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United States Foreign Aid Europe

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NEWS
December 23, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as a domestic budget squeeze tightens in the United States, the sudden political changes in Panama and Eastern Europe are unleashing appeals for sharply increased U.S. foreign aid--appeals that the United States may not be able to satisfy. "The democratization of Eastern Europe is welcome politically, of course, but it's a very disastrous situation from a budgetary viewpoint," said a key Administration strategist who has been keeping tabs on the problem.
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NEWS
June 14, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With presidents and prime ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization now virtually certain to select three new members early next month, the biggest potential obstacle to expansion of the alliance may be sticker shock on Capitol Hill and in 15 other legislative chambers. Estimates of the cost of integrating Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic into NATO over the next dozen or so years vary alarmingly from less than $27 billion to more than $125 billion. The U.S.
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NEWS
June 14, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With presidents and prime ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization now virtually certain to select three new members early next month, the biggest potential obstacle to expansion of the alliance may be sticker shock on Capitol Hill and in 15 other legislative chambers. Estimates of the cost of integrating Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic into NATO over the next dozen or so years vary alarmingly from less than $27 billion to more than $125 billion. The U.S.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a symbol of the United States' long-term commitment to Europe, President Clinton on Wednesday visited this booming Dutch port that was bombed to rubble in World War II, and residents greeted him with a "Thank you, America" rally in honor of the U.S. aid that saved their city.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the start of his current European swing, President Clinton has tried to convey one overriding message: The historical parallel for his controversial initiative to redraw the security map of Europe is the Marshall Plan. Tactically, the comparison makes political sense. The late Secretary of State George C. Marshall's plan to give an exhausted Europe billions of dollars to rebuild from the ashes of World War II was wildly successful.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a symbol of the United States' long-term commitment to Europe, President Clinton on Wednesday visited this booming Dutch port that was bombed to rubble in World War II, and residents greeted him with a "Thank you, America" rally in honor of the U.S. aid that saved their city.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
It was, says former Democratic Rep. Henry S. Reuss of Wisconsin, "the finest hour in the golden age of American foreign policy." To Richard M. Bissell Jr., a former deputy CIA director, it deserves "major . . . responsibility for the relative prosperity of modern Europe and the stability . . . of the Atlantic Alliance."
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six weeks after President Bush sent Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady on separate whirlwind missions to Europe, Asia and the Arab world to ask America's allies for financial help in the Persian Gulf crisis, the Japanese are sending Mitsubishi off-road vehicles and prefabricated housing units. The South Koreans are sending gas masks. And the newly united Germans are sending chemical-detection trucks.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the start of his current European swing, President Clinton has tried to convey one overriding message: The historical parallel for his controversial initiative to redraw the security map of Europe is the Marshall Plan. Tactically, the comparison makes political sense. The late Secretary of State George C. Marshall's plan to give an exhausted Europe billions of dollars to rebuild from the ashes of World War II was wildly successful.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six weeks after President Bush sent Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady on separate whirlwind missions to Europe, Asia and the Arab world to ask America's allies for financial help in the Persian Gulf crisis, the Japanese are sending Mitsubishi off-road vehicles and prefabricated housing units. The South Koreans are sending gas masks. And the newly united Germans are sending chemical-detection trucks.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as a domestic budget squeeze tightens in the United States, the sudden political changes in Panama and Eastern Europe are unleashing appeals for sharply increased U.S. foreign aid--appeals that the United States may not be able to satisfy. "The democratization of Eastern Europe is welcome politically, of course, but it's a very disastrous situation from a budgetary viewpoint," said a key Administration strategist who has been keeping tabs on the problem.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
It was, says former Democratic Rep. Henry S. Reuss of Wisconsin, "the finest hour in the golden age of American foreign policy." To Richard M. Bissell Jr., a former deputy CIA director, it deserves "major . . . responsibility for the relative prosperity of modern Europe and the stability . . . of the Atlantic Alliance."
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