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United States Foreign Aid Latin America

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NEWS
August 29, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
Colombian Justice Minister Monica de Greiff, shielded by extraordinarily tight security because her country's cocaine barons have threatened to kill her, conferred with Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and other American officials Monday about U.S.-Colombian cooperation to bring narcotics traffickers to trial in the United States.
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NEWS
October 25, 1998 | Reuters
The Clinton administration is helping put together a $30-billion international aid package to help Brazil and other Latin American nations survive the turmoil in global financial markets, the New York Times reported today. The package would include direct aid and loan guarantees from individual nations and world organizations, the Times quoted U.S. and foreign officials as saying.
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NEWS
October 14, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton announced that the United States will provide $3.75 million over five years to help create pilot programs to reform education throughout Latin America. The money will help fund the Partnership for Education Reform Alternative, a program approved by the hemisphere's leaders during last December's Summit of the Americas in Miami. The announcement came after Mrs. Clinton visited one of the Chilean capital's poorest slums. Mrs.
NEWS
September 17, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday turned aside Clinton administration objections and overwhelmingly passed a $3.2-billion bill to bolster the Coast Guard, the Customs Service and Latin American governments in their struggle to stop drugs from reaching this country's borders. The House of Representatives passed the bill, 384 to 39, just hours after White House drug czar Barry R.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House has ordered a full-scale review of U.S. policy in Latin America with the intention of developing a new package of economic aid for the region similar to that now in place for Eastern Europe's emerging democracies, sources said Saturday. Senior U.S. officials said the effort reflects a personal desire by President Bush to adopt a more activist policy on Latin America.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in another major effort to help Latin America, is preparing a proposal to establish a multibillion-dollar international aid program for the region similar to the one the Western powers set up last year for Eastern Europe. Although President Bush has not given final approval to the plan, U.S. officials say he is likely to unveil it at next week's seven-nation economic summit in Houston.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, facing resistance from a key Democratic senator over the proposed cost, asserted Tuesday that his requested $800-million aid package for Panama and Nicaragua could help bring democracy to Fidel Castro's Cuba. "I'm terribly disappointed that Castro seems to be firming up his totalitarian position instead of moving towards free and fair elections," the President told a bipartisan group of congressional leaders at the White House.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration is facing growing pressure from Congress and business to provide sweeping debt relief to Latin American debtor countries--a push that is likely to create a serious flap over the Third World debt issue later this year. Democrats on the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee are renewing their effort to create a new international agency that would buy up Third World loans from commercial banks and refinance them--at a discount--to debtor countries.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Imagine a Latin America ruled by leftist governments that are hostile to the United States: Debtor countries there default on loans to big U.S. banks. And some $40 billion in American exports are no longer welcome.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton announced that the United States will provide $3.75 million over five years to help create pilot programs to reform education throughout Latin America. The money will help fund the Partnership for Education Reform Alternative, a program approved by the hemisphere's leaders during last December's Summit of the Americas in Miami. The announcement came after Mrs. Clinton visited one of the Chilean capital's poorest slums. Mrs.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Just by spending this week in South America while he has so much to worry about elsewhere, President Bush is delivering a much-appreciated message of high esteem for that oft-forgotten part of the globe. And not since President John F. Kennedy was forging his Alliance for Progress have expectations on the continent for strengthened U.S.-Latin American ties been so great.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in another major effort to help Latin America, is preparing a proposal to establish a multibillion-dollar international aid program for the region similar to the one the Western powers set up last year for Eastern Europe. Although President Bush has not given final approval to the plan, U.S. officials say he is likely to unveil it at next week's seven-nation economic summit in Houston.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House has ordered a full-scale review of U.S. policy in Latin America with the intention of developing a new package of economic aid for the region similar to that now in place for Eastern Europe's emerging democracies, sources said Saturday. Senior U.S. officials said the effort reflects a personal desire by President Bush to adopt a more activist policy on Latin America.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, facing resistance from a key Democratic senator over the proposed cost, asserted Tuesday that his requested $800-million aid package for Panama and Nicaragua could help bring democracy to Fidel Castro's Cuba. "I'm terribly disappointed that Castro seems to be firming up his totalitarian position instead of moving towards free and fair elections," the President told a bipartisan group of congressional leaders at the White House.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, claiming his anti-drug fight already is showing signs of success, Thursday unveiled Phase II--same policy, more money. The new plan contains no major departures from the first phase of the drug war, which was begun last year. However, it requests a substantial increase in funds--roughly $1.1 billion more, for a total of $10.6 billion. "We've made some notable progress," Bush told members of the American Newspaper Publisher's Assn.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | Reuters
The Clinton administration is helping put together a $30-billion international aid package to help Brazil and other Latin American nations survive the turmoil in global financial markets, the New York Times reported today. The package would include direct aid and loan guarantees from individual nations and world organizations, the Times quoted U.S. and foreign officials as saying.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1989 | MOLLY SINCLAIR, WASHINGTON POST
Deborah Szekely was 62 years old and admittedly starting to feel lazy when she found the challenge she wanted as president of the Inter-American Foundation, a small, federally funded foundation that works in Latin America. There were some who questioned whether Szekely, a Republican who became a millionaire by running a health spa for the overweight rich, was the right person to help poor Latin Americans. But Szekely, now 67, quickly proved that she could do the work and do it well.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a potential change in congressional sentiment, staunch pro-Israel Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) called Tuesday for shifting at least $330 million in U.S. foreign aid from Israel and four other key recipients to Panama, Latin America's drug-fighting countries and Eastern Europe's "new democracies."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1989 | MOLLY SINCLAIR, WASHINGTON POST
Deborah Szekely was 62 years old and admittedly starting to feel lazy when she found the challenge she wanted as president of the Inter-American Foundation, a small, federally funded foundation that works in Latin America. There were some who questioned whether Szekely, a Republican who became a millionaire by running a health spa for the overweight rich, was the right person to help poor Latin Americans. But Szekely, now 67, quickly proved that she could do the work and do it well.
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