Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Aid Somalia
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Aid Somalia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to shift the focus of America's role in Somalia from armed intervention to national reconstruction, senior U.S. officials in Mogadishu on Saturday unveiled a $190-million humanitarian assistance plan that will continue to supply food, development aid and U.S. civilian experts to this war-ravaged nation this year. Declaring the aid package "a tremendous amount of money for one, relatively small country," U.S. Special Envoy Robert T.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
LOW BLOW? Shortly after a two-day trip to deliver aid to starving Somalians, heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe received a note from President Clinton, praising his "generosity and kindness." But Ambassador Robert Oakley, the special U.S. envoy to Somalia who for three months endured cramped quarters in the gutted U.S. Embassy during the military operation there, hasn't heard boo from Clinton since his return in March.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
A U.S. food airlift gained momentum Sunday, delivering 216 tons of split peas and wheat flour in 18 flights to northeastern Kenya. Three giant C-141 Starlifters and six of the smaller C-130 Hercules transport planes made two trips each from the Indian Ocean port of Mombasa to the northeastern town of Wajir. Most of the food is destined for about 1 million Kenyans suffering from a two-year drought. A smaller amount is going to 320,000 Somali refugees who fled drought and warfare in their country.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to shift the focus of America's role in Somalia from armed intervention to national reconstruction, senior U.S. officials in Mogadishu on Saturday unveiled a $190-million humanitarian assistance plan that will continue to supply food, development aid and U.S. civilian experts to this war-ravaged nation this year. Declaring the aid package "a tremendous amount of money for one, relatively small country," U.S. Special Envoy Robert T.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | MATT MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States temporarily suspended airlifts to a key area of drought-stricken Somalia on Friday after a supply plane was struck by a bullet apparently fired by warring bandits, who intensified their plundering of relief supply areas. The incident occurred as a U.S. C-130 plane was delivering food to the southern town of Belet Huen near the Ethiopian border early Friday morning. The plane unloaded its cargo and returned without further incident to Mombasa, Kenya, the base of the U.S.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. emergency airlift to Somalia announced with great fanfare by President Bush a week ago is getting off to a shaky start because relief officials and organizations in Somalia and neighboring Kenya were caught unaware that the program was being undertaken. Also left uninformed was the Kenyan government, which on Thursday protested what it called the U.S. failure to request prior clearance for military flights into its airspace.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | From Reuters
The United States told Somalia's feuding factions Friday that it would help rebuild Somalia only if they stop fighting and talk peace. The warning was delivered at fund-raising talks for Somalia a few days before its feuding factions hold a national reconciliation conference to try to restore some form of government. Richard Cobb, head of the U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
LOW BLOW? Shortly after a two-day trip to deliver aid to starving Somalians, heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe received a note from President Clinton, praising his "generosity and kindness." But Ambassador Robert Oakley, the special U.S. envoy to Somalia who for three months endured cramped quarters in the gutted U.S. Embassy during the military operation there, hasn't heard boo from Clinton since his return in March.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly two weeks of logistic and planning glitches, the American relief airlift finally reached Somalia on Friday, as a C-130 Hercules transport touched down here just after dawn sporting a small American flag on its tail and a giant red cross on its camouflaged body. Inside was a 7-ton shipment of rice, beans and cooking oils to help feed more than 100,000 Somalis and others gathered around this famine-stricken town 25 miles from the Ethiopian border.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | From Reuters
The United States told Somalia's feuding factions Friday that it would help rebuild Somalia only if they stop fighting and talk peace. The warning was delivered at fund-raising talks for Somalia a few days before its feuding factions hold a national reconciliation conference to try to restore some form of government. Richard Cobb, head of the U.S.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | MATT MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States temporarily suspended airlifts to a key area of drought-stricken Somalia on Friday after a supply plane was struck by a bullet apparently fired by warring bandits, who intensified their plundering of relief supply areas. The incident occurred as a U.S. C-130 plane was delivering food to the southern town of Belet Huen near the Ethiopian border early Friday morning. The plane unloaded its cargo and returned without further incident to Mombasa, Kenya, the base of the U.S.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly two weeks of logistic and planning glitches, the American relief airlift finally reached Somalia on Friday, as a C-130 Hercules transport touched down here just after dawn sporting a small American flag on its tail and a giant red cross on its camouflaged body. Inside was a 7-ton shipment of rice, beans and cooking oils to help feed more than 100,000 Somalis and others gathered around this famine-stricken town 25 miles from the Ethiopian border.
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
A U.S. food airlift gained momentum Sunday, delivering 216 tons of split peas and wheat flour in 18 flights to northeastern Kenya. Three giant C-141 Starlifters and six of the smaller C-130 Hercules transport planes made two trips each from the Indian Ocean port of Mombasa to the northeastern town of Wajir. Most of the food is destined for about 1 million Kenyans suffering from a two-year drought. A smaller amount is going to 320,000 Somali refugees who fled drought and warfare in their country.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. emergency airlift to Somalia announced with great fanfare by President Bush a week ago is getting off to a shaky start because relief officials and organizations in Somalia and neighboring Kenya were caught unaware that the program was being undertaken. Also left uninformed was the Kenyan government, which on Thursday protested what it called the U.S. failure to request prior clearance for military flights into its airspace.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American private donations for food relief in Somalia this year amount to less than 1% of what relief agencies collected in 1985 at the height of the Ethiopian famine, an aid official said Tuesday. "Thousands of children and adults who need help desperately are dying in silence," in part because Americans and Europeans have failed to respond quickly to the tragedy, said Peter J. Davies, president of InterAction, a coalition of American relief agencies.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American private donations for food relief in Somalia this year amount to less than 1% of what relief agencies collected in 1985 at the height of the Ethiopian famine, an aid official said Tuesday. "Thousands of children and adults who need help desperately are dying in silence," in part because Americans and Europeans have failed to respond quickly to the tragedy, said Peter J. Davies, president of InterAction, a coalition of American relief agencies.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|