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United States Foreign Aid North Korea

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NEWS
November 3, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a German medical aid organization asked to set up a program to rehabilitate decrepit hospitals here, North Korean negotiators demanded a $30,000 fee from the group for the privilege. The founder of the group balked, saying that it never paid a state for providing assistance. The compromise: The group, German Emergency Doctors, paid the fee with imported rice instead of cash. Beggars usually can't be choosers, but North Korea is clearly an exception to that rule.
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NEWS
November 3, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a German medical aid organization asked to set up a program to rehabilitate decrepit hospitals here, North Korean negotiators demanded a $30,000 fee from the group for the privilege. The founder of the group balked, saying that it never paid a state for providing assistance. The compromise: The group, German Emergency Doctors, paid the fee with imported rice instead of cash. Beggars usually can't be choosers, but North Korea is clearly an exception to that rule.
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NEWS
August 31, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Korea is a medical disaster area where antibiotics and other basic medications are lacking and surgery is performed without anesthesia, said a visiting U.S. congressman who urged Monday that disputes over North Korea's missile program not be allowed to obscure a continuing humanitarian disaster.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last few years, the common assumption among U.S. defense officials was that North Korea's million-strong army was deteriorating, a victim of the country's dire economic plight. Not so, it turns out. To the surprise of U.S. officials, North Korea has in recent months carried out extensive military exercises--raising politically charged questions about how international food aid to the Communist regime in Pyongyang is being used. Adm. Dennis Cutler Blair, the commander in chief of U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last few years, the common assumption among U.S. defense officials was that North Korea's million-strong army was deteriorating, a victim of the country's dire economic plight. Not so, it turns out. To the surprise of U.S. officials, North Korea has in recent months carried out extensive military exercises--raising politically charged questions about how international food aid to the Communist regime in Pyongyang is being used. Adm. Dennis Cutler Blair, the commander in chief of U.S.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside criticism by presumptive Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole, the Clinton administration announced Wednesday that it will provide North Korea with $6.2 million in emergency food aid to help the Communist regime avert a famine. The administration's action marks the second time this year that it has given food aid to North Korea. U.S. officials said they are studying the possibility of also easing economic sanctions. "We're convinced that the food situation [in North Korea] .
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Responding to an emergency U.N. appeal, the United States will provide North Korea with an additional $15 million in food aid targeted at children under 6 years old. The aid, announced Tuesday, increases Washington's relief effort to about $33 million since 1995. State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said the decision was not linked to a North Korean announcement, expected today, on whether to accept a U.S.-South Korean proposal to begin peace talks.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Department spokesman James P. Rubin took issue with a congressional team's contention that U.S. food assistance was going to North Korean soldiers. "As far as we are able to judge, nearly all our assistance thus far has been directed at helping young children," he said. Rubin was responding to an accusation leveled by seven members of Congress who visited North Korea over the weekend. Rep.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration revealed Thursday that, under the agreement it recently signed with North Korea, the Pyongyang regime will get nearly $2 billion in benefits before it has to submit to special international inspections of its nuclear program. South Korea will contribute most of the money by supplying the equipment for new nuclear reactors that will make it much harder for North Korea to make weapons-grade fuel. However, Special Ambassador Robert L.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
As the South Korean Red Cross on Friday shipped blankets and noodles to famine-stricken North Korea, efforts to mount an international relief effort were stymied as negotiations in Honolulu ended without agreement. A Red Cross spokesman said the aid shipment included 100,000 packs of instant noodles, 20,000 pairs of socks and 2,000 blankets.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
North Korea is claiming that it has found the remains of more than 400 U.S. servicemen killed in the Korean War, but U.S. officials said Friday that the assertion may merely be an effort to restart talks on the recovery of remains from the 1950-53 conflict. North Korean officials, who have been pushing to swap remains for economic aid, wrote to American veterans groups this week saying the remains were uncovered during recent excavations in North Pyongan province.
NEWS
August 31, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Korea is a medical disaster area where antibiotics and other basic medications are lacking and surgery is performed without anesthesia, said a visiting U.S. congressman who urged Monday that disputes over North Korea's missile program not be allowed to obscure a continuing humanitarian disaster.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | JIM MANN
This is the story of the millions of dollars President Clinton has just pulled out of his pocket for North Korea, and about the incomprehensible foreign policy that this payment represents. You probably didn't know Clinton had a few extra million dollars lying around. Most people don't. But in fact, like all American presidents, he has a nice little contingency fund. A 1961 law permits a president to spend up to $50 million a year beyond what Congress has provided.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Department spokesman James P. Rubin took issue with a congressional team's contention that U.S. food assistance was going to North Korean soldiers. "As far as we are able to judge, nearly all our assistance thus far has been directed at helping young children," he said. Rubin was responding to an accusation leveled by seven members of Congress who visited North Korea over the weekend. Rep.
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Responding to an emergency U.N. appeal, the United States will provide North Korea with an additional $15 million in food aid targeted at children under 6 years old. The aid, announced Tuesday, increases Washington's relief effort to about $33 million since 1995. State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said the decision was not linked to a North Korean announcement, expected today, on whether to accept a U.S.-South Korean proposal to begin peace talks.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside criticism by presumptive Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole, the Clinton administration announced Wednesday that it will provide North Korea with $6.2 million in emergency food aid to help the Communist regime avert a famine. The administration's action marks the second time this year that it has given food aid to North Korea. U.S. officials said they are studying the possibility of also easing economic sanctions. "We're convinced that the food situation [in North Korea] .
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
North Korea is claiming that it has found the remains of more than 400 U.S. servicemen killed in the Korean War, but U.S. officials said Friday that the assertion may merely be an effort to restart talks on the recovery of remains from the 1950-53 conflict. North Korean officials, who have been pushing to swap remains for economic aid, wrote to American veterans groups this week saying the remains were uncovered during recent excavations in North Pyongan province.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American government analysts have concluded that the nuclear deal the Clinton Administration just negotiated with North Korea will provide significant economic relief for the fledgling regime of its new leader, Kim Jong Il. Although the assistance will probably not make the difference between the eventual survival and collapse of one of the world's last Communist governments, U.S.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
As the South Korean Red Cross on Friday shipped blankets and noodles to famine-stricken North Korea, efforts to mount an international relief effort were stymied as negotiations in Honolulu ended without agreement. A Red Cross spokesman said the aid shipment included 100,000 packs of instant noodles, 20,000 pairs of socks and 2,000 blankets.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration revealed Thursday that, under the agreement it recently signed with North Korea, the Pyongyang regime will get nearly $2 billion in benefits before it has to submit to special international inspections of its nuclear program. South Korea will contribute most of the money by supplying the equipment for new nuclear reactors that will make it much harder for North Korea to make weapons-grade fuel. However, Special Ambassador Robert L.
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