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United States Foreign Aid Ethiopia

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NEWS
April 14, 1988
Ethiopia's decision to shut down an international relief effort has raised the specter of a "human catastrophe" with more than 2 million people facing starvation, the State Department said. Department spokesman Charles Redman accused Ethiopia of sacrificing the interests of millions of its citizens in pursuit of military objects in Eritrea and Tigre provinces, where anti-government rebellions have been under way for years.
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NEWS
May 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, meeting for the third time in just over a month, restored some momentum to superpower arms control talks Friday, although they failed to resolve remaining disputes over cruise missiles and other topics, U.S. officials said. A senior U.S. official used the terms "serious" and "constructive" to describe the nuclear arms control segment of the three-hour meeting.
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NEWS
May 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, meeting for the third time in just over a month, restored some momentum to superpower arms control talks Friday, although they failed to resolve remaining disputes over cruise missiles and other topics, U.S. officials said. A senior U.S. official used the terms "serious" and "constructive" to describe the nuclear arms control segment of the three-hour meeting.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
An Ethiopian government aircraft carrying Rep. Mickey Leland (D-Tex.), chairman of the House Select Committee on Hunger, and eight other Americans disappeared Monday on a flight from Addis Ababa to a refugee camp near the Sudan border, the State Department announced. Department spokeswoman Greta Morris said the plane failed to arrive at Fugnido Refugee Camp, near the town of Gambela about 300 miles west of Addis Ababa, the capital.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government, which provided 41% of the international food aid in Ethiopia's last famine but was only belatedly recognized here for its gift, is also the largest contributor of relief assistance in the current drought. This time, however, it is getting public thanks from the Ethiopian government. The U.S. government earlier pledged 115,000 tons of food, valued at about $40 million. On Thursday, the U.S.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In response to an urgent request from the government of Ethiopia, the United States agreed Friday to send 115,000 tons of emergency food aid to help stave off a famine that officials say threatens to be as severe as that which devastated the nation two years ago. The shipment, at a cost of $37.6 million, will supply one-eighth of the total food that Ethiopian and U.S. officials agree will be necessary next year to feed those threatened by a widespread drought.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
An Ethiopian government aircraft carrying Rep. Mickey Leland (D-Tex.), chairman of the House Select Committee on Hunger, and eight other Americans disappeared Monday on a flight from Addis Ababa to a refugee camp near the Sudan border, the State Department announced. Department spokeswoman Greta Morris said the plane failed to arrive at Fugnido Refugee Camp, near the town of Gambela about 300 miles west of Addis Ababa, the capital.
NEWS
April 14, 1988
Ethiopia's decision to shut down an international relief effort has raised the specter of a "human catastrophe" with more than 2 million people facing starvation, the State Department said. Department spokesman Charles Redman accused Ethiopia of sacrificing the interests of millions of its citizens in pursuit of military objects in Eritrea and Tigre provinces, where anti-government rebellions have been under way for years.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government, which provided 41% of the international food aid in Ethiopia's last famine but was only belatedly recognized here for its gift, is also the largest contributor of relief assistance in the current drought. This time, however, it is getting public thanks from the Ethiopian government. The U.S. government earlier pledged 115,000 tons of food, valued at about $40 million. On Thursday, the U.S.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In response to an urgent request from the government of Ethiopia, the United States agreed Friday to send 115,000 tons of emergency food aid to help stave off a famine that officials say threatens to be as severe as that which devastated the nation two years ago. The shipment, at a cost of $37.6 million, will supply one-eighth of the total food that Ethiopian and U.S. officials agree will be necessary next year to feed those threatened by a widespread drought.
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