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United States Foreign Aid Germany

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February 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Wednesday that the United States and its allies might help rebuild postwar Iraq, but when pressed by members of Congress, he said reparations might be exacted if Iraq fights to the finish in a bloody ground war. "The time of reconstruction and recovery should not be the occasion for vengeful actions against a nation forced to war by a dictator's ambition," Baker told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | R euters
Germany paid its final installment of $1.68 billion in Gulf War aid to the United States on Thursday, fulfilling its pledge of $5.5 billion for Washington. This put the total of German aid for the Gulf allies at just over $10.5 billion, mainly as cash contributions. The total included $250 million extra that Bonn was forced to pay because of the dollar's rise against the mark since Germany made its pledge in late January.
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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war in the Persian Gulf is rapidly drawing to a close. American and coalition troops are liberating Kuwait and trouncing the Iraqi Republican Guard. Now comes the hard part: Getting U.S. allies to help pay for the short but expensive conflict. With the war all but won after just a few days of ground fighting, anger and frustration are rapidly mounting in Congress over the failure of many of the allies to ante up the cash they pledged.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The German government announced Tuesday that it will pay the full amount of its pledged assistance for the Persian Gulf crisis, increasing the chances that the United States will either break even or make a small profit on the war. With overdue allied pledges finally rolling into the Pentagon's coffers, congressional budget experts said they believe that the government may not need to spend the $15 billion authorized by Congress to help pay for the war. The $53.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks of war in the Persian Gulf has claimed no greater political casualty than Germany. Only two months ago, a newly united, sovereign Germany looked secure as the Bush Administration's closest NATO ally. Rich, strong and confident, it seemed the natural leader of the "new" Europe. Newly reelected Chancellor Helmut Kohl looked like a fast-emerging world statesman and Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher a key architect of a much-heralded new European order.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | R euters
Germany paid its final installment of $1.68 billion in Gulf War aid to the United States on Thursday, fulfilling its pledge of $5.5 billion for Washington. This put the total of German aid for the Gulf allies at just over $10.5 billion, mainly as cash contributions. The total included $250 million extra that Bonn was forced to pay because of the dollar's rise against the mark since Germany made its pledge in late January.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The German government announced Tuesday that it will pay the full amount of its pledged assistance for the Persian Gulf crisis, increasing the chances that the United States will either break even or make a small profit on the war. With overdue allied pledges finally rolling into the Pentagon's coffers, congressional budget experts said they believe that the government may not need to spend the $15 billion authorized by Congress to help pay for the war. The $53.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking a longstanding official policy against shipping weapons to areas of tension, the German government Wednesday announced a $700-million military support package for Israel that includes Patriot missiles and two submarines. Chemical weapons detection vehicles and extensive medical supplies are also included in the agreement, according to the government announcement.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war in the Persian Gulf is rapidly drawing to a close. American and coalition troops are liberating Kuwait and trouncing the Iraqi Republican Guard. Now comes the hard part: Getting U.S. allies to help pay for the short but expensive conflict. With the war all but won after just a few days of ground fighting, anger and frustration are rapidly mounting in Congress over the failure of many of the allies to ante up the cash they pledged.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Wednesday that the United States and its allies might help rebuild postwar Iraq, but when pressed by members of Congress, he said reparations might be exacted if Iraq fights to the finish in a bloody ground war. "The time of reconstruction and recovery should not be the occasion for vengeful actions against a nation forced to war by a dictator's ambition," Baker told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks of war in the Persian Gulf has claimed no greater political casualty than Germany. Only two months ago, a newly united, sovereign Germany looked secure as the Bush Administration's closest NATO ally. Rich, strong and confident, it seemed the natural leader of the "new" Europe. Newly reelected Chancellor Helmut Kohl looked like a fast-emerging world statesman and Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher a key architect of a much-heralded new European order.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking a longstanding official policy against shipping weapons to areas of tension, the German government Wednesday announced a $700-million military support package for Israel that includes Patriot missiles and two submarines. Chemical weapons detection vehicles and extensive medical supplies are also included in the agreement, according to the government announcement.
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