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July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
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NEWS
August 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
A U.S. food airlift gained momentum Sunday, delivering 216 tons of split peas and wheat flour in 18 flights to northeastern Kenya. Three giant C-141 Starlifters and six of the smaller C-130 Hercules transport planes made two trips each from the Indian Ocean port of Mombasa to the northeastern town of Wajir. Most of the food is destined for about 1 million Kenyans suffering from a two-year drought. A smaller amount is going to 320,000 Somali refugees who fled drought and warfare in their country.
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NEWS
August 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
A U.S. food airlift gained momentum Sunday, delivering 216 tons of split peas and wheat flour in 18 flights to northeastern Kenya. Three giant C-141 Starlifters and six of the smaller C-130 Hercules transport planes made two trips each from the Indian Ocean port of Mombasa to the northeastern town of Wajir. Most of the food is destined for about 1 million Kenyans suffering from a two-year drought. A smaller amount is going to 320,000 Somali refugees who fled drought and warfare in their country.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, the affair of the "sinister" schoolbooks. U.S. Ambassador Smith Hempstone is under attack here for donating a package of textbooks, including autobiographies of some seminal American black figures, to a dirt-poor government school during a tour of the Kenyan countryside in late January. The books have been seized by the local police and termed "sinister" by the area's member of Parliament. They have become the occasion for a new outburst of anti-U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new crackdown on political dissent, authorities here have arrested for the third time the editor and publisher of an outspoken law magazine and have moved to confiscate copies of that publication and two others critical of Kenya's one-party government. The steps seem certain to reignite criticism of the Kenyan government's human-rights record by Western countries, especially the United States, which are its key aid donors. Millions of dollars of crucial foreign aid could be jeopardized.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could be a signal of a renewed crackdown on political opposition in this one-party country, the government Saturday announced a permanent ban on the Nairobi Law Monthly, a leading voice of dissent. It was the fourth time in two years that the government had banned a politically outspoken periodical, although Kenya's constitution guarantees freedom of the press.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, the affair of the "sinister" schoolbooks. U.S. Ambassador Smith Hempstone is under attack here for donating a package of textbooks, including autobiographies of some seminal American black figures, to a dirt-poor government school during a tour of the Kenyan countryside in late January. The books have been seized by the local police and termed "sinister" by the area's member of Parliament. They have become the occasion for a new outburst of anti-U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new crackdown on political dissent, authorities here have arrested for the third time the editor and publisher of an outspoken law magazine and have moved to confiscate copies of that publication and two others critical of Kenya's one-party government. The steps seem certain to reignite criticism of the Kenyan government's human-rights record by Western countries, especially the United States, which are its key aid donors. Millions of dollars of crucial foreign aid could be jeopardized.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could be a signal of a renewed crackdown on political opposition in this one-party country, the government Saturday announced a permanent ban on the Nairobi Law Monthly, a leading voice of dissent. It was the fourth time in two years that the government had banned a politically outspoken periodical, although Kenya's constitution guarantees freedom of the press.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
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