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United States Foreign Aid Colombia

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NEWS
November 30, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mayor here in Colombia's major coca-growing province was killed Wednesday, authorities said, as a Marxist rebel protest against U.S.-backed drug crop eradication entered its third month. Two men on a motorcycle--a common assassination team in Colombia--killed Carlos Julio Rosas, the authorities said. Rosas was the mayor of Orito, a town in the southern province of Putumayo, which is under siege by insurgents opposed to the fumigation of coca fields.
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NEWS
November 30, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mayor here in Colombia's major coca-growing province was killed Wednesday, authorities said, as a Marxist rebel protest against U.S.-backed drug crop eradication entered its third month. Two men on a motorcycle--a common assassination team in Colombia--killed Carlos Julio Rosas, the authorities said. Rosas was the mayor of Orito, a town in the southern province of Putumayo, which is under siege by insurgents opposed to the fumigation of coca fields.
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NEWS
August 29, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
Colombian Justice Minister Monica de Greiff, shielded by extraordinarily tight security because her country's cocaine barons have threatened to kill her, conferred with Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and other American officials Monday about U.S.-Colombian cooperation to bring narcotics traffickers to trial in the United States.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
White House anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey on Monday predicted heavy fighting in an approaching U.S.-backed anti-drug offensive and warned that there would be repercussions for Colombia's neighbors. But with "vital" U.S. interests at stake, and insurgents growing stronger through deepening ties to the drug trade, McCaffrey said he saw no alternative to the $1.3-billion effort set to get underway in January. "Colombia has no option.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 |
President Clinton plans to announce a massive new aid program for Colombia totaling more than $1 billion in military and development assistance over the next two years. It would be used to combat narcotics cultivation and trafficking and bolster the Latin American country's beleaguered democracy.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | RUTH MORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Clearly bidding for a major increase in U.S. anti-narcotics aid, Colombia's top military commander said Saturday that his forces are making significant strides toward improving their human rights record while Marxist rebels and their right-wing outlaw foes share equal responsibility for the deaths of many more unarmed civilians. Armed forces commander Gen.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government has made its position clear: 1) The United States will do all it can to support Colombia's war on drugs. 2) The United States will not become involved in Colombia's other war: its long, internal conflict. The Colombian army has been fighting leftist guerrillas for three decades and is increasingly coming into confrontation with right-wing private armies. What is not clear is where one war ends and the other begins. "You really can't draw the line," one U.S. official admitted.
NEWS
December 27, 1998 | From the Washington Post
Despite the roles of Colombia's military in human rights abuses and the corruption created by the nation's role as one of the world's leading producers of cocaine, the United States is stepping up its involvement with the Colombian armed forces because it fears that they are losing a war to Marxist rebels who derive much of their income from drug trafficking.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday defended his decision to release $1.3 billion in anti-drug aid to Colombia, as administration officials sought to shift attention away from military assistance and toward efforts to build civil institutions and wean peasants from drug production.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday he will not revise his formula for a joint U.S.-Soviet military reduction in Europe even though the Soviets have rejected the idea because it would leave U.S. forces with an additional 30,000 troops. Pointing to the geographical advantage the Soviet Union would have in redeploying units to Central and Eastern Europe west of Soviet borders, Bush said that "we've got a big ocean between us and . . . Western Europe" that would delay a speedy redeployment.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton swooped into this troubled country Wednesday to showcase American determination to face down leftist rebels and drug traffickers. But he pledged that aiding Colombia will not embroil the U.S. in a military escalation echoing the Vietnam War. "I reject the idea that we must choose between supporting peace and fighting drugs. We can do both; indeed, to succeed, we must do both," Clinton said at a ceremony to tout $1.3 billion in U.S.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday defended his decision to release $1.3 billion in anti-drug aid to Colombia, as administration officials sought to shift attention away from military assistance and toward efforts to build civil institutions and wean peasants from drug production.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Senate fended off efforts Wednesday to scale back President Clinton's package of anti-narcotics assistance to Colombia, giving new life to a measure that has languished for months. Senators demonstrated strong support for the plan, which contains $934 million for Colombia, as they worked toward passage of a foreign aid bill for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. Final approval of the overall $13.4-billion foreign aid bill was expected today.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | JANET HOOK and ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's long-delayed plan to combat drug trafficking in Colombia cleared its first major hurdle Thursday as the House approved providing $1.7 billion to help the beleaguered South American country dry up a major source of cocaine and heroin. The aid was approved despite objections from many of Clinton's fellow Democrats, who fear that it marks the start of a long-term, Vietnam-like commitment to a nation whose armed forces have consistently been implicated in human rights violations.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
The House refused Wednesday to slash a planned $1.7 billion for battling drug lords in Colombia and edged toward approving a $13-billion bill that would also finance U.S. peacekeepers in Kosovo and aid victims of natural disasters at home. The House voted, 239-186, to reject an effort by Rep. David R. Obey (D-Wis.) that would have delayed, and perhaps eventually killed, $522 million of the Colombia aid. The roll call came after House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | RUTH MORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trying to pacify U.S. critics of Washington's proposed anti-narcotics aid package to Colombia, Defense Minister Luis Fernando Ramirez traveled to Los Angeles on Wednesday to argue that Marxist guerrillas are responsible for most human rights abuses in his violent nation.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 |
President Clinton on Tuesday called for deeper U.S. involvement in Colombia's war against drugs, proposing a $1.6-billion aid package to counter what officials called rapidly expanding drug production there. Clinton said in a written statement that the aid was "urgently needed" to keep illegal drugs out of the United States. Colombian President Andres Pastrana hailed the action as a "win-win day for democracy and law enforcement."
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