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United States Foreign Aid Nicaragua

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NEWS
April 4, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House gave overwhelming, bipartisan approval Tuesday to $720 million in economic aid for Nicaragua and Panama, meeting President Bush's request for speedy action. But Senate Democratic leaders continued on a partisan course likely to result in funding delays.
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NEWS
March 25, 1999 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday narrowly approved a bill to provide nearly $1 billion in disaster assistance for Central American countries still struggling to recover from Hurricane Mitch. The Senate passed a similar bill Tuesday and lawmakers expressed hope that the measure--which also includes aid for U.S. farmers hit by economic hard times--could make money available in time for the spring planting season.
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NEWS
March 9, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of a volcano where a wall of mud took 2,000 lives last autumn, President Clinton paid homage Monday to the victims of tropical storm Mitch and pledged renewed U.S. support as Nicaragua tries to rebuild. "We are brothers and sisters," Clinton said in Spanish, before continuing in English, "neighbors and friends. We must help each other."
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of a volcano where a wall of mud took 2,000 lives last autumn, President Clinton paid homage Monday to the victims of tropical storm Mitch and pledged renewed U.S. support as Nicaragua tries to rebuild. "We are brothers and sisters," Clinton said in Spanish, before continuing in English, "neighbors and friends. We must help each other."
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overriding the objections of conservative Republicans, the Clinton Administration said Friday that the government of President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro in Nicaragua has improved its economic and human rights performance sufficiently to qualify for $50 million in impounded foreign aid funds. "Nicaragua needs our assistance to continue on its path of economic reform and reconstruction of the country," State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said in announcing the release of the funds.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States and more than 30 other donors pledged $300 million in aid to breathe new life into Nicaragua's economy, which has been exhausted by war and sanctions. Speaking at the end of a conference in Rome, President Francisco Mayorga of the Nicaraguan Central Bank said, "This is far more than we had even hoped for." The conference was called to pledge funds for an emergency package requested by the new U.S.-backed government of President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Thursday authorized $770 million in emergency aid for Panama and Nicaragua but put off a vote on actual appropriations until after its Easter recess, despite repeated pleas by President Bush for swifter action. Senate Democratic Leader George J. Mitchell of Maine said the authorization bill was a necessary first step before the Senate could take up the foreign aid money bill when it returns April 18 from its recess, which starts today.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) indicated Monday that Congress will withhold a large sum of emergency aid for Panama and Nicaragua until the Administration develops a comprehensive foreign aid plan.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From the Times Washington Bureau
NEW ENVIRONMENT: When President Bush chose him to head the Environmental Protection Agency, William K. Reilly was considered a nonpartisan, patrician defender of the earth and all its creatures. Conservatives viewed him suspiciously. No more. Now Reilly is giving sharply partisan stump speeches, winning cheers from audiences, such as the recent Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Raleigh, N.C.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration plans to begin paying for reintegrating the Contras into Nicaraguan society by spending $3.6 million that remains from an appropriation once intended to maintain the rebel army, the White House announced Monday. Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater described the step as a "stopgap measure" that will not be enough to complete the repatriation of an estimated 28,000 Contras and their families, most of them now living in rebel encampments in Honduras.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a century, politics here has been intertwined with events in Washington. Fortunes in Managua often depended on who was up and who was down in American government. And Nicaraguans routinely turned to their U.S. allies to resolve domestic problems. So last month's GOP sweep of Congress sent heads here spinning, and the likely return of far-right Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) to a powerful position in foreign policy has become a matter of intense debate.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overriding the objections of conservative Republicans, the Clinton Administration said Friday that the government of President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro in Nicaragua has improved its economic and human rights performance sufficiently to qualify for $50 million in impounded foreign aid funds. "Nicaragua needs our assistance to continue on its path of economic reform and reconstruction of the country," State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said in announcing the release of the funds.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With elections scheduled for October in Peru, the Bush Administration has slightly relaxed its freeze on aid to the government of President Alberto Fujimori, a State Department official said Wednesday. Fujimori angered Washington and other Western Hemisphere governments April 12 when he suspended the Peruvian Congress, ousted the country's judges and suspended all political parties.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States pardoned Nicaragua's government debt to Washington, wiping $259.5 million off the Central American country's overall $9-billion foreign debt. The pardoned debt was accumulated by Nicaraguan administrations in the 1960s, '70s and '80s. It represented 88% of Nicaragua's total debt with the United States. About $30 million is still owed to the U.S. Export-Import Bank from loans predating Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista government of the 1980s, a U.S. official said.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush pledged Wednesday to help Nicaragua meet its overdue loan payments and establish normal economic relations with international financial institutions. "One way or another, we will do it," Bush told Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro during a White House meeting. She responded: "I will sleep better tonight because of that commitment."
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro declared her country free of "the delirium of a totalitarian ideology" Tuesday but pleaded with Congress for at least 10 years of financial aid to save the nation from economic disaster after a long and bloody civil war.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
Bush Administration officials met Monday with advisers to Nicaraguan President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and said afterward that they plan to propose hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. aid for Nicaragua even before Chamorro is inaugurated April 25. Both American and Nicaraguan officials who participated in the talks declined to divulge the amount under discussion.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, facing resistance from a key Democratic senator over the proposed cost, asserted Tuesday that his requested $800-million aid package for Panama and Nicaragua could help bring democracy to Fidel Castro's Cuba. "I'm terribly disappointed that Castro seems to be firming up his totalitarian position instead of moving towards free and fair elections," the President told a bipartisan group of congressional leaders at the White House.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dagoberto Perez landed a job sketching performance charts for the new Sandinista government's Construction Ministry in 1980, most of the lines he drew pointed upward. Soon came the Contra war and the hard times, but on his $200-a-month salary, Perez still managed to buy a truck while supporting his growing family in a squatter shack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicaraguan President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, on her way to Asia and Europe seeking financial aid for her war-torn country, stopped in Los Angeles on Saturday for an emotional reunion with hundreds of expatriates. She also paid a brief call to former President Ronald Reagan, speaking with him privately in his Century City office before addressing about 400 exiles at the Century Plaza Hotel.
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