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United States Foreign Aid Mexico

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BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to initiate congressional action by the end of the week, U.S. and Mexican officials met throughout the day Monday, hammering out details of the multibillion-dollar loan program the Clinton Administration is assembling to help bail out the Mexican economy. The Administration faces an undercurrent of pressure from members of Congress to attach conditions to the aid package, including strict provisions attacking illegal immigration.
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NEWS
August 21, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mexican President-elect Vicente Fox arrives in Washington this week, he has every reason to expect a hero's welcome. After all, he just broke the legendary grip of the world's longest-ruling party with a landslide victory viewed around the world as a triumph for democracy. But while President Clinton can be expected to hail Fox publicly as a harbinger of change, in private conversations administration officials are noticeably more guarded about Mexico's incoming leader.
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NEWS
January 31, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With support seeming to hemorrhage as the Clinton Administration tries to contain its first potential international economic crisis, the White House and its congressional allies rushed Monday to prepare legislation granting loan guarantees to Mexico.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Vicente Fox announced Thursday that he is bringing an ambitious plan to Washington aimed at strengthening ties--including a proposed fund through which the United States would help assist Mexico's development. Fox, who ousted the world's longest-ruling party in July 2 elections, emphasized that his trip to Canada and the United States next week is aimed at sharing ideas rather than reaching accords.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Vicente Fox announced Thursday that he is bringing an ambitious plan to Washington aimed at strengthening ties--including a proposed fund through which the United States would help assist Mexico's development. Fox, who ousted the world's longest-ruling party in July 2 elections, emphasized that his trip to Canada and the United States next week is aimed at sharing ideas rather than reaching accords.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mexico to Repay Portion of Debt to U.S.: The government will repay $1.3 billion of its remaining $11.8-billion debt to the United States on Monday, U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin said. After the Mexican economy collapsed in late 1994, the United States agreed to lend the country $20 billion. Of that, $12.5 billion was actually lent and $750 million has been repaid. The latest repayment will lower the debt to $10.5 billion.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Get a grip, America. The Mexican economy is going through a crisis of confidence as its politics undergo a transformation as great as the downfall of Communism in Russia. Judgment and cool perspective are needed. But instead, there is the sad spectacle of prominent Americans crying that they were "fooled" last year by Mexico's leaders and the peso devaluation at the end of the year.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton is portrayed as a lifeguard in a recent editorial cartoon in the independent newspaper Reforma. As he saves a drowning Finance Minister Guillermo Ortiz, Clinton advises, "Don't worry, be happy." The joke is bitter for most Mexicans. Despite last week's pledge of a huge U.S. bailout package, there is little to cheer and much to worry about. While the promised U.S.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could further strain U.S.-Mexican relations, the Bush Administration will report this week that Mexico produces 10 times more marijuana than the United States previously had estimated, The Times has learned. The conclusion, based on new satellite surveillance by the CIA, establishes Mexico as by far the world's leading marijuana grower and gives credence to longstanding suspicions that its government has understated the country's drug-producing role.
NEWS
November 24, 1988
Mexico and the United States will begin Cabinet-level talks in December to seek new ways to alleviate Mexico's $100-billion foreign debt, President-elect Carlos Salinas de Gortari told reporters, one day after his meeting with President-elect George Bush in Houston. Salinas, who takes office Dec. 1, spoke to reporters on his return flight to Mexico City.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeing the potential to stem immigration, California officials are checking out economic development efforts in Mexico that tap immigrants here to finance jobs in their homeland. Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa on Thursday took a detour from his trip pressing the flesh of top Mexican officials to swing by the Jaliscan pueblo of Etzatlan and examine furniture and clothing manufactured with the help of funding by immigrants in the United States.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed to have all the makings of a feel-good event: a visit Tuesday by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to a family planning center supported by U.S. funds in a hardscrabble Mexican neighborhood. The only hitch: The United States has decided to ax funds for the center--something that has left its director incredulous. "We don't understand the U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexico announced Wednesday that it is repaying the last of the U.S. emergency bailout package three years early, putting a symbolic end to its disastrous peso crisis and handing President Clinton an unexpected foreign policy victory. The $3.5-billion payment was the last chunk of a $13.5-billion emergency U.S. loan, part of Washington's biggest foreign financial-aid commitment since the Marshall Plan.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A euphoric Mexican government announced Thursday that it will shortly repay two-thirds of the $10.5 billion it still owes the United States, an unexpectedly early payback that reflects a surge in investor confidence in Mexico and points toward success for the Clinton administration's much-criticized bailout of the southern neighbor.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bold move that marks its return to international financial respectability, Mexico announced Tuesday that it will repay--more than two years early--nearly half the money it owes from last year's emergency U.S. bailout. Mexico said it will repay $4.7 billion of the $10.5 billion it owes the United States, mainly by taking out loans from private international investors through sales of government bonds and notes.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Pat Buchanan, it's a colossal rip-off--a $50-billion Mexican bailout that, he thunders, "you and me and your children and grandchildren" will wind up paying for. Well, folks--as the folksy Republican presidential candidate might say--you're in for a surprise. You, me, Buchanan and America's grandchildren have actually turned a $750-million-plus profit so far on the U.S. government's controversial loan to Mexico.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
A 4-month-old offer by the United States to provide a $3.5-billion "bridge" loan to Mexico to help stabilize that country's economy is about to die on the vine unused, aggravating the tension between the two countries that it was intended to ease. The Reagan Administration announced the offer last October, hoping it would help Mexican officials avert new economic and political turmoil before Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari--then just elected--took office on Dec. 1.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has staked his reputation on his government's ability to negotiate a substantial reduction in Mexico's $102-billion foreign debt, and officials say he must do so by the end of July, when an anti-inflation package of wage and price controls expires.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican government won praise Monday from U.S. officials and a guarded reaction from independent analysts as it made a $1.3-billion repayment on its $12.5 billion in U.S. loans, largely by going to international markets to restructure its debt. Mexico came up with more than $1 billion of the payment through a recent sale of Mexican government bonds, mostly to German investors, officials said.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mexico to Repay Portion of Debt to U.S.: The government will repay $1.3 billion of its remaining $11.8-billion debt to the United States on Monday, U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin said. After the Mexican economy collapsed in late 1994, the United States agreed to lend the country $20 billion. Of that, $12.5 billion was actually lent and $750 million has been repaid. The latest repayment will lower the debt to $10.5 billion.
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