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NEWS
June 13, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's arrival for his first summit with President Bush, two Iowa congressmen have begun to organize an effort aimed at freeing up the Bush Administration's $600-million aid package for Russia and other former Soviet republics. Democratic Rep. Dave Nagle and Republican Rep. Jim Leach on Friday assembled organizations ranging from the ultra-liberal Council for a Livable World to the U.S.
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NEWS
April 2, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Calling for a "strategic alliance with Russian reform," President Clinton on Thursday urged Americans to support additional economic aid to the countries of the former Soviet Union, warning that "our ability to put people first at home requires that we put Russia and its neighbors first on our agenda abroad." Aid to the Russians "is not an act of charity," Clinton said, "it is an investment in our own future."
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NEWS
February 12, 1992 | from Associated Press
Lunch at the Lyublinskaya soup kitchen was clearly different on Tuesday. There was canned cream of chicken soup instead of borscht, pork chops and plenty of dental floss for the toothless crowd of pensioners. The Moscow cafeteria, which has been operating as a soup kitchen since Jan. 1, served up the first of 100,000 American meals--mostly leftover military rations--flown in on Monday as part of "Operation Provide Hope."
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said Friday that the United States will provide $412 million worth of food and medicine to the former Soviet Union this winter, almost doubling the $417 million in aid approved by the U.S. Congress earlier this month.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the international aid package that President Bush unveiled Wednesday, Russia is scheduled to receive some new international checking accounts, loan guarantees to buy grain and merchandise and deferral of interest payments on some of its foreign debts. Much of the money allocated already is awaiting the Russians' entry into the International Monetary Fund, which acts as a banker for countries with troubled economies. Only a small part of the $5 billion U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER
Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) ripped President Bush's failure to provide more foreign aid to the former Soviet Union this week as "nothing less than criminal neglect of the United States' foreign policy and national security objectives." Berman, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on international operations, said on the House floor that U. S.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
PORK BY ANY NAME: The U.S. food giveaway to the Commonwealth of Independent States ran into a problem in the Muslim nations of what was formerly Soviet Central Asia. . . . Many meals contained pork, a forbidden food for Muslims. To avoid embarrassment, advance teams told the governments they had two options: to refuse the food shipments altogether or to allow distributors to sort out the pork and give it to the needy elsewhere.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the Western democracies have yet to win the Cold War, former President Richard M. Nixon said Wednesday that the United States must lead the world in providing massive aid, perhaps $20 billion a year, to the former Soviet republics or risk confrontation with a new generation of despots.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush offered a $645-million increase in American assistance to the former Soviet republics Wednesday, but Japan said that it will not provide more help until it settles a territorial dispute with Moscow left over from World War II. Opening a 47-nation conference on aid to the former Soviet Union, Bush called on the world community to show the newly independent states that it "cares about them and supports their hard struggle to build new societies on the ruins of communism."
BUSINESS
October 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. to Make Big Corn Donation: The Agriculture Department announced that it will buy $100 million worth for donation overseas. But some farmers said the plan is too modest to overcome the price-depressing effects of a record crop. Farmers say this year's low prices could help push thousands of them off the land, despite a string of election-eve efforts by the Bush Administration to expand markets for U.S. farm products at home and abroad with credit guarantees and export subsidies.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The capitalist world offered sympathy, advice and a little more money Thursday to the beleaguered republics of the former Soviet Union, which have lost about a quarter or more of their economic output since the fall of communism. "It is important . . . for us to acknowledge the hardships which the process of economic reforms is bringing to the people of the former Soviet Union," Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. to Make Big Corn Donation: The Agriculture Department announced that it will buy $100 million worth for donation overseas. But some farmers said the plan is too modest to overcome the price-depressing effects of a record crop. Farmers say this year's low prices could help push thousands of them off the land, despite a string of election-eve efforts by the Bush Administration to expand markets for U.S. farm products at home and abroad with credit guarantees and export subsidies.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said Tuesday that he hopes to reassure officials of the former Soviet republics, as well as nations donating aid to the region, that the upcoming U.S. elections will not change Washington's commitments in the area. "I'm not predicting the election. . . .
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved a $26.4-billion foreign aid bill Thursday that includes $10 billion in loan guarantees for Israel and $417 million in aid to the countries that make up the former Soviet Union. The measure passed, 87 to 12, on a day when senators also ratified the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The foreign aid bill now goes to a joint conference committee to iron out differences between the House and Senate versions.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, overcoming weeks of partisan delays, satisfied one of President Bush's top foreign policy priorities Thursday by passing a much-debated package of economic aid for Russia and the other former Soviet states. The broad economic package, whose centerpiece is a $12-billion increase in the U.S. contribution to the International Monetary Fund, was approved by a vote of 76 to 20 just before the Senate recessed for the July 4 weekend.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's arrival for his first summit with President Bush, two Iowa congressmen have begun to organize an effort aimed at freeing up the Bush Administration's $600-million aid package for Russia and other former Soviet republics. Democratic Rep. Dave Nagle and Republican Rep. Jim Leach on Friday assembled organizations ranging from the ultra-liberal Council for a Livable World to the U.S.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | D'JAMILA SALEM
Background: Providing assistance to the republics of the former Soviet Union has become the lightning rod of debate over foreign aid programs. Proponents urge massive aid to help Russia and other members of the Commonwealth of Independent States solidify free-market economies and democratic reforms. Opponents contend that the money could be better spent at home.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and its major diplomatic partners unveiled a $24-billion program Wednesday to bolster Russia's struggling economy, stabilize its currency and provide far-reaching support for the long transition to a market system. The United States will contribute $5 billion. The program is the most comprehensive assistance package offered to Russia since the Communist Soviet Union fragmented and its republics were left to fashion independent economies on their own.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | D'JAMILA SALEM
Background: Providing assistance to the republics of the former Soviet Union has become the lightning rod of debate over foreign aid programs. Proponents urge massive aid to help Russia and other members of the Commonwealth of Independent States solidify free-market economies and democratic reforms. Opponents contend that the money could be better spent at home.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, better-known as an inside deal-maker than a magnetic public speaker, launched an unusual barnstorming tour Tuesday to whip up public support for billions of dollars in aid to the former Soviet Union. "This is not just more foreign aid," Baker told the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations as he began his campaign to pressure a reluctant Congress to approve the Bush Administration's aid proposal. "It is instead a hardheaded investment in our security. . . .
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