity in storm-ravaged Central America. "Our [Latino] culture sometimes doesn't see how important it is to take preventive measures," said Barcelata, vice president of Fegal International, which expanded here from Mexico in January. Hurricane Mitch was a potent demonstration of the need for more of her company's products in Central America.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Nicaragua can hold a free election and cope with the results, Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez said last weekend, "Central America will be a very different place." Arias, the architect of the peace talks that led to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's surprise election Sunday as president of Nicaragua, already has seen his prediction come true.
NEWS
March 4, 1987
President Reagan called on Congress to approve a $300-million Central America aid package that the lawmakers failed to pass last year due to budgetary restraints. Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams said $100 million would be earmarked for earthquake relief in El Salvador. Of the remainder, Honduras would receive $65 million, El Salvador $55 million, and Costa Rica and Guatemala $40 million each.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|