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United States Foreign Aid South Africa

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BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, determined to prevent the failure of South Africa's experiment in multiracial democracy, will try to persuade American businesses, pension funds and other institutions to pour billions of dollars into the country's fragile economy after next month's elections, officials said Tuesday. The White House decided to build its South Africa policy around private investment because the U.S.
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NEWS
December 15, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration was chastised Thursday by Democrats as well as Republicans for spending valuable foreign aid dollars on frivolous projects in South Africa, such as a $300,000 grant for hair care training. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), a longtime critic of U.S. assistance to South Africa, declared the entire program to be "a multimillion-dollar fiasco." And even strong supporters of the program, such as Sens. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-Kan.
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NEWS
January 9, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, striving to put the best possible face on sharp cuts in U.S. economic aid for Africa, said Thursday that the West is far more generous than the Soviet Union, which sees the continent only as a potential military outpost. In a speech to Senegalese business leaders and Cabinet officials, Shultz urged Africans to consider "the difference between guns and butter, between stomachs filled with food and heads filled with empty slogans."
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as South Africa's black majority was on the verge of winning freedom from apartheid last year, the Clinton Administration decided to spend precious U.S. aid funds to provide them something that U.S. officials apparently deemed important: hair care. To that end, the U.S. Agency for International Development gave a $300,000 grant--a generous amount by AID standards--to Soft Sheen Products Inc., a black-owned Chicago company, to teach African American hair care techniques to South Africans.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration was chastised Thursday by Democrats as well as Republicans for spending valuable foreign aid dollars on frivolous projects in South Africa, such as a $300,000 grant for hair care training. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), a longtime critic of U.S. assistance to South Africa, declared the entire program to be "a multimillion-dollar fiasco." And even strong supporters of the program, such as Sens. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-Kan.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The glow of goodwill that the Clinton Administration hoped would follow the unveiling of its South African aid package has been dimmed by complaints that it apparently will rely in part on money diverted from other struggling African nations. At a White House meeting Tuesday to discuss the all-race elections in South Africa and plans for U.S. aid, some lawmakers and pro-African groups told President Clinton of their concerns that the diversion of funds would set back other sub-Saharan countries.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration plans to double foreign aid to South Africa, from $80 million to $160 million a year, after elections next month that will be open to all races for the first time, the Agency for International Development said Friday. AID officials said that $73 million of the increase will be offset by across-the-board cuts in development assistance for the rest of the countries in Africa south of the Sahara.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as South Africa's black majority was on the verge of winning freedom from apartheid last year, the Clinton Administration decided to spend precious U.S. aid funds to provide them something that U.S. officials apparently deemed important: hair care. To that end, the U.S. Agency for International Development gave a $300,000 grant--a generous amount by AID standards--to Soft Sheen Products Inc., a black-owned Chicago company, to teach African American hair care techniques to South Africans.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The glow of goodwill that the Clinton Administration hoped would follow the unveiling of its South African aid package has been dimmed by complaints that it apparently will rely in part on money diverted from other struggling African nations. At a White House meeting Tuesday to discuss the all-race elections in South Africa and plans for U.S. aid, some lawmakers and pro-African groups told President Clinton of their concerns that the diversion of funds would set back other sub-Saharan countries.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration plans to double foreign aid to South Africa, from $80 million to $160 million a year, after elections next month that will be open to all races for the first time, the Agency for International Development said Friday. AID officials said that $73 million of the increase will be offset by across-the-board cuts in development assistance for the rest of the countries in Africa south of the Sahara.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, determined to prevent the failure of South Africa's experiment in multiracial democracy, will try to persuade American businesses, pension funds and other institutions to pour billions of dollars into the country's fragile economy after next month's elections, officials said Tuesday. The White House decided to build its South Africa policy around private investment because the U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, striving to put the best possible face on sharp cuts in U.S. economic aid for Africa, said Thursday that the West is far more generous than the Soviet Union, which sees the continent only as a potential military outpost. In a speech to Senegalese business leaders and Cabinet officials, Shultz urged Africans to consider "the difference between guns and butter, between stomachs filled with food and heads filled with empty slogans."
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