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United States Foreign Aid Persian Gulf

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September 10, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women and children--and a greater than expected number of men--landed on American soil Sunday, bringing an end to their mixed bag of war stories, clandestine desert treks and, finally, an unhappy deliverance from Iraqi-occupied Kuwait. Three hundred and five Americans arrived here about 6:15 p.m., becoming the first of the former hostages to leave Kuwait on U.S.-chartered flights that brought Westerners from the war-torn Middle East.
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NEWS
September 10, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Even as President Bush confronts Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in the Mideast and strives to maintain a multinational alliance spanning the globe, he faces an equally critical challenge here at home: sustaining public support for the nation's most far-reaching foreign commitment since Vietnam. So far, nearly everything has gone the President's way. Opinion polls show that well over 70% of the voters approve of his handling of the five-week Mideast crisis.
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NEWS
September 10, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Even as President Bush confronts Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in the Mideast and strives to maintain a multinational alliance spanning the globe, he faces an equally critical challenge here at home: sustaining public support for the nation's most far-reaching foreign commitment since Vietnam. So far, nearly everything has gone the President's way. Opinion polls show that well over 70% of the voters approve of his handling of the five-week Mideast crisis.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From The Times Washington Staff
CONGRESSIONAL KUDOS: President Bush's decision to provide increased Western economic help to the Soviet Union is likely to win broad support when he addresses a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, congressional strategists say. Beleaguered by negative reaction at home to the savings and loan crisis and other national ills, the lawmakers have been "looking for something positive" that they can support, key Capitol Hill watchers say.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From The Times Washington Staff
CONGRESSIONAL KUDOS: President Bush's decision to provide increased Western economic help to the Soviet Union is likely to win broad support when he addresses a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, congressional strategists say. Beleaguered by negative reaction at home to the savings and loan crisis and other national ills, the lawmakers have been "looking for something positive" that they can support, key Capitol Hill watchers say.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Important as the Persian Gulf crisis was at Sunday's summit here, more important still for President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was their own ever-more-cooperative superpower relationship. In three summits held over a little more than nine months, Gorbachev declared Sunday at the joint press conference that followed their final private session, the two leaders have increased their trust in each other. "This is good for all of us," he added.
NEWS
September 10, 1990
George Bush "Nothing shot of the complete implementation (of U.N. resolutions) is acceptable. As soon as Saddam Hussein realizes that, there certainly will be a peaceful resolution to this question.' 'I am very much interested in assisting (the Soviet Union), to be sure that perestroika is successful. . .it seems to me that we should be as forthcoming as we possible can in terms of economics.' 'We did not discuss military options.' Mikhail Gorbachev 'We . . .
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Iraq invaded Kuwait five weeks ago, the Bush Administration has been striving to make sure that Saddam Hussein goes to bed every night not knowing whether he will wake up to the thunder of U.S. military force. At their otherwise harmonious summit meeting Sunday, however, President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev differed sharply on that approach, with Gorbachev insisting at a joint press conference that Moscow is firmly opposed to the military option.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While superpower leaders met Sunday in cool Finland to press for Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait, preparations were being made under Iraq's roasting desert sun to hold out against the tight international blockade and to defend the nation in case of war. The government made no official response to the joint statement of President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Helsinki summit.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday afternoon, construction of a huge transit camp here to house 35,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait, originally planned for a weekend opening, was far behind schedule but moving along nicely. Bulldozers had carved geometric lanes and squares through the rocky desert, water pipe waited to be laid, sweating Red Cross officials had erected 168 tents and hundreds more were ready for assembly.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Important as the Persian Gulf crisis was at Sunday's summit here, more important still for President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was their own ever-more-cooperative superpower relationship. In three summits held over a little more than nine months, Gorbachev declared Sunday at the joint press conference that followed their final private session, the two leaders have increased their trust in each other. "This is good for all of us," he added.
NEWS
September 10, 1990
George Bush "Nothing shot of the complete implementation (of U.N. resolutions) is acceptable. As soon as Saddam Hussein realizes that, there certainly will be a peaceful resolution to this question.' 'I am very much interested in assisting (the Soviet Union), to be sure that perestroika is successful. . .it seems to me that we should be as forthcoming as we possible can in terms of economics.' 'We did not discuss military options.' Mikhail Gorbachev 'We . . .
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Iraq invaded Kuwait five weeks ago, the Bush Administration has been striving to make sure that Saddam Hussein goes to bed every night not knowing whether he will wake up to the thunder of U.S. military force. At their otherwise harmonious summit meeting Sunday, however, President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev differed sharply on that approach, with Gorbachev insisting at a joint press conference that Moscow is firmly opposed to the military option.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While superpower leaders met Sunday in cool Finland to press for Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait, preparations were being made under Iraq's roasting desert sun to hold out against the tight international blockade and to defend the nation in case of war. The government made no official response to the joint statement of President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Helsinki summit.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday afternoon, construction of a huge transit camp here to house 35,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait, originally planned for a weekend opening, was far behind schedule but moving along nicely. Bulldozers had carved geometric lanes and squares through the rocky desert, water pipe waited to be laid, sweating Red Cross officials had erected 168 tents and hundreds more were ready for assembly.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
Here is the text of the joint statement issued by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Sunday at the close of their summit: We are united in the belief that Iraq's aggression must not be tolerated. No peaceful international order is possible if larger states can devour their smaller neighbors. We reaffirm the joint statement of our foreign ministers of Aug. 3, 1990, and our support for United Nations Security Council Resolutions 660, 661, 662, 664 and 665.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | JACK NELSON and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With officials concerned that time is working against the United States as well as against the beleaguered regime of Iraq's Saddam Hussein, President Bush arrived here Saturday determined to project a picture of superpower unity in the Persian Gulf. Earlier, Administration officials had sent strong signals that they would welcome a greater military commitment from Moscow in the gulf, including the deployment of Soviet ground forces.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
Here is the text of the joint statement issued by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Sunday at the close of their summit: We are united in the belief that Iraq's aggression must not be tolerated. No peaceful international order is possible if larger states can devour their smaller neighbors. We reaffirm the joint statement of our foreign ministers of Aug. 3, 1990, and our support for United Nations Security Council Resolutions 660, 661, 662, 664 and 665.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev issued a strongly worded joint statement Sunday declaring unconditional support for economic and political sanctions against Iraq and warning that if current steps fail, they are "prepared to take additional ones consistent with the U.N. Charter." "We are united in the belief that Iraq's aggression must not be tolerated," the leaders of the two nuclear superpowers declared at the conclusion of a one-day summit meeting here.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
Barbara Bush and Raisa Gorbachev leafed through the pages of history in Finland's national library on Sunday while their husbands tried to find a peaceful solution to the Persian Gulf crisis. The U.S. and Soviet first ladies, touring the Helsinki University Library, pored over ancient books, manuscripts and maps, including the oldest known Moscow city map and an early American map showing California as an island.
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