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United States Foreign Aid Russia

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NEWS
September 15, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under prodding from Moscow, the Bush Administration announced Monday a $1.15-billion expansion of U.S. agricultural aid to help Russia endure another food crisis expected this winter. Faced with forecasts of a shortfall again in the Russian harvest, as well as continuing signs of severe disruptions in the Russian food distribution system, the Bush Administration responded to requests two weeks ago from Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin for quick action on food aid before the onset of winter. U.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 2001 | Reuters
Russia pondered the prospect of tougher economic relations with the U.S. after suggestions by President-elect George W. Bush that financial aid should be linked to guarantees against corruption. Commentators said the tougher line in a weekend interview with the New York Times represented a major change after eight years of Bill Clinton's administration.
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NEWS
February 1, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia warned the new, Republican-led U.S. Congress on Tuesday to refrain from "confrontational outbursts" and appeals to "punish Russia" by restricting American aid. The unusually strong warning by Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Grigory Karasin was a response to a bill introduced last month in the House of Representatives by Rep. Gerald B.H. Solomon (R-N.Y.), one of a growing number of GOP lawmakers who want to make U.S.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration blocked $498 million in loan guarantees to Russia on Tuesday, in a striking signal of displeasure with Russia's economic corruption and an indirect protest of its brutal military campaign in Chechnya. The action was announced late in the day by the State Department and the Export-Import Bank, an independent agency that had been intent on approving the aid for energy projects in Siberia and Moscow until White House officials expressed their concerns.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented use of U.S. money to sustain cutting-edge Russian research, the United States has decided to fund a major Russian nuclear laboratory, paying the salaries of 116 former Soviet scientists to work on harnessing nuclear fusion for civilian use, officials said Thursday.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congressional Republicans gave a guarded assessment of President Clinton's proposed 44% increase in U.S. aid to the former Soviet Union. In his proposed fiscal 1998 budget, sent to Congress earlier this month, the president is seeking $900 million in aid for Russia and 11 former Soviet republics, up from $625 million this year. "Our committee can and intends to work with you," House International Relations Committee Chairman Benjamin A. Gilman (R-N.Y.) told J.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher held amicable talks Thursday with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, clearly indicating that, despite the war raging in Chechnya, the Clinton Administration does not want to penalize Russia for its use of force. Kozyrev, grateful for the Clinton Administration's relatively mild response to Chechnya, promised after the talks ended that Russia will not let the end of the Cold War deteriorate into a "cold peace," as Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | From Associated Press
Yelena Bonner, one of Russia's most prominent human rights campaigners, told U.S. lawmakers Thursday that the West should suspend financial aid to Russia because of the war in Chechnya. "The only exception to this should be humanitarian aid," Bonner said through a translator at a congressional hearing on the Chechen rebellion. Bonner, widow of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Andrei D. Sakharov, blamed Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days before Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's arrival for his first summit with President Bush, two Iowa congressmen have begun to organize an effort aimed at freeing up the Bush Administration's $600-million aid package for Russia and other former Soviet republics. Democratic Rep. Dave Nagle and Republican Rep. Jim Leach on Friday assembled organizations ranging from the ultra-liberal Council for a Livable World to the U.S.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton placed a key foreign policy file into his presidential campaign portfolio Thursday, conducting a "very lively and energetic discussion" with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and urging financial aid for Yeltsin's struggling nation.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton administration has offered to help Russia complete a key radar site and to share more American radar data if Russia agrees to renegotiate the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty so that the United States could build a national missile defense system, a senior administration official said Saturday.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
Cranes hoisted the year's first American food aid to Russia onto a wharf in St. Petersburg on Friday after months of delays caused by U.S. concerns that the aid would be stolen or misused. Last fall, officials said the food would help Russia's poor through the winter months, but it arrived with spring only a week away. The aid will instead stabilize the market and make food more affordable, U.S. officials said. "It's not a matter of helping through the winter.
NEWS
December 24, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After mounting a blistering attack on the U.S. bombing of Iraq, Russia swallowed its pride, shelved its anti-American rhetoric and agreed Wednesday to accept 3.1 million tons of emergency food from the United States. In an abrupt turnaround that demonstrates how far Russia has fallen from its days of Soviet glory, officials joined the U.S.
NEWS
November 7, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing food shortages this winter, Russia secured tentative approval Friday for its largest food-aid package in nearly six years--one that will deliver 3.1 million tons of surplus American grain, meat, soybeans and powdered milk to Russians and earn $625 million for U.S. producers. The aid is supposed to benefit the neediest Russians, especially retired people and inhabitants of remote northern and Far East settlements that are running out of food and the money to buy more.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turmoil in Russia's economy after years of Western-backed reform has so shaken the international development community that its entire approach to aiding Moscow has become an open question.
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | From Reuters
The United States will provide at least $500 million in grain and meat to help Russia through the winter, provided Moscow promises the aid package will be fairly distributed, President Clinton said Wednesday. The offer of more than 3 million tons of food comes at a time when the Clinton administration has become increasingly impatient with Russia's economic recovery plan.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush prodded Congress on Tuesday to give swift approval to his multibillion-dollar aid program for Russia, calling it an investment in a "new century of peace." But Democrats and some Republicans quickly countered that Bush himself has failed to work hard enough to muster support for the highly controversial overseas spending in this recession-plagued election year. Even as Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
June 16, 1992
Here are the chief issues on the agenda for the first summit meeting beginning today between President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin. - ARMS CONTROL--Bush and Yeltsin are working toward an agreement that would cut the two nations' nuclear arsenals far below the levels set in the still-unratified START treaty. The plan is to cut warhead limits from 9,000 to about 4,700 on each side, but there are differences on which weapons to include. U.S.
NEWS
September 3, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and TYLER MARSHALL and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With no immediate help to offer, President Clinton ended his summit in Moscow on Wednesday with promises of strong support for Russia's collapsing economy--but only if this nation's leaders take the herculean steps necessary to put reforms back on track.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As prospects for Russia's tattered economy worsened Wednesday, the Clinton administration hinted that the United States might be willing to provide more temporary aid if the crisis there escalates. The White House said President Clinton met with several key economic advisors to discuss the Russian situation as a senior Treasury official arrived in Moscow to discuss possible remedies. So rapidly is the financial picture there deteriorating, U.S.
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