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United States Foreign Aid Israel

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NEWS
April 4, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House gave overwhelming, bipartisan approval Tuesday to $720 million in economic aid for Nicaragua and Panama, meeting President Bush's request for speedy action. But Senate Democratic leaders continued on a partisan course likely to result in funding delays.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of people lined the streets near the Federal Building on Saturday to protest U.S. aid to Israel and to garner support for Palestinian liberation. At 2 p.m, the crowd chanted, "Free Palestine," and waved signs calling for an end to the violence that some Palestinians in the United States said they doubt will end. Some said the recent surge in violence forced them to join the protest.
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NEWS
September 13, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush angrily vowed Thursday to veto any quick congressional attempts to provide Israel with $10 billion in loan guarantees as he stiffened his stand in what has become the sharpest confrontation between Washington and Jerusalem in a decade.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a complex, U.S.-mediated accord to keep the Mideast peace process moving, Israel and the Palestinians agreed in January that Shuhada Street, a central artery of this city, shut since 1994, would be reopened. The United States sweetened the deal, offering to finance and supervise a $1.2-million project to rebuild the closed section. Both sides agreed. But Hebron's militant Jewish settlers did not.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration turned up the heat on Israel on Tuesday after the two governments failed to agree on terms for $10 billion in U.S. loan guarantees, with a senior official charging that the government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir is endangering Secretary of State James A. Baker III's drive for Arab-Israeli peace talks.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
Israeli Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai said Tuesday that if the United States goes ahead with proposals to forgive Egypt's multibillion-dollar debt, Israel will demand that most of its debt to the Americans also be erased. Egypt owes the United States about $7 billion from previous arms sales, and Israel owes $4.6 billion. The two are the largest recipients of U.S. foreign aid. Each year, Israel receives $3 billion and Egypt gets $2.3 billion.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a complex, U.S.-mediated accord to keep the Mideast peace process moving, Israel and the Palestinians agreed in January that Shuhada Street, a central artery of this city, shut since 1994, would be reopened. The United States sweetened the deal, offering to finance and supervise a $1.2-million project to rebuild the closed section. Both sides agreed. But Hebron's militant Jewish settlers did not.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin departed Israel on Thursday for a fence-mending visit to the United States and left behind right-wing opponents seething over his policy to curtail building in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. Rabin, in power less than a month, hopes to align Israeli and American policy toward Middle East peace talks.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With each man needing a political pat on the back from the other, President Bush and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin meet today at Bush's seaside home to restore warmth to U.S.-Israel relations after a long chill during the tenure of Rabin's predecessor, Yitzhak Shamir. One senior Administration official acknowledged Sunday that Rabin "is very, very tough" as a negotiator but added that he is free of Shamir's ideological rigidity, which "made it very difficult for us to communicate."
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Israeli Ambassador Zalman Shoval failed on Friday to resolve an emotional dispute over settlements in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. The dispute is blocking American action on Israel's request for $10 billion in loan guarantees. Shoval said Israel's need for the money--to help accommodate an influx of Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union--is more crucial than ever.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Thursday pledged $100 million to help Israel combat terrorism and initiated an unprecedented intelligence-sharing arrangement. The CIA and the Pentagon will begin work immediately on a program of technical and human intelligence-gathering that will make U.S. intelligence links with Israel deeper than those with any other nation, officials said.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration announced Monday that it has offered to sell Israel 20 top-of-the-line F-15E warplanes, but visiting Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin said he is uncertain whether his government can afford the $1.8-billion price tag. Rabin and Defense Secretary Les Aspin discussed the proposed sale during a three-hour meeting at the Pentagon. The prime minister, who conferred with President Clinton on Friday, is scheduled to leave today for Canada to continue his North American trip.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House rejected attempts Thursday to cut President Clinton's aid package for Russia and the other former Soviet republics, voting overwhelmingly to approve a $13-billion foreign aid bill. The appropriations bill, which sets foreign aid levels for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, contains $1.4 billion less than Clinton requested and represents another in a series of cuts that U.S. foreign assistance has undergone over the last several years.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Other countries receiving U.S. aid will face across-the-board cuts when Congress appropriates additional long-term assistance for Russia, House Democratic Leader Richard A. Gephardt declared Monday after returning from a congressional fact-finding trip to that nation. Although President Clinton has assured Israel and Egypt, the largest recipients of U.S. aid, that they would face no reductions, Gephardt said: "Everybody has to be willing to be flexible for the good of the whole."
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An influential senator, reflecting growing congressional alarm over faltering democratic reforms in the former Soviet Union, called Thursday for a bold new aid program to help Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and suggested cutting aid to Israel and Egypt to help pay for it. Warning that "time is running out" for Yeltsin, Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved a $26.4-billion foreign aid bill Thursday that includes $10 billion in loan guarantees for Israel and $417 million in aid to the countries that make up the former Soviet Union. The measure passed, 87 to 12, on a day when senators also ratified the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The foreign aid bill now goes to a joint conference committee to iron out differences between the House and Senate versions.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, preparing to resume negotiations over terms for $10 billion in housing loan guarantees for Israel, said Wednesday that he is determined to prevent the government in Jerusalem from using the money to defy U.S. opposition to Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bush Administration revised an agreement to provide Israel with up to $10 billion in loan guarantees to ensure that there will be no cost to American taxpayers, Rep. David R. Obey (D-Wis.), chairman of the House foreign aid subcommittee, said. Under the original plan, Israel's contribution to the costs of the guarantees would have been limited to 3.5% of the face value of the loans.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush sealed his new and friendly relationship with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin on Tuesday by approving Israel's request for $10 billion in loan guarantees on terms much easier than those offered to Rabin's predecessor, Yitzhak Shamir. With Rabin at his side in a yard near his seaside vacation home, Bush said the United States "understands" Rabin's refusal to order a total freeze on Jewish settlement activity in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, even though U.S.
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