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United States Foreign Aid Pakistan

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NEWS
January 14, 1988
The State Department has concluded that Pakistan was probably involved in a plot to smuggle materials for nuclear devices out of the United States, but it is recommending that aid to Pakistan not be severed, Administration officials said. The findings were in a memorandum sent to President Reagan regarding the case of Arshad Z.
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NEWS
October 15, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The army chief of Pakistan declared a state of emergency early today and appointed himself the nation's leader, just three days after the military ousted and locked up the elected prime minister. Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who led Tuesday's bloodless coup against Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, suspended the constitution, abolished national and provincial parliaments, fired scores of high officials nationwide and declared the country to be under military rule.
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NEWS
April 24, 1987 | From The Washington Post
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted Thursday not to penalize Pakistan for what U.S. intelligence has reported to be a nearly successful drive to acquire nuclear weapons. The 11-8 vote--with Democrats Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut and John F. Kerry of Massachusetts joining all nine committee Republicans--was interpreted on Capitol Hill as a powerful blow to efforts to withhold substantial amounts of U.S. aid from Pakistan.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
A congressional panel agreed provisionally to a one-time waiver of a law against military sales to Pakistan to allow the country to take delivery of millions of dollars worth of U.S. equipment. A House-Senate conference committee accepted as part of a foreign aid bill pending before the panel a plan to resolve a longstanding dispute with Pakistan. It involves shipments of more than $1.4 billion worth of arms.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
A congressional panel agreed provisionally to a one-time waiver of a law against military sales to Pakistan to allow the country to take delivery of millions of dollars worth of U.S. equipment. A House-Senate conference committee accepted as part of a foreign aid bill pending before the panel a plan to resolve a longstanding dispute with Pakistan. It involves shipments of more than $1.4 billion worth of arms.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of suspicion, U.S. officials have concluded that Pakistan has developed a nuclear explosive device, a knowledgeable source said Tuesday. The officials believe that the bomb was completed last spring at the height of increased tension with India over long-disputed Kashmir, the source said.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Senate early today approved $9 million in non-military aid to Nicaragua's Contras as it passed a massive spending bill that also implements part of a deficit-reduction agreement reached last month between the White House and congressional leaders. The vote to provide the additional funding for the Contras was one of several controversial foreign policy provisions attached to the wide-ranging spending bill. Members stood to record their votes, but the total was not announced.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a potential change in congressional sentiment, staunch pro-Israel Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) called Tuesday for shifting at least $330 million in U.S. foreign aid from Israel and four other key recipients to Panama, Latin America's drug-fighting countries and Eastern Europe's "new democracies."
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prime minister of Pakistan, the Islamic world's most advanced nuclear state, appealed Thursday to the United States, the Soviet Union and China to help broker a nuclear non-proliferation pact between his country and neighboring India, rivals that have fought three wars. India is known to possess nuclear-weapons capability, and Pakistan is believed to have it.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About half a billion dollars a year in U.S. military and economic aid to Pakistan has been frozen and payments cannot be resumed until the Islamabad government curtails programs that seem to be intended to produce nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prime minister of Pakistan, the Islamic world's most advanced nuclear state, appealed Thursday to the United States, the Soviet Union and China to help broker a nuclear non-proliferation pact between his country and neighboring India, rivals that have fought three wars. India is known to possess nuclear-weapons capability, and Pakistan is believed to have it.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | United Press International
U.S. Assistant Defense Secretary Henry Rowen on Sunday ended a four-day visit during which he sought to reassure Pakistani leaders of Washington's desire to maintain close ties with its South Asian ally despite fears that Islamabad is developing nuclear weapons. Relations between the two longtime allies have cooled since Washington on Oct. 1 suspended aid to Pakistan because President Bush was unable to certify to Congress that Islamabad was not developing nuclear weapons.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of suspicion, U.S. officials have concluded that Pakistan has developed a nuclear explosive device, a knowledgeable source said Tuesday. The officials believe that the bomb was completed last spring at the height of increased tension with India over long-disputed Kashmir, the source said.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About half a billion dollars a year in U.S. military and economic aid to Pakistan has been frozen and payments cannot be resumed until the Islamabad government curtails programs that seem to be intended to produce nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs said Sunday that Pakistan seems to be going ahead with plans to obtain nuclear weapons and suggested that Congress should cut off the $600-million-a-year U.S. aid program to Islamabad. In a letter to President Bush, Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) asserted that Pakistan has been violating pledges it made to the United States last year to limit its nuclear program. Under existing law, U.S.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a potential change in congressional sentiment, staunch pro-Israel Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) called Tuesday for shifting at least $330 million in U.S. foreign aid from Israel and four other key recipients to Panama, Latin America's drug-fighting countries and Eastern Europe's "new democracies."
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Friday adopted a State Department recommendation to continue U.S. assistance to Pakistan despite evidence that Pakistan tried to smuggle nuclear-weapons material out of the United States--an act that normally would trigger an automatic cutoff of aid. The action effectively releases $480 million in American economic and military assistance for the Pakistanis, who are believed to be developing nuclear weapons in a Third World arms race with India.
NEWS
January 14, 1988
The State Department has concluded that Pakistan was probably involved in a plot to smuggle materials for nuclear devices out of the United States, but it is recommending that aid to Pakistan not be severed, Administration officials said. The findings were in a memorandum sent to President Reagan regarding the case of Arshad Z.
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