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United States Foreign Aid Saudi Arabia

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BUSINESS
September 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Loans Offered for Saudi Jet Purchase: The U.S. Export-Import Bank will provide up to $4.8 billion in financing if Saudi Arabia's airline buys 60 to 80 new planes from McDonnell Douglas Corp. The loan guarantees set the stage for competition between McDonnell and Boeing Co., since the bank last month offered guarantees of $6.2 billion for buying the aircraft from Boeing. A spokesman for the airline, Saudia, refused to comment. President Clinton reportedly has persuaded King Fahd to buy U.S.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Loans Offered for Saudi Jet Purchase: The U.S. Export-Import Bank will provide up to $4.8 billion in financing if Saudi Arabia's airline buys 60 to 80 new planes from McDonnell Douglas Corp. The loan guarantees set the stage for competition between McDonnell and Boeing Co., since the bank last month offered guarantees of $6.2 billion for buying the aircraft from Boeing. A spokesman for the airline, Saudia, refused to comment. President Clinton reportedly has persuaded King Fahd to buy U.S.
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NEWS
November 21, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is planning to start passing the tin cup overseas once again, seeking a new round of financial contributions from foreign governments to help pay for the mounting costs of the U.S. troop deployment in the Persian Gulf, Administration sources said this week.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war in the Persian Gulf is rapidly drawing to a close. American and coalition troops are liberating Kuwait and trouncing the Iraqi Republican Guard. Now comes the hard part: Getting U.S. allies to help pay for the short but expensive conflict. With the war all but won after just a few days of ground fighting, anger and frustration are rapidly mounting in Congress over the failure of many of the allies to ante up the cash they pledged.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war in the Persian Gulf is rapidly drawing to a close. American and coalition troops are liberating Kuwait and trouncing the Iraqi Republican Guard. Now comes the hard part: Getting U.S. allies to help pay for the short but expensive conflict. With the war all but won after just a few days of ground fighting, anger and frustration are rapidly mounting in Congress over the failure of many of the allies to ante up the cash they pledged.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Times Wires Services
Vice President Dan Quayle, wrapping up a New Year's handshaking tour that brought him into contact with royal leaders and U.S. troops, declared Tuesday that 1991 will not end with Iraqi troops still in Kuwait. Quayle also visited Kuwait's exiled emir and expressed the need to add increased financial support to the tens of billions of dollars required to maintain America's massive military presence in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | KIM MURPHY and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An international containment effort was under way Saturday to hold back a massive surge of crude oil unleashed from Kuwaiti oil facilities into the Persian Gulf in what officials say may be the worst oil disaster in history.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | KIM MURPHY and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An international containment effort was under way Saturday to hold back a massive surge of crude oil unleashed from Kuwaiti oil facilities into the Persian Gulf in what officials say may be the worst oil disaster in history.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Times Wires Services
Vice President Dan Quayle, wrapping up a New Year's handshaking tour that brought him into contact with royal leaders and U.S. troops, declared Tuesday that 1991 will not end with Iraqi troops still in Kuwait. Quayle also visited Kuwait's exiled emir and expressed the need to add increased financial support to the tens of billions of dollars required to maintain America's massive military presence in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is planning to start passing the tin cup overseas once again, seeking a new round of financial contributions from foreign governments to help pay for the mounting costs of the U.S. troop deployment in the Persian Gulf, Administration sources said this week.
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