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United States Foreign Aid Hungary

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July 14, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
For those with any memory of the bad old days in Eastern Europe, President Bush's journey through Poland and Hungary this week was nothing short of astonishing--from the Warsaw lunch at which Communists and once-jailed opposition leaders joined in toasting the United States, to the Hungarian military band that saluted Bush with a spirited rendition of "The Stars and Stripes Forever." "(The) change is absolutely amazing," Bush marveled aboard Air Force One as he left Eastern Europe on Thursday.
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NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall doesn't believe in sugar-coating the truth when describing the woeful state of the nation he governs. In a three-hour interview Monday, Antall ticked off every depressing detail of the Hungarian economy and likened his leadership task to that of Moses. Inflation and unemployment are spiraling upward while 90% of industry is still owned by the state, he pointed out.
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NEWS
July 16, 1989 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Bush and the other leaders at the annual summit meeting of seven major industrial democracies agreed Saturday to take concerted action in support of economic reforms that have been launched in Poland and Hungary. But apart from promising to funnel surplus food to Poland through the European Community, the summit leaders did not pledge any specific sum of financial aid to the two East European countries.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers of 24 of the world's richest nations approved an economic aid package for Poland and Hungary on Wednesday, including just over $1 billion in grants and loans that will permit Poland to stabilize its economy and make its now largely worthless currency convertible on international foreign exchange markets.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
In a striking example of how communism is crumbling in Eastern Europe, President Bush went before an enthusiastic audience at Karl Marx University of Economics here Wednesday and outlined a seven-point program to aid Hungary in its efforts to develop free enterprise and a more open political system.
NEWS
July 8, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
When President Bush visits Poland and Hungary next week, U.S. officials expect him to step into a warm and welcoming flood of pro-American sentiment. Despite 40 years of Communist rule, Poles and Hungarians long have yearned to be part of the West, and they have traditionally greeted U.S. officials with adulation. But when Bush begins to speak, the cheers may quickly fade.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted overwhelmingly Thursday to provide $838 million--or nearly twice what President Bush requested--for economic aid to Poland and Hungary over the next four years. The measure, which passed 345 to 47, reflects a strong consensus in Congress that the current movements toward democratization in Poland and Hungary will fail unless the economies receive substantial assistance from the West. The Senate has not yet acted on a measure providing assistance to Poland.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Hungarian Communist Party expects to win no more than one-third of the seats in next year's parliamentary election, virtually assuring non-Communist opposition groups control of the government in a second East European nation, the Speaker of the present Communist-dominated Parliament said Wednesday.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress, rushing to adjourn for the year, will hold an extraordinary Sunday session today in an effort to complete work on a budget compromise and repeal of Medicare's controversial catastrophic care program. But lawmakers may be thwarted in their plans to leave town this week because dissident senators, including Republican Minority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, are threatening a filibuster to save remnants of the catastrophic program.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | Times Wire Services
President Bush signed into law a $14.6-billion foreign aid bill Tuesday night that includes the first cash in a promised three-year aid program for Poland and Hungary. The measure includes $533 million in new aid for Poland and Hungary, aid that has become politically popular because of the wave of economic and political reform sweeping Eastern Europe.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | Times Wire Services
President Bush signed into law a $14.6-billion foreign aid bill Tuesday night that includes the first cash in a promised three-year aid program for Poland and Hungary. The measure includes $533 million in new aid for Poland and Hungary, aid that has become politically popular because of the wave of economic and political reform sweeping Eastern Europe.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Sunday vetoed a $14.6-billion foreign aid bill that included emergency economic aid for Poland and Hungary because the legislation provides $15 million for a United Nations family planning agency. The President contends that the agency finances compulsory abortions in China. The President's action marked the third time that he has vetoed a major bill containing funding for abortions.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress, rushing to adjourn for the year, will hold an extraordinary Sunday session today in an effort to complete work on a budget compromise and repeal of Medicare's controversial catastrophic care program. But lawmakers may be thwarted in their plans to leave town this week because dissident senators, including Republican Minority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, are threatening a filibuster to save remnants of the catastrophic program.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poland's Lech Walesa on Tuesday finally got to take up the invitation he received eight years ago to address the American labor movement, and--judging by his tear-streaked smile--how sweet it was. The emotional moment--shared by an overflow crowd of 1,100 AFL-CIO delegates who interrupted with applause about 29 times--would have strained a seasoned diplomat, let alone the spiritual father of Eastern Europe's democratic revolution.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
House and Senate negotiators late Monday approved $533 million in aid to Poland and Hungary to support economic and political reforms in the coming year. Included is $200 million as the U.S. contribution to a $1-billion international fund to stabilize Poland's economy as well as money to set up private sector development programs of $45 million in Poland and $5 million in Hungary.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted overwhelmingly Thursday to provide $838 million--or nearly twice what President Bush requested--for economic aid to Poland and Hungary over the next four years. The measure, which passed 345 to 47, reflects a strong consensus in Congress that the current movements toward democratization in Poland and Hungary will fail unless the economies receive substantial assistance from the West. The Senate has not yet acted on a measure providing assistance to Poland.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers of 24 of the world's richest nations approved an economic aid package for Poland and Hungary on Wednesday, including just over $1 billion in grants and loans that will permit Poland to stabilize its economy and make its now largely worthless currency convertible on international foreign exchange markets.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall doesn't believe in sugar-coating the truth when describing the woeful state of the nation he governs. In a three-hour interview Monday, Antall ticked off every depressing detail of the Hungarian economy and likened his leadership task to that of Moses. Inflation and unemployment are spiraling upward while 90% of industry is still owned by the state, he pointed out.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Hungarian Communist Party expects to win no more than one-third of the seats in next year's parliamentary election, virtually assuring non-Communist opposition groups control of the government in a second East European nation, the Speaker of the present Communist-dominated Parliament said Wednesday.
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