Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Aid Eastern Europe
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Aid Eastern Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is taking a deliberately slow--and decidedly unenthusiastic--approach toward U.S. participation in a new development bank to help the newly emerging economies of former East Bloc nations. Although Washington has agreed in principle to take part in the venture, the Administration has been reluctant to make any firm commitment on how much financial assistance the United States may eventually contribute.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 24 industrial nations responsible for aid to Eastern Europe excluded Yugoslavia from the list of eligible recipients Monday but admitted Albania and the new Baltic nations, and many of the 24 criticized the United States for not shouldering a fair share of the donations. The United States has pledged less than 8% of the roughly $32 billion committed by the 24 nations. That contrasts with 81% from Western Europe and more than 30% from Germany alone.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting under a veto threat, the Senate on Friday approved a comprehensive $54-billion farm bill that would freeze subsidy payments for basic crops and the dairy program for the next five years but give farmers greater flexibility to grow other products in response to market demand. The vote was 70 to 21.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting under a veto threat, the Senate on Friday approved a comprehensive $54-billion farm bill that would freeze subsidy payments for basic crops and the dairy program for the next five years but give farmers greater flexibility to grow other products in response to market demand. The vote was 70 to 21.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration officials Wednesday ridiculed House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) as the "Maxwell Smart" of American politics after he criticized its cautious approach towards changes sweeping Eastern Europe, and they said his proposal to offer direct economic aid to the Soviet Union is premature. Testifying before a House subcommittee, Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In the first substantive Democratic response to the upheaval in Eastern Europe, House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt on Tuesday outlined a broad program for U.S. assistance to the emerging democracies in what used to be the Soviet orbit and to the Soviet Union itself.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that President Bush's request for additional aid for Eastern Europe is not enough, Senate Democrats unveiled legislation Tuesday to give an additional $511 million to fund democratic reform movements in East Bloc countries over the next three years. The money, which the Democrats suggested could be funded by further cuts in the defense budget, would be added to a $738-million aid package approved last November for Poland and Hungary.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as a domestic budget squeeze tightens in the United States, the sudden political changes in Panama and Eastern Europe are unleashing appeals for sharply increased U.S. foreign aid--appeals that the United States may not be able to satisfy. "The democratization of Eastern Europe is welcome politically, of course, but it's a very disastrous situation from a budgetary viewpoint," said a key Administration strategist who has been keeping tabs on the problem.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | JACK NELSON and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite his efforts to lower expectations about his meeting with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, President Bush is aiming for significant understandings, if not formal agreements, that would put a positive finish on an otherwise lackluster first year of his Administration.
NEWS
July 19, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
President Bush returned home from Europe on Tuesday, still a little euphoric after a week that began with cheering crowds in Poland and ended with a letter from Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev proclaiming the Kremlin's desire to move closer to the West. "We all come away with real genuine feelings of genuine change," he told reporters aboard Air Force One. "I think the American people need to know how strongly we feel about this."
BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eastern Europe's emerging democracies face daunting problems, including the likelihood of deep recession, in shifting to a free-market economic system, but their long-term prospects are good if they can surmount these difficulties, the CIA said Wednesday. A similar report on the Soviet Union, prepared by the CIA and the Pentagon's Defense Intelligence Agency in April, said the Soviet economy was so unstable that it could collapse in the face of any serious shock.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the United States "must export our experience," President Bush announced a series of low-cost measures Saturday intended to coordinate voluntary support for the democratic movements in Eastern Europe. He also announced a modest expansion of loans to Poland by the U.S. Export-Import Bank. And in an effort to promote "free and fair elections" in Eastern Europe, Bush said that he would send presidential delegations to observe elections in Romania and Bulgaria.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a direct challenge to President Bush, key Senate Democrats are drafting a three-year, $2-billion aid package for Eastern Europe that is far more than the Administration has requested for nations emerging from Soviet domination. A proposal prepared by Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee would provide the lion's share of the additional funds--$1.2 billion--for a European Bank for Reconstruction and Development now being formed by Western European countries.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Thursday called again on the Soviet Union to allow "peaceful evolution" in Lithuania and said he does not believe recent Soviet moves serve that end. "It is very important that force not be used," Bush said. Asked if Soviet decisions to restrict access to Lithuania and increase the power of the KGB's internal security police fit his definition of "peaceful evolution," Bush replied: "No, I wouldn't put that down as peaceful evolution."
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration officials Wednesday ridiculed House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) as the "Maxwell Smart" of American politics after he criticized its cautious approach towards changes sweeping Eastern Europe, and they said his proposal to offer direct economic aid to the Soviet Union is premature. Testifying before a House subcommittee, Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In the first substantive Democratic response to the upheaval in Eastern Europe, House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt on Tuesday outlined a broad program for U.S. assistance to the emerging democracies in what used to be the Soviet orbit and to the Soviet Union itself.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To find funds for the emerging democracies of Nicaragua, Panama and the former Communist countries of Eastern Europe, the Bush Administration would support cuts in foreign aid to other nations, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Thursday. Baker said he would prefer to "increase the pie" by boosting the overall $15-billion foreign aid program. But he acknowledged that he does not know how that could be done short of raising taxes--an action that the Administration has long rejected.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You could say that we've won," a senior U.S. official remarked. "Our policy of 'differentiation' in Eastern Europe--of treating each nation differently depending on how they behaved--has succeeded. Or at least, it's been (overtaken by events). In either case, now we need a new construct, a new concept that embraces the region as a whole." Indeed, the remarkable changes that brought down the six regimes of the East Bloc in 1989 have also created a compelling need for a new U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To find funds for the emerging democracies of Nicaragua, Panama and the former Communist countries of Eastern Europe, the Bush Administration would support cuts in foreign aid to other nations, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Thursday. Baker said he would prefer to "increase the pie" by boosting the overall $15-billion foreign aid program. But he acknowledged that he does not know how that could be done short of raising taxes--an action that the Administration has long rejected.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best way for the United States to help Eastern Europe is to help the Soviet Union on its "immensely complicated road to democracy," Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel told a joint session of Congress on Wednesday. Aid to the Soviet Union may seem "paradoxical" in the Western world, where for years it "was a country that rightfully gave people nightmares," Havel told a warmly applauding audience composed of members of Congress, the Cabinet and diplomats.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|