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United States Foreign Aid Estonia

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NEWS
September 17, 1996 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Do this to almost any other country and you'd expect a burst of nationalist indignation. Maybe an insult about Yankee imperialism or a few choice words for the American ambassador behind closed doors. But not here. When the United States cut off aid Monday for the first time to a nation of the former Soviet bloc, Estonia threw a party.
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NEWS
September 17, 1996 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Do this to almost any other country and you'd expect a burst of nationalist indignation. Maybe an insult about Yankee imperialism or a few choice words for the American ambassador behind closed doors. But not here. When the United States cut off aid Monday for the first time to a nation of the former Soviet bloc, Estonia threw a party.
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NEWS
February 7, 1992 | Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle on Thursday pledged American support for the three Baltic states and announced $18 million in additional U.S. aid to them. Quayle, arriving from Finland, expressed America's support for Estonia which, with Latvia and Lithuania, regained independence from the Soviet Union in September.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle on Thursday pledged American support for the three Baltic states and announced $18 million in additional U.S. aid to them. Quayle, arriving from Finland, expressed America's support for Estonia which, with Latvia and Lithuania, regained independence from the Soviet Union in September.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration announced Wednesday that it will begin sending relief supplies directly to the Baltics and the Ukraine, circumventing the Soviet central government in an apparent response to Moscow's violent crackdown on nationalist dissent. White House officials stressed that the assistance was not intended to undercut the efforts of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to reach a peaceful solution to the crisis posed by the secessionist movements.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Estonia on Wednesday formally restored the diplomatic relations between the two countries that had been interrupted since 1940, when the Soviet army, occupying this tiny Baltic country, forced the American diplomats here to leave. "This is not a new country," Curtis Kamman, deputy assistant secretary of state, said after signing a document resuming relations.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Estonia on Wednesday formally restored the diplomatic relations between the two countries that had been interrupted since 1940, when the Soviet army, occupying this tiny Baltic country, forced the American diplomats here to leave. "This is not a new country," Curtis Kamman, deputy assistant secretary of state, said after signing a document resuming relations.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration announced Wednesday that it will begin sending relief supplies directly to the Baltics and the Ukraine, circumventing the Soviet central government in an apparent response to Moscow's violent crackdown on nationalist dissent. White House officials stressed that the assistance was not intended to undercut the efforts of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to reach a peaceful solution to the crisis posed by the secessionist movements.
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