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United States Foreign Aid Poland

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NEWS
March 21, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that the United States will reduce Poland's outstanding debt to the United States by 70%. The decrease, which goes beyond an agreement by Western allies to cut Poland's international debt in half, will lop more than $2.6 billion from the amount Poland owes the U.S. Treasury, leaving the longstanding debt at approximately $1.2 billion, U.S. government officials said.
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NEWS
April 21, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will promote Poland as a model for other Eastern European nations, Vice President Al Gore told Poles on Tuesday, promising that U.S. efforts to help Russia would not detract from American interest in their country. Gore, closing his first official journey abroad as vice president, told lawmakers and other dignitaries here that Poland is important in part "because it is showing the way to the future for an enormous part of the globe."
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NEWS
July 4, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, asserting that there is "no danger at all of an invasion of Poland from the West," suggested Monday that the Soviet Union begin withdrawing its troops from Poland. Bush made the suggestion in a pre-Fourth of July interview with three Polish journalists. He also said that he hopes to see a continuation of internal reforms in Poland "that would result in . . . the Soviets feeling comfortable in taking their troops out of there."
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With President Bush and Polish President Lech Walesa looking on, the remains of Ignace Jan Paderewski, perhaps the greatest modern personification of fervent Polish patriotism, were brought to their final resting place Sunday in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, 51 years after the statesman and musician died in exile in New York City while the Nazis occupied his homeland.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With President Bush and Polish President Lech Walesa looking on, the remains of Ignace Jan Paderewski, perhaps the greatest modern personification of fervent Polish patriotism, were brought to their final resting place Sunday in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, 51 years after the statesman and musician died in exile in New York City while the Nazis occupied his homeland.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | United Press International
U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady paid a short consultative visit to Poland on Sunday to discuss speeding up American aid as the nation undergoes economic stabilization, the official news agency PAP said. Brady held talks with Deputy Prime Minister Leszek Balcerowicz and Wladyslaw Baka, president of the Polish National Bank. Balcerowicz, who is also finance minister, said the U.S.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Polish President Lech Walesa arrived in Washington for talks with President Bush as a senior Administration official said the United States will increase its commitment to forgive a portion of Poland's debt. Western nations agreed last Friday to forgive at least 50% of Poland's $33 billion debt to foreign governments. The United States will "go beyond the 50%," the official said.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush announced Tuesday that the United States will provide up to $50 million in food aid for Poland to help avert shortages in the country as it struggles to reform its government and economy. Bush, who visited Poland last month, said the food "will assist in alleviating the impact of market price reforms and support continued efforts toward economic and political liberalization."
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
For those with any memory of the bad old days in Eastern Europe, President Bush's journey through Poland and Hungary this week was nothing short of astonishing--from the Warsaw lunch at which Communists and once-jailed opposition leaders joined in toasting the United States, to the Hungarian military band that saluted Bush with a spirited rendition of "The Stars and Stripes Forever." "(The) change is absolutely amazing," Bush marveled aboard Air Force One as he left Eastern Europe on Thursday.
NEWS
July 11, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and CHARLES POWERS, Times Staff Writer s
From the rococo quarters of Poland's Communist government to the gray marble chambers of its newly elected Parliament, President Bush won polite applause Monday for his proposals to revive the country's moribund economy. But no sooner was Bush out the door than economists on both sides of Poland's political divide said the U.S. plan falls well short of what the country needs to recover from years of economic crisis and continue its move toward democracy.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1992 | Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission said it is sending a technical adviser to the Polish securities commission for one year as part of a U.S. program to aid business development in the region. "This is part of a broader commitment on the part of President Bush to provide economic assistance to countries in Eastern Europe," SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden said.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that the United States will reduce Poland's outstanding debt to the United States by 70%. The decrease, which goes beyond an agreement by Western allies to cut Poland's international debt in half, will lop more than $2.6 billion from the amount Poland owes the U.S. Treasury, leaving the longstanding debt at approximately $1.2 billion, U.S. government officials said.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Polish President Lech Walesa arrived in Washington for talks with President Bush as a senior Administration official said the United States will increase its commitment to forgive a portion of Poland's debt. Western nations agreed last Friday to forgive at least 50% of Poland's $33 billion debt to foreign governments. The United States will "go beyond the 50%," the official said.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to reward Poland's dramatic efforts to embrace democracy and a free-market economy, the United States and other Western nations have agreed to forgive half of Warsaw's massive foreign debt, U.S. and European officials announced Friday. The move to wipe out 50% of Poland's $30.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Lech Walesa, about to leave on his first visit to the United States as head of state, is hoping to win agreement in Washington on a reduction of up to 80% in the Polish debt and will be trying to woo Polish-American investors to help accelerate his country's drive to modernize the economy.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the United States "must export our experience," President Bush announced a series of low-cost measures Saturday intended to coordinate voluntary support for the democratic movements in Eastern Europe. He also announced a modest expansion of loans to Poland by the U.S. Export-Import Bank. And in an effort to promote "free and fair elections" in Eastern Europe, Bush said that he would send presidential delegations to observe elections in Romania and Bulgaria.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
As President Bush launches a busy two-day schedule in Poland today, he will find a country, perhaps somewhat bewilderingly, locked in the toils of one of the most important questions facing the reforming Communist nations of Eastern Europe. Poland, the perennial pioneer in political experiment, is trying to determine if there is a future for liberal Communists in the changing Communist world. The answer, as evidence in Poland so far suggests, is no.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Bush and the other leaders at the annual summit meeting of seven major industrial democracies agreed Saturday to take concerted action in support of economic reforms that have been launched in Poland and Hungary. But apart from promising to funnel surplus food to Poland through the European Community, the summit leaders did not pledge any specific sum of financial aid to the two East European countries.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | United Press International
U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady paid a short consultative visit to Poland on Sunday to discuss speeding up American aid as the nation undergoes economic stabilization, the official news agency PAP said. Brady held talks with Deputy Prime Minister Leszek Balcerowicz and Wladyslaw Baka, president of the Polish National Bank. Balcerowicz, who is also finance minister, said the U.S.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers of 24 of the world's richest nations approved an economic aid package for Poland and Hungary on Wednesday, including just over $1 billion in grants and loans that will permit Poland to stabilize its economy and make its now largely worthless currency convertible on international foreign exchange markets.
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