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United States Foreign Aid Haiti

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October 2, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Haiti plunged haplessly on in terror and bloodshed Tuesday as ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide pleaded from a hasty exile for international help in restoring his presidency and his country's shattered democracy. Aristide was seized by army coup-makers who called him an "apprentice dictator" and forced to fly to Caracas, Venezuela, where he accused his captors of "spreading death like flies" and plotting further massacres.
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NEWS
September 2, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration will warn Haiti's government next week that it risks losing tens of millions of dollars in U.S. aid unless it voids the results of widely condemned elections, a State Department official said Friday. The balloting in May and July gave the party of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide sweeping victories in both houses of Haiti's reconstituted Parliament. But U.S.
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NEWS
October 1, 1998 | From Reuters
The United States on Wednesday announced aid totaling $47 million to Haiti and the Dominican Republic to help them recover from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Georges last week. Brian Atwood, director of the U.S. Agency for International Development, told reporters after meeting President Leonel Fernandez that $35 million would go to the Dominican Republic and the rest to Haiti, its neighbor on the island of Hispaniola.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than five years and over $2 billion after President Clinton ordered 20,000 U.S. troops to occupy this Caribbean nation--first to "Restore" and then to "Uphold Democracy," as the U.S. operations were named--chaos and violent death remain facts of life in Haiti. Disturbing signs of disintegration abound.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States will send about 600 military construction and civil affairs specialists to Haiti beginning this week as part of a U.N. plan to restore democracy, Clinton Administration officials said. The first U.S. Navy vessel with about 250 linguists, medical specialists and military trainers will leave Thursday from Norfolk, Va., en route to the troubled nation, a Pentagon official said, adding that the program will be conducted with permission.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing a swift tour of four Latin countries, Vice President Dan Quayle arrived in impoverished Haiti on Thursday with a plea and a blunt warning that unless its military allows free elections in November, it faces more cuts in foreign aid.
NEWS
January 1, 1988
France joined the United States in suspending aid to Haiti to pressure the military-run junta into running honest elections. "The situation is too confused to continue our cooperation," French Ambassador Michel de la Fourniere said in an interview with Radio Metropole. He said France spent about $35 million in 1987 and "we would have spent twice that amount in 1988." Last month, the United States moved to suspend $75.5 million in annual aid.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | United Press International
In an apparent bid to improve its human rights image, the military has announced it is closing Ft. Dimanche, a notorious prison linked for decades with political killings and torture. An armed forces statement last Thursday gave no reason for the decision to close the mustard-yellow prison, which also serves as a explosives storehouse, and to transfer the military detachment based there. But the decision was seen by some analysts as an effort by the new military government of Lt. Gen.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A general strike in Haiti called Monday to protest election violence eight days ago only partially shut down the island nation's capital city, according to reports from Port-au-Prince. Some shops and factories stayed open and many workers trudged to their jobs despite the reduced availability of mass transportation. Confusion seemed to be one reason that the strike was less than fully effective.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
The military president of Haiti, Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril, warns that his country is verging on a "social explosion" that could shock the hemisphere unless the United States and other nations urgently provide money to help stabilize his tottering government. In an interview, the general, who two months ago survived a coup and an army mutiny, echoed a chorus of despairing voices among politicians, diplomats and business leaders--here and in the United States--who say that the economy and living conditions in the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere have plumbed dangerous new depths.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | From Reuters
The United States on Wednesday announced aid totaling $47 million to Haiti and the Dominican Republic to help them recover from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Georges last week. Brian Atwood, director of the U.S. Agency for International Development, told reporters after meeting President Leonel Fernandez that $35 million would go to the Dominican Republic and the rest to Haiti, its neighbor on the island of Hispaniola.
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Haitian President Rene Garcia Preval, visiting Washington on Thursday for his first official meeting with President Clinton, acknowledged a spate of police and political violence in his impoverished Caribbean country but blamed the problems on matters beyond his control. Although he came to Washington for economic aid, Preval was dogged by questions about violence in his nation.
NEWS
October 19, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government intends to pay the regular salaries of members of Haiti's widely reviled army and police force for doing exactly nothing, on the theory that nothing would be far better than a likely alternative: waging guerrilla warfare against the restored government of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. J.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States plans to pay millions of dollars to Haitian black marketeers violating U.S.-designed sanctions so it can replace more than half a million gallons of petroleum stocks confiscated by the military regime from humanitarian groups, U.S. and private aid officials said Tuesday. Speaking of the humanitarian aid effort, which feeds almost 1 million Haitians and will run out of fuel within weeks, U.S.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States will send about 600 military construction and civil affairs specialists to Haiti beginning this week as part of a U.N. plan to restore democracy, Clinton Administration officials said. The first U.S. Navy vessel with about 250 linguists, medical specialists and military trainers will leave Thursday from Norfolk, Va., en route to the troubled nation, a Pentagon official said, adding that the program will be conducted with permission.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Embassy threatened Thursday to freeze the U.S.-held assets of Haitian business and political leaders who backed the coup that deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The get-tough warning was delivered by U.S. Ambassador Alvin P. Adams Jr. as part of a hemisphere-wide embargo aimed at restoring Aristide to power. One Haitian economist said that the nation, one of the world's poorest, has enough official and private reserves to buy oil only for another six weeks.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
From behind the barred steel gate of what was to have been the vote-counting center of Haiti's bloodily aborted presidential election, an aged janitor, now the sole occupant of the electoral headquarters, nervously cried " Ferme , ferme " (closed) Monday.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration announced Sunday night that it is freezing all U.S. military aid and some economic aid to Haiti and that it is withdrawing all American military personnel from the Caribbean nation because of the military-led regime's cancellation of national elections. "All non-humanitarian economic aid programs to Haiti are being suspended and only humanitarian assistance will continue," a State Department spokesman said.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Haiti plunged haplessly on in terror and bloodshed Tuesday as ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide pleaded from a hasty exile for international help in restoring his presidency and his country's shattered democracy. Aristide was seized by army coup-makers who called him an "apprentice dictator" and forced to fly to Caracas, Venezuela, where he accused his captors of "spreading death like flies" and plotting further massacres.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unofficial returns Monday swept the populist priest Father Jean-Bertrand Aristide to a landslide victory in Haiti's presidential election, bringing an immediate pledge of support from the United States. "We congratulated him on his victory and told him the U.S. fully supports the democratic process in Haiti," said Assistant Secretary of State Bernard Aronson, representing President Bush's official observer delegation to the remarkably peaceful Sunday election.
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