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United States Foreign Aid Jordan

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NEWS
September 29, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A split between the United States and its European allies is stalling plans to aid Jordan, one of the countries suffering most from the effects of U.N. Security Council sanctions against Iraq. The split became public Friday as Italian Foreign Minister Gianni De Michelis, current chairman of the European Community, briefed reporters on the Europeans' increasingly independent foreign policy.
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NEWS
May 15, 1999 | Associated Press
President Clinton is urging Japan, Germany, France and other creditor nations to cancel or defer Jordan's debts to help its new young king cope with a faltering economy. King Abdullah II arrived Friday for a weeklong official visit that will include a meeting with Clinton at the White House on Tuesday and talks with Cabinet officials and members of Congress.
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NEWS
August 3, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III pressed the Palestinians on Friday to come to terms with Israel's demand for limits on who can represent them at a Middle East peace conference, and he later enlisted Jordan's King Hussein to encourage the Palestinians to compromise.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing tension in the Middle East, Jordan's King Hussein is to meet President Clinton and other top U.S. officials today as part of desperate efforts to prevent the region's peace process from further unraveling. Hussein has maintained warmer relations with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu than any other Arab leader.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | From Reuters
Crown Prince Hassan of Jordan will discuss economic aid during a visit to the United States that begins today, a government official here said. The official said that the prince, the brother of King Hussein, plans to meet with President Bush, Secretary of State James A. Baker III and officials of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
House and Senate negotiators shook hands on a multi-billion dollar spending bill after easing a proposal to slash aid to Jordan. The lawmakers softened the aid cut after the proposal prompted veto threats from White House budget chief Richard Darman. Legislators granted President Bush the power to restore the $57.2 million cut by declaring that King Hussein is working toward peace in the Middle East.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave final approval Friday to a bill authorizing $42.6 billion in U.S. and allied payments toward the cost of the Persian Gulf War, including a $655-million package of benefits for Desert Storm troops and veterans. Before departing on a two-week Easter recess, lawmakers also passed a related $4.8-billion "dire emergency" money bill that contains $650 million for Israel and $200 million for Turkey to defray war-related costs. Both measures were sent to President Bush for his signature.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing tension in the Middle East, Jordan's King Hussein is to meet President Clinton and other top U.S. officials today as part of desperate efforts to prevent the region's peace process from further unraveling. Hussein has maintained warmer relations with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu than any other Arab leader.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
QUESTION: Is Jordan's King Hussein siding with Saddam Hussein? ANSWER: The Jordanian monarch has been trying to walk a difficult diplomatic tightrope of neutrality. In an impassioned Feb. 6 address to his nation, he expressed the strongest possible sympathy and support for the Iraqi people, particularly the civilians enduring relentless bombardment and critical shortages of food, fuel, heat and water.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | Associated Press
President Clinton is urging Japan, Germany, France and other creditor nations to cancel or defer Jordan's debts to help its new young king cope with a faltering economy. King Abdullah II arrived Friday for a weeklong official visit that will include a meeting with Clinton at the White House on Tuesday and talks with Cabinet officials and members of Congress.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III pressed the Palestinians on Friday to come to terms with Israel's demand for limits on who can represent them at a Middle East peace conference, and he later enlisted Jordan's King Hussein to encourage the Palestinians to compromise.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave final approval Friday to a bill authorizing $42.6 billion in U.S. and allied payments toward the cost of the Persian Gulf War, including a $655-million package of benefits for Desert Storm troops and veterans. Before departing on a two-week Easter recess, lawmakers also passed a related $4.8-billion "dire emergency" money bill that contains $650 million for Israel and $200 million for Turkey to defray war-related costs. Both measures were sent to President Bush for his signature.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
House and Senate negotiators shook hands on a multi-billion dollar spending bill after easing a proposal to slash aid to Jordan. The lawmakers softened the aid cut after the proposal prompted veto threats from White House budget chief Richard Darman. Legislators granted President Bush the power to restore the $57.2 million cut by declaring that King Hussein is working toward peace in the Middle East.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Setting up a potential collision between the White House and Congress over America's postwar policy in the Middle East, the Senate voted Wednesday to cut all economic and military aid to Jordan this year in retaliation for Jordan's support of Iraq. The action pitted Democrats determined to make other nations accountable for the Persian Gulf crisis against a President insistent on retaining full latitude in handling foreign policy.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
QUESTION: Is Jordan's King Hussein siding with Saddam Hussein? ANSWER: The Jordanian monarch has been trying to walk a difficult diplomatic tightrope of neutrality. In an impassioned Feb. 6 address to his nation, he expressed the strongest possible sympathy and support for the Iraqi people, particularly the civilians enduring relentless bombardment and critical shortages of food, fuel, heat and water.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A split between the United States and its European allies is stalling plans to aid Jordan, one of the countries suffering most from the effects of U.N. Security Council sanctions against Iraq. The split became public Friday as Italian Foreign Minister Gianni De Michelis, current chairman of the European Community, briefed reporters on the Europeans' increasingly independent foreign policy.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign tourists have vanished, Red Sea dockworkers are idle and 70% of the national truck fleet is off the road. International air tickets out of Amman carry a $100 war-risk surcharge. Jordan is paying a heavy price for the international sanctions against neighboring Iraq--and is demanding help to offset it. "Our economy was pitiful before the trouble began.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Setting up a potential collision between the White House and Congress over America's postwar policy in the Middle East, the Senate voted Wednesday to cut all economic and military aid to Jordan this year in retaliation for Jordan's support of Iraq. The action pitted Democrats determined to make other nations accountable for the Persian Gulf crisis against a President insistent on retaining full latitude in handling foreign policy.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign tourists have vanished, Red Sea dockworkers are idle and 70% of the national truck fleet is off the road. International air tickets out of Amman carry a $100 war-risk surcharge. Jordan is paying a heavy price for the international sanctions against neighboring Iraq--and is demanding help to offset it. "Our economy was pitiful before the trouble began.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is quietly orchestrating a massive infusion of international aid for Jordan despite evidence that truckloads of supplies are still pouring across the Jordanian border into Iraq, undercutting the U.S.-backed embargo. Sources said the aid package, to be unveiled this week, will emphasize large initial payments from Japan and Saudi Arabia in an effort to avoid the embarrassing specter of direct U.S. assistance to a non-cooperating nation.
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